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Re: [AZ] Parentage of Rh. 'Snowbird'

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  • Bob Kelly
    Thanks, John.  That helps. Bob ________________________________ From: sjperk5 To: azaleas@yahoogroups.com Sent: Monday, July 22, 2013
    Message 1 of 5 , Jul 22, 2013
      Thanks, John.  That helps.

      Bob



      From: sjperk5 <sjperk5@...>
      To: azaleas@yahoogroups.com
      Sent: Monday, July 22, 2013 1:24 PM
      Subject: Re: [AZ] Parentage of Rh. 'Snowbird'

       
      Bob

      Both Snowbird and Marydel both flow test as in the normal range for tetraploid deciduous azaleas.

      Both are most likely straight R. atlanticum which is a tetraploid deciduous azalea species.

      Note: Tetraploid do sometimes results from crosses of driploid species by tetraploid sepcies. These mixed cross tetraploids are normally fertile and do then interact with the normal tetraploid population.

      My position is both Snowbird and Marydel are straight R. atlanticum and if they have any diploid blood in them it is very likely from a mixed tetraploid several generation removed.

      In my opinion, both Snowbird and Marydel are too fertile in both directions to be first generation tetrapoloid from a cross of a unreduced diploid by a tetraploid.

      John Perkins
      Salem, NH

      --- In azaleas@yahoogroups.com, Bob Kelly <bkelly66@...> wrote:
      >
      > Thanks, Mike.  I can totally accept that.  I recall that was what happened to Marydel, but Galle id'd Snowbird as atlanticum x canescens.  ;o))
      >
      > Bob
      >
      >
      >
      >
      > ________________________________
      > From: Mike Creel <mikeacreel@...>
      > To: "azaleas@yahoogroups.com" <azaleas@yahoogroups.com>
      > Sent: Monday, July 22, 2013 11:21 AM
      > Subject: Re: [AZ] Parentage of Rh. 'Snowbird'
      >
      >
      >
      >  
      > I have a large colony of Snowbird and I remember initially it was thought to be a hybrid of atlanticum X periclymenoides like the so-called Choptank hybrids.  I remember that Snowbird was somehow proven to be just a good form of pure atlanticum.
      >
      >
      > Our prunifoliums are finishing up and late arborescens are peaking, also Summer Lyric and oblongifolium.  A near yellow prunifolium is still in tight bud, first two buds.
      >
      >  
      > Mike Creel, SC USDA Zone 8a
      > Lexington, South Carolina
      >
      >
      > >________________________________
      > > From: Bob Kelly <bkelly66@...>
      > >To: "azaleas@yahoogroups.com" <azaleas@yahoogroups.com>
      > >Sent: Monday, July 22, 2013 12:13 PM
      > >Subject: [AZ] Parentage of Rh. 'Snowbird'
      > >
      > >
      > >
      > > 
      > >On this cloudy and humid morning, I have been applying mulch and doing a little weeding.  Upon noticing a Rh. 'Snowbird' specimen I am once again in a quandrey as to its parentage.  As I recall it was discovered at Biltmore and assumed to be Rh. atlanticum x rh. canescens (or maybe vice versa)  With what we now believe, the former is very unlikely if not impossible, and the latter would likely result in a triploid which would almost certainly be sterile.  Snowbird is not sterile as it seeds prolifically. It seems to have the appearance of a r. atlanticum or one of the Choptanks that came out of Transplant Nursery.   What does this group think?  Have I missed some discussion of this which resolved the issue?
      > >
      > >
      > >(Rh. prunifolium about to make a show.)
      > >
      > >
      > >Bob Kelly\
      > >Aberdeen, MS(81° F and 91% RH)
      > >
      > >
      >



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