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Bogs seem to dwarf azaleas

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  • Mike Creel
    I have not conducted a big scientific study but I have observed that growing azaleas in bog conditions seems to dwarf them, slowing their growth, keeping them
    Message 1 of 5 , Jul 15, 2013
    I have not conducted a big scientific study but I have observed that growing azaleas in bog conditions seems to dwarf them, slowing their growth, keeping them smaller, but still healthy looking.  For more than five years now I have watched two evergreen azaleas that were rooted simply by sticking a woody cutting in a manmade bog.  One is a Chinzan growing in the corner of a large concrete birdbath (not shown in attached photos).  The other is an unnamed azalea growing in a floating bog pot in our garden pond (shown in one attached photo).

    Now I am trying to root some deciduous native azaleas by sticking woody cuttings (with mature leaves, trimmed) in a new floating pot.  The cuttings are from canadense, viscosum and an evergreen called douible rose macrantha.  I plan to stick more cuttings in a second floating pot, probably atlanticum and occidentale.  My media mix in all cases is 3 parts pine bark soil conditioner, one part coarse washed sand.

    Recently I repotted the evergreen azalea in the floating pot,  I filled the lower part of the pot halfway with pine cones, then topped it off with the bark-sand mix.
     
    Mike Creel, SC USDA Zone 8a
    Lexington, South Carolina
  • sjperk5
    Mike If you go to a bog in New England and study the R. canadense one of the things you will notice is the tallest canadense are the furthest from the open
    Message 2 of 5 , Jul 21, 2013
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      Mike

      If you go to a bog in New England and study the R. canadense one of the things you will notice is the tallest canadense are the furthest from the open water.

      Now this may be because they are the oldest or because they are the most shaded. But there is no denying you can find R. canadense approaching 6 feet tall at the outer limits of the population where 2 to 4 feet is more common for the population as a whole.

      John Perkins
      Salem, NH

      --- In azaleas@yahoogroups.com, Mike Creel <mikeacreel@...> wrote:
      >
      > I have not conducted a big scientific study but I have observed that growing azaleas in bog conditions seems to dwarf them, slowing their growth, keeping them smaller, but still healthy looking.  For more than five years now I have watched two evergreen azaleas that were rooted simply by sticking a woody cutting in a manmade bog.  One is a Chinzan growing in the corner of a large concrete birdbath (not shown in attached photos).  The other is an unnamed azalea growing in a floating bog pot in our garden pond (shown in one attached photo).
      >
      > Now I am trying to root some deciduous native azaleas by sticking woody cuttings (with mature leaves, trimmed) in a new floating pot.  The cuttings are from canadense, viscosum and an evergreen called douible rose macrantha.  I plan to stick more cuttings in a second floating pot, probably atlanticum and occidentale.  My media mix in all cases is 3 parts pine bark soil conditioner, one part coarse washed sand.
      >
      > Recently I repotted the evergreen azalea in the floating pot,  I filled the lower part of the pot halfway with pine cones, then topped it off with the bark-sand mix.
      >
      >  
      > Mike Creel, SC USDA Zone 8a
      > Lexington, South Carolina
      >
    • Mike Creel
      John, I assume that R. canadense will grow well in your New Hampshire yard?  If so, how do you site and plant it, and how does it grow?  Have you tried
      Message 3 of 5 , Jul 21, 2013
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        John, I assume that R. canadense will grow well in your New Hampshire yard?  If so, how do you site and plant it, and how does it grow?  Have you tried growing canadense in a container?  I wish more people gardened with canadense.  I have a small area that I am reserving for canadense, certainly the only plants of the species in the South Carolina, if not the entire Southeast.  My oldest canadense is thriving in a well-draining container, and U have a ground site reserved for it.  The species responds well to the green fertilizer that Harold Greer uses.

        In the wild, does canadense grow in areas of constant water or water that fills and drains, but still stays wet.  I think canadense and other native azaleas will grow in very wet conditions, but not stagnant still water.  The water must rise and fall, staying fresh and oxygen filled.

        R. occidentale at Cunningham Marsh in California seems to thrive in very wet conditions with rising and falling water.  R. canescens on my family farm the the coastal plain of South Carolina grows well on slightly raised hummocks (which are often and for short periods underwater).  The azalea hummocks are often at the edge or in the center of small swamp streams.  In the same area R. viscosum and atlanticum grow in areas often underwater, but the water level does fall.

        Saying all that it is logical and interesting that I can root and grow evergreen and deciduous azaleas in the edge of container bogs and in floating pots.

        Mike Creel, SC USDA Zone 8a
        Lexington, South Carolina

        From: sjperk5 <sjperk5@...>
        To: azaleas@yahoogroups.com
        Sent: Sunday, July 21, 2013 11:56 AM
        Subject: [AZ] Re: Bogs seem to dwarf azaleas

         
        Mike

        If you go to a bog in New England and study the R. canadense one of the things you will notice is the tallest canadense are the furthest from the open water.

        Now this may be because they are the oldest or because they are the most shaded. But there is no denying you can find R. canadense approaching 6 feet tall at the outer limits of the population where 2 to 4 feet is more common for the population as a whole.

        John Perkins
        Salem, NH

        --- In azaleas@yahoogroups.com, Mike Creel <mikeacreel@...> wrote:
        >
        > I have not conducted a big scientific study but I have observed that growing azaleas in bog conditions seems to dwarf them, slowing their growth, keeping them smaller, but still healthy looking.  For more than five years now I have watched two evergreen azaleas that were rooted simply by sticking a woody cutting in a manmade bog.  One is a Chinzan growing in the corner of a large concrete birdbath (not shown in attached photos).  The other is an unnamed azalea growing in a floating bog pot in our garden pond (shown in one attached photo).
        >
        > Now I am trying to root some deciduous native azaleas by sticking woody cuttings (with mature leaves, trimmed) in a new floating pot.  The cuttings are from canadense, viscosum and an evergreen called douible rose macrantha.  I plan to stick more cuttings in a second floating pot, probably atlanticum and occidentale.  My media mix in all cases is 3 parts pine bark soil conditioner, one part coarse washed sand.
        >
        > Recently I repotted the evergreen azalea in the floating pot,  I filled the lower part of the pot halfway with pine cones, then topped it off with the bark-sand mix.
        >
        >  
        > Mike Creel, SC USDA Zone 8a
        > Lexington, South Carolina
        >



      • sjperk5
        R. canadense is relatively easy to grow if you are able to keep it from ever drying out. If you have a area that has constant moisure and you can plant the R.
        Message 4 of 5 , Jul 21, 2013
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          R. canadense is relatively easy to grow if you are able to keep it from ever drying out.

          If you have a area that has constant moisure and you can plant the R. canadense so it is on top but not in the constant moisure you are golden.

          Plus you have to give it basically a full sun location.

          In other words if you have the proper location it is easy to grow and if you do not you cannot grow it. The proper location is constant moisure but not in right in the water in a pretty sunny place.

          We grow it in the neigborhoods yard they have a good wet area.

          We have a friend who has created a bog and he grows more than a 100 R. canadense. They seed in for him.

          You find them in high (elevation wise) wet areas above the low wet areas. In other words if you can find a flat wet are above a pond you can often find R. canadense assuming the area is natural. We have never seen R. canadense in a wet area where there is a lot of grass.

          John Perkins
          Salem, NH

          --- In azaleas@yahoogroups.com, Mike Creel <mikeacreel@...> wrote:
          >
          > John, I assume that R. canadense will grow well in your New Hampshire yard?  If so, how do you site and plant it, and how does it grow?  Have you tried growing canadense in a container?  I wish more people gardened with canadense.  I have a small area that I am reserving for canadense, certainly the only plants of the species in the South Carolina, if not the entire Southeast.  My oldest canadense is thriving in a well-draining container, and U have a ground site reserved for it.  The species responds well to the green fertilizer that Harold Greer uses.
          >
          > In the wild, does canadense grow in areas of constant water or water that fills and drains, but still stays wet.  I think canadense and other native azaleas will grow in very wet conditions, but not stagnant still water.  The water must rise and fall, staying fresh and oxygen filled.
          >
          > R. occidentale at Cunningham Marsh in California seems to thrive in very wet conditions with rising and falling water.  R. canescens on my family farm the the coastal plain of South Carolina grows well on slightly raised hummocks (which are often and for short periods underwater).  The azalea hummocks are often at the edge or in the center of small swamp streams.  In the same area R. viscosum and atlanticum grow in areas often underwater, but the water level does fall.
          >
          > Saying all that it is logical and interesting that I can root and grow evergreen and deciduous azaleas in the edge of container bogs and in floating pots.
          >
          >
          > Mike Creel, SC USDA Zone 8a
          > Lexington, South Carolina
          >
          >
          > >________________________________
          > > From: sjperk5 <sjperk5@...>
          > >To: azaleas@yahoogroups.com
          > >Sent: Sunday, July 21, 2013 11:56 AM
          > >Subject: [AZ] Re: Bogs seem to dwarf azaleas
          > >
          > >
          > >
          > > 
          > >Mike
          > >
          > >If you go to a bog in New England and study the R. canadense one of the things you will notice is the tallest canadense are the furthest from the open water.
          > >
          > >Now this may be because they are the oldest or because they are the most shaded. But there is no denying you can find R. canadense approaching 6 feet tall at the outer limits of the population where 2 to 4 feet is more common for the population as a whole.
          > >
          > >John Perkins
          > >Salem, NH
          > >
          > >--- In azaleas@yahoogroups.com, Mike Creel <mikeacreel@> wrote:
          > >>
          > >> I have not conducted a big scientific study but I have observed that growing azaleas in bog conditions seems to dwarf them, slowing their growth, keeping them smaller, but still healthy looking.  For more than five years now I have watched two evergreen azaleas that were rooted simply by sticking a woody cutting in a manmade bog.  One is a Chinzan growing in the corner of a large concrete birdbath (not shown in attached photos).  The other is an unnamed azalea growing in a floating bog pot in our garden pond (shown in one attached photo).
          > >>
          > >> Now I am trying to root some deciduous native azaleas by sticking woody cuttings (with mature leaves, trimmed) in a new floating pot.  The cuttings are from canadense, viscosum and an evergreen called douible rose macrantha.  I plan to stick more cuttings in a second floating pot, probably atlanticum and occidentale.  My media mix in all cases is 3 parts pine bark soil conditioner, one part coarse washed sand.
          > >>
          > >> Recently I repotted the evergreen azalea in the floating pot,  I filled the lower part of the pot halfway with pine cones, then topped it off with the bark-sand mix.
          > >>
          > >>  
          > >> Mike Creel, SC USDA Zone 8a
          > >> Lexington, South Carolina
          > >>
          > >
          > >
          > >
          > >
          > >
          >
        • sjperk5
          Mike R. canadense is normally found in constantly wet areas that have little or no chance of ever flooding. Hence the statement they are normally located in a
          Message 5 of 5 , Jul 22, 2013
          • 0 Attachment
            Mike

            R. canadense is normally found in constantly wet areas that have little or no chance of ever flooding. Hence the statement they are normally located in a flat wet area above a lower wet area that has the potential to flood.

            In the mountains R. canadense is sometimes found in seeps. You can sometimes climb for a few hundred feet along a path next to a seep and see R. canadense growing on the uphill side of the wet area created by the seep.

            Interestingly R. prinophyllum also likes seeps and bogs and you will somethings find both growing together. Their flower times do overlay but they do not seem to hybridize naturally. The Bradford bog area in New Hampshire is a good location to see both colocated.

            R. viscosum and R. canadense will also colocate in New Hampshire and Massachusetts but to date we no of no location where R. prinophyllum and R. viscosum colocate in New England but there are most likely isolated instances where they do.

            John Perkins
            Salem, NH

            --- In azaleas@yahoogroups.com, "sjperk5" <sjperk5@...> wrote:
            >
            > R. canadense is relatively easy to grow if you are able to keep it from ever drying out.
            >
            > If you have a area that has constant moisure and you can plant the R. canadense so it is on top but not in the constant moisure you are golden.
            >
            > Plus you have to give it basically a full sun location.
            >
            > In other words if you have the proper location it is easy to grow and if you do not you cannot grow it. The proper location is constant moisure but not in right in the water in a pretty sunny place.
            >
            > We grow it in the neigborhoods yard they have a good wet area.
            >
            > We have a friend who has created a bog and he grows more than a 100 R. canadense. They seed in for him.
            >
            > You find them in high (elevation wise) wet areas above the low wet areas. In other words if you can find a flat wet are above a pond you can often find R. canadense assuming the area is natural. We have never seen R. canadense in a wet area where there is a lot of grass.
            >
            > John Perkins
            > Salem, NH
            >
            > --- In azaleas@yahoogroups.com, Mike Creel <mikeacreel@> wrote:
            > >
            > > John, I assume that R. canadense will grow well in your New Hampshire yard?  If so, how do you site and plant it, and how does it grow?  Have you tried growing canadense in a container?  I wish more people gardened with canadense.  I have a small area that I am reserving for canadense, certainly the only plants of the species in the South Carolina, if not the entire Southeast.  My oldest canadense is thriving in a well-draining container, and U have a ground site reserved for it.  The species responds well to the green fertilizer that Harold Greer uses.
            > >
            > > In the wild, does canadense grow in areas of constant water or water that fills and drains, but still stays wet.  I think canadense and other native azaleas will grow in very wet conditions, but not stagnant still water.  The water must rise and fall, staying fresh and oxygen filled.
            > >
            > > R. occidentale at Cunningham Marsh in California seems to thrive in very wet conditions with rising and falling water.  R. canescens on my family farm the the coastal plain of South Carolina grows well on slightly raised hummocks (which are often and for short periods underwater).  The azalea hummocks are often at the edge or in the center of small swamp streams.  In the same area R. viscosum and atlanticum grow in areas often underwater, but the water level does fall.
            > >
            > > Saying all that it is logical and interesting that I can root and grow evergreen and deciduous azaleas in the edge of container bogs and in floating pots.
            > >
            > >
            > > Mike Creel, SC USDA Zone 8a
            > > Lexington, South Carolina
            > >
            > >
            > > >________________________________
            > > > From: sjperk5 <sjperk5@>
            > > >To: azaleas@yahoogroups.com
            > > >Sent: Sunday, July 21, 2013 11:56 AM
            > > >Subject: [AZ] Re: Bogs seem to dwarf azaleas
            > > >
            > > >
            > > >
            > > > 
            > > >Mike
            > > >
            > > >If you go to a bog in New England and study the R. canadense one of the things you will notice is the tallest canadense are the furthest from the open water.
            > > >
            > > >Now this may be because they are the oldest or because they are the most shaded. But there is no denying you can find R. canadense approaching 6 feet tall at the outer limits of the population where 2 to 4 feet is more common for the population as a whole.
            > > >
            > > >John Perkins
            > > >Salem, NH
            > > >
            > > >--- In azaleas@yahoogroups.com, Mike Creel <mikeacreel@> wrote:
            > > >>
            > > >> I have not conducted a big scientific study but I have observed that growing azaleas in bog conditions seems to dwarf them, slowing their growth, keeping them smaller, but still healthy looking.  For more than five years now I have watched two evergreen azaleas that were rooted simply by sticking a woody cutting in a manmade bog.  One is a Chinzan growing in the corner of a large concrete birdbath (not shown in attached photos).  The other is an unnamed azalea growing in a floating bog pot in our garden pond (shown in one attached photo).
            > > >>
            > > >> Now I am trying to root some deciduous native azaleas by sticking woody cuttings (with mature leaves, trimmed) in a new floating pot.  The cuttings are from canadense, viscosum and an evergreen called douible rose macrantha.  I plan to stick more cuttings in a second floating pot, probably atlanticum and occidentale.  My media mix in all cases is 3 parts pine bark soil conditioner, one part coarse washed sand.
            > > >>
            > > >> Recently I repotted the evergreen azalea in the floating pot,  I filled the lower part of the pot halfway with pine cones, then topped it off with the bark-sand mix.
            > > >>
            > > >>  
            > > >> Mike Creel, SC USDA Zone 8a
            > > >> Lexington, South Carolina
            > > >>
            > > >
            > > >
            > > >
            > > >
            > > >
            > >
            >
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