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Re: [AZ]

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  • Tadeusz Dauksza
    Warren ; Try Harvest Time Nursery in Mobile; Tadeusz -lake Michigan Chapter ASA Warren Groomes wrote: Hi, Bill Thank you for your reply.
    Message 1 of 23 , Jun 2, 2005
      Warren ;
       
      Try Harvest Time Nursery in Mobile;
       
      Tadeusz -lake Michigan Chapter ASA

      Warren Groomes <wgroomes@...> wrote:
      Hi, Bill
       
      Thank you for your reply.  Do you know of any southern sources for Backacre azaleas?
       
      Warren
      ----- Original Message -----
      Sent: Saturday, May 21, 2005 12:16 AM
      Subject: Re: [AZ]

      Hi Warren,

      Welcome to the maillist.

      You should have general success with the same azaleas that you were familiar with in Maryland like the Back Acres, Harris hybrids, Penningtons, the Glenn Dales, and the Southern Indian hybrids.  Then, there are the Aromi hybrids, a lot of the natives, and a lot of the Satsukis. 

      Regards to Judy,

      Bill Miller
      Bethesda, Maryland

      Warren Groomes wrote:
      WHAT AZALEAS DO WELL IN TAMPA, FLORIDA?
       
      Hi.  I am new to the group.  I have belonged to the Azalea Society of America since its inception.  Last June I moved from Silver Spring, Maryland ( two miles from Brookside Gardens ) to Land O' Lakes, Florida.  I have been looking into starting a new azalea bed here.  I need to know which, if any, Backacres or Southern Indicum azaleas will do well here.  I am in USDA Zone 9 for both cold and heat hardiness.  We do have a few days in the winter when the temperature dips to 35.  We have many days in the 90s but seldom have a day above 98.  We experience dry conditions from about Februrary to June and wet conditions from June to September.
       
      Warren Groomes




      When you reply to this email, PLEASE quote its relevant part(s) only, as context, and DELETE the rest - especially this line and the Yahoo lines.  Also PLEASE tell us where you garden (city, state or at least your USDA zone).

      We welcome images RESIZED to be under 100KB in size - 640 x 480 pixel .jpg images at 50% or 1:40 compression are ideal.

      To unsubscribe, send an email to: azaleas-unsubscribe@yahoogroups.com





      When you reply to this email, PLEASE quote its relevant part(s) only, as context, and DELETE the rest - especially this line and the Yahoo lines.  Also PLEASE tell us where you garden (city, state or at least your USDA zone).

      We welcome images RESIZED to be under 100KB in size - 640 x 480 pixel .jpg images at 50% or 1:40 compression are ideal.

      To unsubscribe, send an email to: azaleas-unsubscribe@yahoogroups.com




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    • Bob Stelloh
      At 9:53 PM -0700 on 6/2/05, Tadeusz Dauksza wrote ... He advertises in the Azalean, and his contact info is on the Sources page of our website
      Message 2 of 23 , Jun 2, 2005
        At 9:53 PM -0700 on 6/2/05, Tadeusz Dauksza wrote
        >Try Harvest Time Nursery in Mobile;

        He advertises in the Azalean, and his contact info is on the
        "Sources" page of our website www.azaleas.org

        Regards,
        Bob Stelloh Hendersonville North Carolina USDA Zone 7
      • Warren Groomes
        Thank you. Warren ... From: Tadeusz Dauksza To: azaleas@yahoogroups.com Sent: Friday, June 03, 2005
        Message 3 of 23 , Jun 3, 2005
          Thank you.
           
          Warren
          ----- Original Message -----
          Sent: Friday, June 03, 2005 12:53 AM
          Subject: Re: [AZ]

          Warren ;
           
          Try Harvest Time Nursery in Mobile;
           
          Tadeusz -lake Michigan Chapter ASA

          Warren Groomes <wgroomes@...> wrote:
          Hi, Bill
           
          Thank you for your reply.  Do you know of any southern sources for Backacre azaleas?
           
          Warren
          ----- Original Message -----
          Sent: Saturday, May 21, 2005 12:16 AM
          Subject: Re: [AZ]

          Hi Warren,

          Welcome to the maillist.

          You should have general success with the same azaleas that you were familiar with in Maryland like the Back Acres, Harris hybrids, Penningtons, the Glenn Dales, and the Southern Indian hybrids.  Then, there are the Aromi hybrids, a lot of the natives, and a lot of the Satsukis. 

          Regards to Judy,

          Bill Miller
          Bethesda, Maryland

          Warren Groomes wrote:
          WHAT AZALEAS DO WELL IN TAMPA, FLORIDA?
           
          Hi.  I am new to the group.  I have belonged to the Azalea Society of America since its inception.  Last June I moved from Silver Spring, Maryland ( two miles from Brookside Gardens ) to Land O' Lakes, Florida.  I have been looking into starting a new azalea bed here.  I need to know which, if any, Backacres or Southern Indicum azaleas will do well here.  I am in USDA Zone 9 for both cold and heat hardiness.  We do have a few days in the winter when the temperature dips to 35.  We have many days in the 90s but seldom have a day above 98.  We experience dry conditions from about Februrary to June and wet conditions from June to September.
           
          Warren Groomes




          When you reply to this email, PLEASE quote its relevant part(s) only, as context, and DELETE the rest - especially this line and the Yahoo lines.  Also PLEASE tell us where you garden (city, state or at least your USDA zone).

          We welcome images RESIZED to be under 100KB in size - 640 x 480 pixel .jpg images at 50% or 1:40 compression are ideal.

          To unsubscribe, send an email to: azaleas-unsubscribe@yahoogroups.com





          When you reply to this email, PLEASE quote its relevant part(s) only, as context, and DELETE the rest - especially this line and the Yahoo lines.  Also PLEASE tell us where you garden (city, state or at least your USDA zone).

          We welcome images RESIZED to be under 100KB in size - 640 x 480 pixel .jpg images at 50% or 1:40 compression are ideal.

          To unsubscribe, send an email to: azaleas-unsubscribe@yahoogroups.com




          Discover Yahoo!
          Have fun online with music videos, cool games, IM & more. Check it out!

          When you reply to this email, PLEASE quote its relevant part(s) only, as context, and DELETE the rest - especially this line and the Yahoo lines.  Also PLEASE tell us where you garden (city, state or at least your USDA zone).

          We welcome images RESIZED to be under 100KB in size - 640 x 480 pixel .jpg images at 50% or 1:40 compression are ideal.

          To unsubscribe, send an email to: azaleas-unsubscribe@yahoogroups.com



        • Tadeusz Dauksza
          Warren, I forgot; here is thier link, I have ordered plants from them, friendly staff, great sized plants, prices can;t be beat, and they ship;
          Message 4 of 23 , Jun 3, 2005
            Warren, I forgot;
             
             here is thier link,  I have ordered plants from them, friendly staff,  great sized plants, prices can;t be beat, and they ship; 
             
             
             Tadeusz.

            Warren Groomes <wgroomes@...> wrote:
            Thank you.
             
            Warren
            ----- Original Message -----
            Sent: Friday, June 03, 2005 12:53 AM
            Subject: Re: [AZ]

            Warren ;
             
            Try Harvest Time Nursery in Mobile;
             
            Tadeusz -lake Michigan Chapter ASA

            Warren Groomes <wgroomes@...> wrote:
            Hi, Bill
             
            Thank you for your reply.  Do you know of any southern sources for Backacre azaleas?
             
            Warren
            ----- Original Message -----
            Sent: Saturday, May 21, 2005 12:16 AM
            Subject: Re: [AZ]

            Hi Warren,

            Welcome to the maillist.

            You should have general success with the same azaleas that you were familiar with in Maryland like the Back Acres, Harris hybrids, Penningtons, the Glenn Dales, and the Southern Indian hybrids.  Then, there are the Aromi hybrids, a lot of the natives, and a lot of the Satsukis. 

            Regards to Judy,

            Bill Miller
            Bethesda, Maryland

            Warren Groomes wrote:
            WHAT AZALEAS DO WELL IN TAMPA, FLORIDA?
             
            Hi.  I am new to the group.  I have belonged to the Azalea Society of America since its inception.  Last June I moved from Silver Spring, Maryland ( two miles from Brookside Gardens ) to Land O' Lakes, Florida.  I have been looking into starting a new azalea bed here.  I need to know which, if any, Backacres or Southern Indicum azaleas will do well here.  I am in USDA Zone 9 for both cold and heat hardiness.  We do have a few days in the winter when the temperature dips to 35.  We have many days in the 90s but seldom have a day above 98.  We experience dry conditions from about Februrary to June and wet conditions from June to September.
             
            Warren Groomes




            When you reply to this email, PLEASE quote its relevant part(s) only, as context, and DELETE the rest - especially this line and the Yahoo lines.  Also PLEASE tell us where you garden (city, state or at least your USDA zone).

            We welcome images RESIZED to be under 100KB in size - 640 x 480 pixel .jpg images at 50% or 1:40 compression are ideal.

            To unsubscribe, send an email to: azaleas-unsubscribe@yahoogroups.com





            When you reply to this email, PLEASE quote its relevant part(s) only, as context, and DELETE the rest - especially this line and the Yahoo lines.  Also PLEASE tell us where you garden (city, state or at least your USDA zone).

            We welcome images RESIZED to be under 100KB in size - 640 x 480 pixel .jpg images at 50% or 1:40 compression are ideal.

            To unsubscribe, send an email to: azaleas-unsubscribe@yahoogroups.com




            Discover Yahoo!
            Have fun online with music videos, cool games, IM & more. Check it out!

            When you reply to this email, PLEASE quote its relevant part(s) only, as context, and DELETE the rest - especially this line and the Yahoo lines.  Also PLEASE tell us where you garden (city, state or at least your USDA zone).

            We welcome images RESIZED to be under 100KB in size - 640 x 480 pixel .jpg images at 50% or 1:40 compression are ideal.

            To unsubscribe, send an email to: azaleas-unsubscribe@yahoogroups.com





            When you reply to this email, PLEASE quote its relevant part(s) only, as context, and DELETE the rest - especially this line and the Yahoo lines.  Also PLEASE tell us where you garden (city, state or at least your USDA zone).

            We welcome images RESIZED to be under 100KB in size - 640 x 480 pixel .jpg images at 50% or 1:40 compression are ideal.

            To unsubscribe, send an email to: azaleas-unsubscribe@yahoogroups.com




            Discover Yahoo!
            Have fun online with music videos, cool games, IM & more. Check it out!

          • Joe Schild
            Jill, From your description and the good photos, it looks like a leaf gall fungus has taken home in your plant. Pinch the galls off and destroy them as soon as
            Message 5 of 23 , May 1, 2006
              Jill,
              From your description and the good photos, it looks like a leaf gall fungus has taken home in your plant. Pinch the galls off and destroy them as soon as possible. Leaf gall problems usually occur in early spring when the temperatures are lower and there are moist conditions. Some evergreen azaleas seem to be more suspetable than others.
               
              Another problem to look for is the flower gall. The fungus attacks the blooms with similar results.
               
              Joe Schild-Hixson, TN USDA Zone 7a
              Ask a friend to join the Azalea Society of America!
               
               
              ----- Original Message -----
              Sent: 5/1/06 11:26:30 AM
              Subject: [AZ]

              This is from the ASK US Page, so please send me a CC:
              I have some sort of fungus on my bushes that attacks the leaves, leaving them swollen, white, and hard.  Can you please tell me what to do, I didnt have any blooms this season.
               
              Thanks
              Jill Davis
            • Joe Schild
              Gin, Most azaleas in pots or baskets given as presents are usually from the florist trade and are not normally very cold hardy. If you wish to keep it through
              Message 6 of 23 , May 16, 2006
                Gin,
                Most azaleas in pots or baskets given as presents are usually from the florist trade and are not normally very cold hardy. If you wish to keep it through the winter, I would bring it inside to a warm garage or basement and perhaps use one of the shop lights over it for a normal day length. Do not over water it but keep the soil moist. Next year you may wish to re-pot it in a different or larger container of just root prune it after it flowers.
                 
                Joe Schild-Hixson, TN USDA Zone 7a
                Ask a friend to join the Azalea Society of America!
                 
                 
                ----- Original Message -----
                From: Gin Wells
                Sent: 5/16/06 11:29:57 AM
                Subject: [AZ]

                This is from the ASK US page, so please send me a (CC)

                I received a hanging basket of azaleas for mothers day.  What do I do with it the fall ?  I live in Idaho with very cold temperatures fall and winter.

                 

                gin wells

                accounts payable

                bmc west

                idaho falls idaho

                phone: (208) 557-5039

                fax: (208) 529-3610

              • George Klump
                Myron, I live in La Crescenta. Go up to Nuccio s Nurseries. They have plenty of them. There is Orange Sander , Orange Chimes , Willem van Orange , etc.
                Message 7 of 23 , Mar 10, 2007
                  Myron,
                   
                  I live in La Crescenta.  Go up to Nuccio's Nurseries.  They have plenty of them.  There is 'Orange Sander', 'Orange Chimes', 'Willem van Orange', etc.  I have several.  Most of them are probably in the Belgian Indica group which means not too much direct sun.  But they will survive here beautifully.  Just make sure that the root zone is kept cool by watering during the summer.
                   
                  George Klump
                  La Crescenta
                   
                   
                   
                   
                  ----- Original Message -----
                  Sent: Friday, March 09, 2007 4:47 PM
                  Subject: [AZ]

                  (This is from the ASK US page, so please send me a CC)

                  I live in Pasadena, California which I believe is zone 9 according to some catalogues, and am trying to find an orange azalea.  I only ever see varieties of pink and white in the nurseries but I remember seeing advertised somewhere a new variety that can survive our summer heat blast.

                  I would appreciate any help.

                • Tom Schuetz
                  Kent, it helps to answer questions about your azaleas if you include some information on where you live. Are the azaleas evergreen or deciduous? By the way, I
                  Message 8 of 23 , Apr 1, 2007
                    Kent, it helps to answer questions about your azaleas if you include some information on where you live. Are the azaleas evergreen or deciduous? By the way, I know of no chemical released by azaleas which would irritate the skin.
                    Tom Schuetz
                    schuetz101@...
                    Mechanicsburg, PA   USDA Zone 6a
                    ----- Original Message -----
                    Sent: Sunday, April 01, 2007 9:41 AM
                    Subject: [AZ]

                    When I work in and among my azaleas, my hands, arms, and legs begin to itch.  Please let me know what is causing this and the treatment, if any.  Would there be some type of small insect like a spider mite or some chemical that the azalea gives off.  Thank you.

                  • Vivian Abney
                    I have experienced this same itching when working in azaleas in the nursery. I don t think it is insects, as I see no evidence of their presence. Nor do I
                    Message 9 of 23 , Apr 1, 2007
                      I have experienced this same itching when working in azaleas in the nursery.  I don't think it is insects, as I see no evidence of their presence.   Nor do I think it is from insecticides, as I apply very little and then only if needed. 
                      Perhaps it is an allergic reaction. 
                       
                      Vivian Abney
                      East Fork Nursery
                      Zone 6
                       
                       
                      ----- Original Message -----
                      Sent: Sunday, April 01, 2007 1:10 PM
                      Subject: Re: [AZ]

                      Kent, it helps to answer questions about your azaleas if you include some information on where you live. Are the azaleas evergreen or deciduous? By the way, I know of no chemical released by azaleas which would irritate the skin.
                      Tom Schuetz
                      schuetz101@comcast. net
                      Mechanicsburg, PA   USDA Zone 6a
                      ----- Original Message -----
                      Sent: Sunday, April 01, 2007 9:41 AM
                      Subject: [AZ]

                      When I work in and among my azaleas, my hands, arms, and legs begin to itch.  Please let me know what is causing this and the treatment, if any.  Would there be some type of small insect like a spider mite or some chemical that the azalea gives off.  Thank you.

                    • Bill Turk
                      There is something to this, at least on many evergreen varieties. At our nursery, many, but not all of us have experienced this temporary itching sensation as
                      Message 10 of 23 , Apr 1, 2007

                        There is something to this, at least on many evergreen varieties.  At our nursery, many, but not all of us have experienced this temporary itching sensation as well as minor rashes while working in the evergreen azaleas.

                        (Message over 64 KB, truncated)

                      • Earl Sommerville
                        The itching is cause by a very little bug which you will need a magnifying glass to see. I use to have that problem and I started to to use Orthene two are
                        Message 11 of 23 , Apr 1, 2007
                           
                          The itching is cause by a very little bug which you will need a magnifying glass to see.
                          I use to have that problem and I started to to use Orthene two are three times a year; in late April , May and again in late June. they have not been a problem in a lot of years now. In the June spraying I also add a Miticide.
                           
                          We got rain today all of that yellow- green stuff is gone.
                           
                          Earl Sommerville
                          Marietta GA
                           
                           
                           
                           
                           
                           
                          ----- Original Message -----
                          To: azaleas@yahoogroups.com
                          Sent: 4/1/2007 2:29:48 PM
                          Subject: Re: [AZ]

                          I have experienced this same itching when working in azaleas in the nursery.  I don't think it is insects, as I see no evidence of their presence.   Nor do I think it is from insecticides, as I apply very little and then only if needed. 
                          Perhaps it is an allergic reaction. 
                           
                          Vivian Abney
                          East Fork Nursery
                          Zone 6
                           
                           
                          ----- Original Message -----
                          Sent: Sunday, April 01, 2007 1:10 PM
                          Subject: Re: [AZ]

                          Kent, it helps to answer questions about your azaleas if you include some information on where you live. Are the azaleas evergreen or deciduous? By the way, I know of no chemical released by azaleas which would irritate the skin.
                          Tom Schuetz
                          schuetz101@comcast. net
                          Mechanicsburg, PA   USDA Zone 6a
                          ----- Original Message -----
                          Sent: Sunday, April 01, 2007 9:41 AM
                          Subject: [AZ]

                          When I work in and among my azaleas, my hands, arms, and legs begin to itch.  Please let me know what is causing this and the treatment, if any.  Would there be some type of small insect like a spider mite or some chemical that the azalea gives off.  Thank you.

                        • J.T.
                          Kent and Vivian. You probably got chiggers on your skin. I use Permethrin Pro . Use one ounce of concentrate per 1,000 square feet of area to be treated.
                          Message 12 of 23 , Apr 1, 2007
                            Kent and Vivian.
                            You probably got "chiggers" on your skin.  I use "Permethrin Pro".  Use one ounce of concentrate per 1,000 square feet of area to be treated.  Use a hose-end sprayer for applying to lawns, fence rows. This is safe for use in areas where children, pets and wildlife frequent when applied correctly.  Keep people and pets off treated areas until dry. 
                             
                            Conversely, the pesticides that Earl recommended are considered hasardous.
                             
                            This is what the pesticide labels read:
                            ORTHENE
                            HAZARDS TO HUMANS AND DOMESTIC ANIMALS
                            WARNING: Causes substantial but temporary eye injury. Harmful if swallowed or absorbed through skin. Do not get in eyes or on clothing. Avoid contact with skin. Wear goggles or face shield. Wash thoroughly with soap and water after handling. Remove contaminated clothing and wash clothing before reuse.
                            For Use On Ornamental Plants in Commercial Greenhouses
                              
                            MITICIDE/INSECTICIDE
                            SAFETY DIRECTIONS
                            Poisonous if absorbed by skin contact or swallowed. Will damage eyes. Will irritate the skin. Avoid contact with eyes and skin. DO NOT inhale spray mist. When opening the container, preparing spray and using prepared spray, wear: cotton overalls buttoned to the neck and wrist,  a washable hat,  elbow-length butyl rubber gloves, and goggles and a  half face piece respirator with dust cartridge or canister.
                             
                            Comments????
                            = = = = = = = =

                            Earl Sommerville <earlsommerville@...> wrote:
                             
                            The itching is cause by a very little bug which you will need a magnifying glass to see.
                            I use to have that problem and I started to to use Orthene two are three times a year; in late April , May and again in late June. they have not been a problem in a lot of years now. In the June spraying I also add a Miticide.
                             
                            We got rain today all of that yellow- green stuff is gone.
                             
                            Earl Sommerville
                            Marietta GA
                             
                             
                             
                             
                             
                             
                            ----- Original Message -----
                            To: azaleas@yahoogroups .com
                            Sent: 4/1/2007 2:29:48 PM
                            Subject: Re: [AZ]

                            I have experienced this same itching when working in azaleas in the nursery.  I don't think it is insects, as I see no evidence of their presence.   Nor do I think it is from insecticides, as I apply very little and then only if needed. 
                            Perhaps it is an allergic reaction. 
                             
                            Vivian Abney
                            East Fork Nursery
                            Zone 6
                             
                             
                            ----- Original Message -----
                            Sent: Sunday, April 01, 2007 1:10 PM
                            Subject: Re: [AZ]

                            Kent, it helps to answer questions about your azaleas if you include some information on where you live. Are the azaleas evergreen or deciduous? By the way, I know of no chemical released by azaleas which would irritate the skin.
                            Tom Schuetz
                            schuetz101@comcast. net
                            Mechanicsburg, PA   USDA Zone 6a
                            ----- Original Message -----
                            Sent: Sunday, April 01, 2007 9:41 AM
                            Subject: [AZ]

                            When I work in and among my azaleas, my hands, arms, and legs begin to itch.  Please let me know what is causing this and the treatment, if any.  Would there be some type of small insect like a spider mite or some chemical that the azalea gives off.  Thank you.


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                          • J.T.
                            Kent and Vivian, The hazard labels warn against using insecticides Orthene and Mitixide. What you contracted could have possibly been chiggers, i.e. red bug
                            Message 13 of 23 , Apr 1, 2007
                              Kent and Vivian,
                               
                              The hazard labels warn against using insecticides Orthene and Mitixide.

                              What you contracted could have possibly been chiggers, i.e. red bug

                              A chigger or red bug is an immature stage (larvae) of the harvest mite.  Like all mites, the harvest mite life cycle includes larva, nymph, and adult.  In the last two stages, this mite feeds on plant materials.  The stage that gets the attention of humans is the larval stage.  This is the stage that is considered to be a pest, causing intense itching.
                              The tiny nymph (chigger) will infest humans (and other animals) usually when we work or walk in tall grass or other such undergrowth.  The chigger has a mouthpart similar to that of a tick and uses this mouthpart for feeding.  But, unlike ticks, chiggers do not feed on our blood.

                              A chigger's saliva will at first harden the walls of the hole made by its mouthpart.  This hardening gives the chigger a "straw" to use for feeding and prevents our body from closing off the hole made by this pest.  Once the chigger has made its hole, it can now feed.  Its saliva will actually liquefy our skin cells which the bug now uses for food.
                              The chemicals or proteins in a chigger's saliva will cause itching in the area where the tiny red bug feeds.  This itching is delayed; we sense intense itching about 24 to 48 hours after being exposed to chigger bites.  Some itching might be detected in 3 or 4 hours but the worst sensations (a day or two later) are what fool us into believing that we picked up chiggers (or red bugs, as they are sometimes called) in our lawn.
                              Having a terrible itch from red bugs or chiggers?  Where were you yesterday or the day before?  That area is usually the origin of infestation.  This is very important when
                              eliminating chiggers or harvest mites in all stages.
                              A chigger is too tiny to see with the naked eye but a group of them can be visible when they congregate on our ankles, waist or other body area.  (These areas are preferred by the chigger because our skin is thinner and makes it easier for this microscopic pest to penetrate our skin for its meal.)  When grouped together in large numbers they appear red in color.  This is their natural color, not caused by blood feeding!

                              Chigger Myths

                              Chiggers do not bore into and live inside of our skin.  Applying finger nail polish or other household chemicals to red bumps on our skin does not help.  They will not burrow deep inside our body and eventually die.  By the time your severe itching problem sets in, the chigger is nowhere in sight.  Trying to smother a chigger with various products is a total waste of your time and might actually cause more problems.
                              Chiggers do not drink blood.  They are red because that is their color.  Chiggers drink liquefied skin cells.  Ticks feed on blood; chiggers do not.
                              A chigger or red bug is not an adult bug.  It is an immature larvae.
                              These pests are not insects; they are mites.
                              That tiny hole or red bump on your skin is not where chiggers lay eggs.  A chigger is a baby, a harvest mite larvae.  Only the adult harvest mite lays eggs.

                              Elimination

                              Once you have established which area the chiggers have infested, you can treat lawns, fence rows and ornamentals with Permethrin Pro
                               
                              Comments?


                              Earl Sommerville <earlsommerville@...> wrote:
                               
                              The itching is cause by a very little bug which you will need a magnifying glass to see.
                              I use to have that problem and I started to to use Orthene two are three times a year; in late April , May and again in late June. they have not been a problem in a lot of years now. In the June spraying I also add a Miticide.
                               
                              We got rain today all of that yellow- green stuff is gone.
                               
                              Earl Sommerville
                              Marietta GA
                               
                               
                               
                               
                               
                               
                              ----- Original Message -----
                              To: azaleas@yahoogroups .com
                              Sent: 4/1/2007 2:29:48 PM
                              Subject: Re: [AZ]

                              I have experienced this same itching when working in azaleas in the nursery.  I don't think it is insects, as I see no evidence of their presence.   Nor do I think it is from insecticides, as I apply very little and then only if needed. 
                              Perhaps it is an allergic reaction. 
                               
                              Vivian Abney
                              East Fork Nursery
                              Zone 6
                               
                               
                              ----- Original Message -----
                              Sent: Sunday, April 01, 2007 1:10 PM
                              Subject: Re: [AZ]

                              Kent, it helps to answer questions about your azaleas if you include some information on where you live. Are the azaleas evergreen or deciduous? By the way, I know of no chemical released by azaleas which would irritate the skin.
                              Tom Schuetz
                              schuetz101@comcast. net
                              Mechanicsburg, PA   USDA Zone 6a
                              ----- Original Message -----
                              Sent: Sunday, April 01, 2007 9:41 AM
                              Subject: [AZ]

                              When I work in and among my azaleas, my hands, arms, and legs begin to itch.  Please let me know what is causing this and the treatment, if any.  Would there be some type of small insect like a spider mite or some chemical that the azalea gives off.  Thank you.


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                            • Vivian Abney
                              No, it wasn t chiggers that caused an itching from azaleas. I am well familiar with chiggers. Used to get them when I went blackberry-picking. Vivian ...
                              Message 14 of 23 , Apr 1, 2007
                                No, it wasn't chiggers that caused an itching from azaleas.   I am well familiar with chiggers.  Used to get them when I went blackberry-picking.
                                 
                                Vivian
                                 
                                ----- Original Message -----
                                From: J.T.
                                Sent: Sunday, April 01, 2007 9:01 PM
                                Subject: Re: [AZ] Insecticides, Chiggers and Infested Azalea Bushes

                                Kent and Vivian,
                                 
                                The hazard labels warn against using insecticides Orthene and Mitixide.

                                What you contracted could have possibly been chiggers, i.e. red bug

                                A chigger or red bug is an immature stage (larvae) of the harvest mite.  Like all mites, the harvest mite life cycle includes larva, nymph, and adult.  In the last two stages, this mite feeds on plant materials.  The stage that gets the attention of humans is the larval stage.  This is the stage that is considered to be a pest, causing intense itching.
                                The tiny nymph (chigger) will infest humans (and other animals) usually when we work or walk in tall grass or other such undergrowth.  The chigger has a mouthpart similar to that of a tick and uses this mouthpart for feeding.  But, unlike ticks, chiggers do not feed on our blood.

                                A chigger's saliva will at first harden the walls of the hole made by its mouthpart.  This hardening gives the chigger a "straw" to use for feeding and prevents our body from closing off the hole made by this pest.  Once the chigger has made its hole, it can now feed.  Its saliva will actually liquefy our skin cells which the bug now uses for food.
                                The chemicals or proteins in a chigger's saliva will cause itching in the area where the tiny red bug feeds.  This itching is delayed; we sense intense itching about 24 to 48 hours after being exposed to chigger bites.  Some itching might be detected in 3 or 4 hours but the worst sensations (a day or two later) are what fool us into believing that we picked up chiggers (or red bugs, as they are sometimes called) in our lawn.
                                Having a terrible itch from red bugs or chiggers?  Where were you yesterday or the day before?  That area is usually the origin of infestation.  This is very important when
                                eliminating chiggers or harvest mites in all stages.
                                A chigger is too tiny to see with the naked eye but a group of them can be visible when they congregate on our ankles, waist or other body area.  (These areas are preferred by the chigger because our skin is thinner and makes it easier for this microscopic pest to penetrate our skin for its meal.)  When grouped together in large numbers they appear red in color.  This is their natural color, not caused by blood feeding!

                                Chigger Myths

                                Chiggers do not bore into and live inside of our skin.  Applying finger nail polish or other household chemicals to red bumps on our skin does not help.  They will not burrow deep inside our body and eventually die.  By the time your severe itching problem sets in, the chigger is nowhere in sight.  Trying to smother a chigger with various products is a total waste of your time and might actually cause more problems.
                                Chiggers do not drink blood.  They are red because that is their color.  Chiggers drink liquefied skin cells.  Ticks feed on blood; chiggers do not.
                                A chigger or red bug is not an adult bug.  It is an immature larvae.
                                These pests are not insects; they are mites.
                                That tiny hole or red bump on your skin is not where chiggers lay eggs.  A chigger is a baby, a harvest mite larvae.  Only the adult harvest mite lays eggs.

                                Elimination

                                Once you have established which area the chiggers have infested, you can treat lawns, fence rows and ornamentals with Permethrin Pro
                                 
                                Comments?


                                Earl Sommerville <earlsommerville@ mindspring. com> wrote:
                                 
                                The itching is cause by a very little bug which you will need a magnifying glass to see.
                                I use to have that problem and I started to to use Orthene two are three times a year; in late April , May and again in late June. they have not been a problem in a lot of years now. In the June spraying I also add a Miticide.
                                 
                                We got rain today all of that yellow- green stuff is gone.
                                 
                                Earl Sommerville
                                Marietta GA
                                 
                                 
                                 
                                 
                                 
                                 
                                ----- Original Message -----
                                To: azaleas@yahoogroups .com
                                Sent: 4/1/2007 2:29:48 PM
                                Subject: Re: [AZ]

                                I have experienced this same itching when working in azaleas in the nursery.  I don't think it is insects, as I see no evidence of their presence.   Nor do I think it is from insecticides, as I apply very little and then only if needed. 
                                Perhaps it is an allergic reaction. 
                                 
                                Vivian Abney
                                East Fork Nursery
                                Zone 6
                                 
                                 
                                ----- Original Message -----
                                Sent: Sunday, April 01, 2007 1:10 PM
                                Subject: Re: [AZ]

                                Kent, it helps to answer questions about your azaleas if you include some information on where you live. Are the azaleas evergreen or deciduous? By the way, I know of no chemical released by azaleas which would irritate the skin.
                                Tom Schuetz
                                schuetz101@comcast. net
                                Mechanicsburg, PA   USDA Zone 6a
                                ----- Original Message -----
                                Sent: Sunday, April 01, 2007 9:41 AM
                                Subject: [AZ]

                                When I work in and among my azaleas, my hands, arms, and legs begin to itch.  Please let me know what is causing this and the treatment, if any.  Would there be some type of small insect like a spider mite or some chemical that the azalea gives off.  Thank you.


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                              • Vivian Abney
                                Bill, Yes, exactly. The itching and rash is temporary in nature. Another person here at the nursery has been affected, but others not at all. Vivian ...
                                Message 15 of 23 , Apr 1, 2007
                                  Bill,
                                   
                                  Yes, exactly.  The itching and rash is temporary in nature.  Another person here at the nursery has been affected, but others not at all.
                                   
                                  Vivian
                                   
                                   
                                  ----- Original Message -----
                                  From: Bill Turk
                                  Sent: Sunday, April 01, 2007 6:07 PM
                                  Subject: RE: [AZ]

                                  There is something to this, at least on many evergreen varieties.  At our nursery, many, but not all of us have experienced this temporary itching sensation as well as minor rashes while working in the evergreen azaleas.  There seems to be no correlation to insects or chemicals.  The good news is that no one hear has experienced any long term irritation or serious reactions(anaphylax is or whatever).  Sunscreen seems to help some of us.

                                  Bill Turk

                                  Martins Nursery

                                  Semmes, AL

                                  Zone 8

                                  -----Original Message-----
                                  From: azaleas@yahoogroups .com [mailto:azaleas@ yahoogroups. com] On Behalf Of Vivian Abney
                                  Sent: Sunday, April 01, 2007 1:29 PM
                                  To: azaleas@yahoogroups .com
                                  Cc: Kent Berthold
                                  Subject: Re: [AZ]

                                  I have experienced this same itching when working in azaleas in the nursery.  I don't think it is insects, as I see no evidence of their presence.   Nor do I think it is from insecticides, as I apply very little and then only if needed. 

                                  Perhaps it is an allergic reaction. 

                                  Vivian Abney

                                  East Fork Nursery

                                  Zone 6

                                  ----- Original Message -----

                                  Sent: Sunday, April 01, 2007 1:10 PM

                                  Subject: Re: [AZ]

                                  Kent, it helps to answer questions about your azaleas if you include some information on where you live. Are the azaleas evergreen or deciduous? By the way, I know of no chemical released by azaleas which would irritate the skin.

                                  Tom Schuetz
                                  schuetz101@comcast. net
                                  Mechanicsburg, PA   USDA Zone 6a

                                  ----- Original Message -----

                                  Sent: Sunday, April 01, 2007 9:41 AM

                                  Subject: [AZ]

                                  When I work in and among my azaleas, my hands, arms, and legs begin to itch.  Please let me know what is causing this and the treatment, if any.  Would there be some type of small insect like a spider mite or some chemical that the azalea gives off.  Thank you.

                                • Harold Greer
                                  Any extended period below 32F will destroy the flowers and new growth. I wish there were a magic potent that would keep that from happening, but no one has
                                  Message 16 of 23 , Apr 8, 2007

                                    Any extended period below 32F will destroy the flowers and new growth.  I wish there were a magic potent that would keep that from happening, but no one has found that yet.  For years farmers have used smudge pots or wind to prevent frost on plants that will not stand below freezing, and they work for only a few degrees, if that.

                                     

                                    Protection with cover, etc. will help, but if the temperature under the cover stays below 32 F for long, the flowers are going to freeze.  Yes, the plants will recover, but the flowers that are opening will be lost for that spring.

                                     

                                    Haorld Greer

                                     


                                    From: azaleas@yahoogroups.com [mailto: azaleas@yahoogroups.com ] On Behalf Of Morris Spearman
                                    Sent: Sunday, April 08, 2007 3:16 PM
                                    To: azaleas@yahoogroups.com
                                    Subject: [AZ]

                                     

                                    Subj: will blossoms be killed at 24 deg F?

                                    this is from the ASK US page, so please send me a CC

                                    I live in Charlotte NC where we rarely have cold to 10F or heat to 100F.
                                    Most of our azaleas are in full bloom this weekend.
                                    Tonight 6 April 2007 we are expecting 24F temperature. Should I cover any
                                    azalea plants?
                                    those under leafing-out oak and sycamore trees,
                                    those against the house?
                                    those in the open?

                                    Thanks, Morris Spearman

                                  • Tom Schuetz
                                    Ann, Chinzan is a satsuki azalea which is a bonsai favorite. It is quite slow growing. Mine is about 2 foot tall and 31/2 foot wide in about 25 years. It is
                                    Message 17 of 23 , May 20, 2007
                                      Ann, Chinzan is a satsuki azalea which is a bonsai favorite. It is quite slow growing. Mine is about 2 foot tall and 31/2 foot wide in about 25 years. It is available from Nuccio's nursery in California. I also have a hybrid of Nakaharai which is less than half as big as Chinzan about the same time period. I do not know where such a plant is commercially available but it obviously exists. 
                                      Tom Schuetz
                                      schuetz101@...
                                      Mechanicsburg, PA   USDA Zone 6a
                                      ----- Original Message -----
                                      From: Ann Glynn
                                      Sent: Sunday, May 20, 2007 4:12 PM
                                      Subject: [AZ]

                                      This is from the ASK US page, so please send me a CC.  I live in Tocoma Washington, a moderate lheardiness zone.  I want to put small azaleas in my rock garden.  I have been unable to find anything smaller than 3 feet.  What are the manes of the small ones you mention in your qustion and answer section?  Where could I buy some.  Thank you.

                                    • Larry Wallace
                                      This came from: http://www.rhododendron.org/search_multi_azalea.htm The search by multiple parameters for Azaleas is NEW !. Results: Name,
                                      Message 18 of 23 , May 21, 2007
                                        This came from:
                                         
                                        The search by multiple parameters for Azaleas is NEW !.
                                        Results:
                                         
                                        Name,                                   Bloom time, 1' tall @ 10 years, hardy to ___ , color
                                         

                                        Betty Anne Voss 

                                        LM 

                                        -10 

                                        Purple 

                                          More Information

                                        Diamant Purpur or Purple Diamond 

                                        LM 

                                        -10 

                                        Purple 

                                          More Information

                                        Diamant Rot or Red Diamond 

                                        LM 

                                        -10 

                                        Red 

                                          More Information

                                        Hardy Gardenia 

                                        M - LM 

                                        -5 

                                        White 

                                          More Information

                                        Hino-red 

                                        -20 

                                        Red 

                                          More Information

                                        Hino-white 

                                        -20 

                                        White 

                                          More Information

                                        Joseph Hill 

                                        -5 

                                        Pink 

                                          More Information

                                        Lady Louise 

                                        LM 

                                        -10 

                                        Pink 

                                          More Information

                                        Laura Morland 

                                        LM - L 

                                        -10 

                                        Pink 

                                          More Information

                                        Mariko 

                                        10 

                                        Pink 

                                          More Information

                                        Michael Hill 

                                        -5 

                                        Pink 

                                          More Information

                                        Mount Seven Star 

                                        L - VL 

                                        Red 

                                          More Information

                                        Nancy of Robinhill 

                                        LM 

                                        -10 

                                        Pink 

                                          More Information

                                        Orange Sherbet 

                                        Red 

                                          More Information

                                        Panda 

                                        -5 

                                        White 

                                          More Information

                                        Pink Pancake 

                                        VL 

                                        Pink 

                                          More Information

                                        Red Fountain 

                                        LM - L 

                                        -5 

                                        Orange 

                                          More Information

                                        Snow Cloud 

                                        EM 

                                        White 

                                          More Information

                                        Wintergreen 

                                        -5 

                                        Pink 

                                          More Information



                                         
                                      • George Klump
                                        21 May 2007 Ann, Satsuki azaleas, as a group, tend to be the small ones you want. They do not get much above 14 to 18 . They are often repeat blooming or
                                        Message 19 of 23 , May 21, 2007
                                          21 May 2007
                                           
                                          Ann,
                                           
                                          Satsuki azaleas, as a group, tend to be the 'small ones' you want.  They do not get much above 14" to 18".  They are often repeat blooming or at least tend to spot bloom a good deal of the year.  They frequently have multiple colors on the same azalea: that's a characteristic.  Some colors are solid, some have stripes, some have colored edges, some have speckled throats.  They're all interesting. 
                                           
                                          As examples, there is "Mai-Ogi" which is usually white with all kinds of stripes and speckles, some a deep pink, some an orange-red, some solid colors.  There is "Shinsen" which has many variations of flower color, some with orange-red speckles, some with stripes, some a solid pink. . . .just about anything one could want on a single plant.  Or there is "Issho-no-Haru #3", a beautiful Satsuki sport of "Issho-no-Haru", with large flowers of purple.  Of the more orchid color is "Haru-no-Sono #3", a sport of "Haru-no-Sono" with lovely large orchid-colored flowers, some leaning toward an orchid-pink or an orchid-rose color.  Nuccio's Nurseries have one they developed called "July Sunrise".  Its color is salmon, but it blooms, or tends to bloom after most of the others have finished. 
                                           
                                          Those are just some suggestions.
                                           
                                          George Klump
                                          Southern California Chapter
                                           
                                           
                                           
                                          ----- Original Message -----
                                          From: Ann Glynn
                                          Sent: Sunday, May 20, 2007 1:12 PM
                                          Subject: [AZ]

                                          This is from the ASK US page, so please send me a CC.  I live in Tocoma Washington, a moderate lheardiness zone.  I want to put small azaleas in my rock garden.  I have been unable to find anything smaller than 3 feet.  What are the manes of the small ones you mention in your qustion and answer section?  Where could I buy some.  Thank you.

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