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Re: [AZ] Bald?

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  • Mary & Bill McDavit
    Joe Schild, Now, all of us bald guys are going to think that we were just unlucky!! I ve often wondered what it was. Bill McDavit - Sunset Lakes, NC - Zone 8
    Message 1 of 7 , Jan 31, 2005
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      Joe Schild,
       
          Now, all of us bald guys are going to think that we were just unlucky!!  I've often wondered what it was.
       
      Bill McDavit - Sunset Lakes, NC - Zone 8
       
      Subject: RE: [AZ] Bald?

      Larry,
      Usually when we refer to a mountain top bald, we are talking about a location with few if any trees and is covered with grass. Wayah Bald does not exactly fit the description, but Gregory Bald does, where cattle were once summer grazed many years ago. Brass Town Bald in North Georgia and Parsson's Bald also fit. Much of Roane Mountain would also fit the description.
       
      I do know from where bald comes from in we humans, for I was lucky and did not inherit the pattern from my father or from my mother's side where all her brothers and her father were bald, like a billiard ball.
       
      Joe Schild-Hixson, TN USDA Zone 7a
      Ask a friend to join the Azalea Society of America!
       
       
    • iffy123
      you are not bald. You just have clear hair. ... From: Mary & Bill McDavit [mailto:osprey1@atmc.net] Sent: Monday, January 31, 2005 7:09 PM To:
      Message 2 of 7 , Feb 1, 2005
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        Message
        you are not bald.  You just have clear hair.
        -----Original Message-----
        From: Mary & Bill McDavit [mailto:osprey1@...]
        Sent: Monday, January 31, 2005 7:09 PM
        To: azaleas@yahoogroups.com
        Subject: Re: [AZ] Bald?

        Joe Schild,
         
            Now, all of us bald guys are going to think that we were just unlucky!!  I've often wondered what it was.
         
        Bill McDavit - Sunset Lakes, NC - Zone 8
         
        Subject: RE: [AZ] Bald?

        Larry,
        Usually when we refer to a mountain top bald, we are talking about a location with few if any trees and is covered with grass. Wayah Bald does not exactly fit the description, but Gregory Bald does, where cattle were once summer grazed many years ago. Brass Town Bald in North Georgia and Parsson's Bald also fit. Much of Roane Mountain would also fit the description.
         
        I do know from where bald comes from in we humans, for I was lucky and did not inherit the pattern from my father or from my mother's side where all her brothers and her father were bald, like a billiard ball.
         
        Joe Schild-Hixson, TN USDA Zone 7a
        Ask a friend to join the Azalea Society of America!
         
         


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      • iffy123
        Interesting threads on BALD. Had not given the thought much effort before. Thanks for another good read and awareness. Barbara 8b ... From: Royster, David
        Message 3 of 7 , Feb 1, 2005
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          Interesting threads on BALD. Had not given the thought much effort before.
          Thanks for another good read and awareness.
          Barbara 8b


          -----Original Message-----
          From: Royster, David [mailto:droyster@...]
          Sent: Monday, January 31, 2005 12:17 PM
          To: azaleas@yahoogroups.com
          Subject: RE: [AZ] Bald?



          In the Appalachian Mountains there are mountaintops that are not covered
          with trees, but instead are covered in grasses and low shrubs - low being a
          relative term.

          There are dozens of high elevation "balds" in the Southern Appalachians. In
          the Smokies, as well as other areas, farmers would drive their livestock to
          the highest balds in the summer. This grazing would keep many of the balds
          free of trees. Today, maintenance of the balds is sometimes the only reason
          that some of these balds still exist. There are a number of groups who will
          help maintain the balds and "fight" to keep an invading army of plants
          taking them over.

          Researchers have looked for evidence of bald creation through burning,
          grazing, climatic factors related to the Wisconsin glaciation, impacts of
          Native Americans and colonial settlers, and effects of mega-fauna during the
          last ice age. The origin of balds remains a mystery, and balds management
          issues are continually debated.

          Unlike Heath Balds which are dominated by shrubs (mostly of the Rhododendron
          family), Grassy Balds are devoid of woody plants and consist of various
          grass and sedge species. Located on high mountain summits, Grassy Balds are
          unique to the Southern Appalachians.

          Because of their uniqueness, along with limited acreage, Grassy Balds are
          considered Globally Rare by The Nature Conservancy. Several rare plant
          species, including Gray's Lily (Lilium grayi), can be found in Grassy balds.


          There are numerous theories on the origins of Grassy Balds, a subject which
          remains controversial and which will probably never be resolved. Equally
          contentious among scientists is what mechanism(s) maintained these balds,
          preventing them from converting into forests. Grassy Balds that are not
          managed will quickly be overtaken by blackberry and other woody species.

          It has been suggested that native large mammals, such as bison and elk, were
          responsible for maintaining these balds; later early settlers grazed the
          same sites with domesticated livestock. It has also been suggested that fire
          can play a critical role in the maintenance of Grassy Balds.

          Obviously, the ones that we find interesting are the Heath Balds.

          droyster

          -----Original Message-----
          From: Larry Wallace [mailto:Larry.Wallace@...]
          Sent: Monday, January 31, 2005 12:08 PM
          To: azaleas@yahoogroups.com
          Subject: [AZ] Bald?


          Wayah Bald, NC,
          Gregory Bald
          What does 'bald' mean in this case? Usually it means 'white'
          or 'white head' i.e. bald eagle, pied/piebald, skewed/skewbald.

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          When you reply to this email, PLEASE quote its relevant part(s) only, as
          context, and DELETE the rest - especially this line and the Yahoo lines.
          Also PLEASE tell us where you garden (city, state or at least your USDA
          zone).

          We welcome images RESIZED to be under 100KB in size - 640 x 480 pixel .jpg
          images at 50% or 1:40 compression are ideal.

          To unsubscribe, send an email to: azaleas-unsubscribe@yahoogroups.com


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