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RE: [AZ] Recommendation for a company to prune azaleas

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  • Harold Greer
    Hello, After many years of pruning azaleas (I actually have been doing this longer than anyone else on this forum), I would suggest just doing a rather brutal
    Message 1 of 4 , Apr 12, 2013

    Hello,

     

    After many years of pruning azaleas (I actually have been doing this longer than anyone else on this forum), I would suggest just doing a rather brutal pruning down to below the height you want them.  With azaleas, you do not have to worry about where the dormant buds are on the stem, just cut them where you want.  If they are healthy plants which they sound like they are, they will grow back well.  Of course prune after they bloom.  Yes, they will look a little rough at first, but you will have better looking plants sooner than pruning a little over a number of years.  As an example I have included a picture of some deciduous azaleas during the winter following the spring they were pruned.  Evergreen azaleas will do the same, just they will still have leaves.  And George is certainly right in don’t pay a landscaper who really probably knows very little about pruning and charges a lot.

     

    And, yes you should fertilize them.  George and I disagree about Cotton seed meal.  I have used it and I think little of it.  I have seen it attract weevil and while it may work for George in Southern California where it seldom freezes, I would generally not recommend applying fertilizer as late as Labor Day in areas where it can freeze fairly hard in early winter as late fertilizing can cause late growth and an early fall freeze can damage the azaleas.  Cotton seed meal does not have enough nitrogen.  Find a slow release fertilizer with a ratio of 10 (nitrogen) 6 (phosphate) 4 (potash) or something close.  We use a 20-12-8 fertilizer with micronutrients that works wonders.  It will beat the pants off of cotton seed meal.  I would challenge George to do a side by side comparison any time.

    Harold Greer

    Greer Gardens

     

    From: azaleas@yahoogroups.com [mailto:azaleas@yahoogroups.com] On Behalf Of George Klump
    Sent: Friday, April 12, 2013 2:50 PM
    To: azaleas@yahoogroups.com; mschiffgens@...
    Subject: Re: [AZ] Recommendation for a company to prune azaleas

     

    12 April 2013

    Hello, Maria,

    There is "no special way that. . . .should be done over a period of several years" which has ever come to my attention.  Anyone can do this and it is not necessary to pay someone a high price to do it.

    The first thing to consider in this case, since the azaleas are still blooming, is to let them finish blooming.  After they have finished blooming, I would take the "leggy" branches and trim them off as close to the main stem as you wish.  Two things can normally be done.  One is to cut the "leggy" branch off right at the main stem, while the other is to cut it close to the main stem [or as close as you wish] maybe just about 1/8th inch above a node.  If you cut it at a 45 degree angle with the top part of the cut on the outside, the branch will usually grow out from that.  If you want the plant to fill itself in a bit more, i.e. thicken a bit more toward the center, then, cut the 45 degree angle with the top part of the angle on the inside of the cut, that is, toward the plant itself. 

    After that has been done, you might want to look into getting some cottonseed meal, spread about a cupful around each azalea and water that in gently.  We do that three times annually here, Easter, Fourth of July and Labor Day.  More is not needed.  I do this to all the plants in my own garden and they grow and bloom beautifully.  That is, I do this to my camellias, azaleas, rhododendrons, roses, angel wing begonias. . . .all of them.  Cottonseed meal is a good organic fertilizer of very slow release and does not burn the plants, when properly administered.  You might want to water the soil around the plants first before you put the cottonseed meal down and, then, water the cottonseed meal in gently.  Having the ground wet around the plants helps. 

    If you feel like doing this yourself, just take some sharp garden scissors and begin.  You should be just as successful as some high priced landscaper.

    George E. Klump
    Southern California Chapter, ARS/ASA







    On 4/12/2013 1:49 PM, Maria K. Schiffgens wrote:

    Subject:

    [AZ] Recommendation for a company to prune azaleas

    From:

    "Maria K. Schiffgens" <mschiffgens@...>

    Date:

    4/12/2013 1:11 PM

     

    To:

    "azaleas@yahoogroups.com" <azaleas@yahoogroups.com>

     

     

    Hello,

    I live in Atlanta and have some fairly old azaleas (15 years old, or so) in our yard which are badly in need of trimming.

    (They are still blooming, but are getting “leggy” looking.)

     

    We do not want to do this trimming ourselves, as we have been told that there is a special way that it should be done over a period of several years to minimize damage to the plants.

     

    Do you know of someone in the Atlanta area who might be able to recommend a landscape/yard maintenance company in Atlanta that we can hire to trim them for us?

     

    Thank you.

     

    Maria Schiffgens

     


    Maria K. Schiffgens
    Paralegal
    Goodman McGuffey Lindsey & Johnson, LLP

    Dire

     

     

     

  • Charles Barrett
    Thank you ... Thank you On Apr 13, 2013, at 1:13 AM, Harold Greer wrote: Hello, After many years of pruning azaleas (I actually
    Message 2 of 4 , Apr 13, 2013
      Thank you

      On Apr 13, 2013, at 1:13 AM, "Harold Greer" <hgreer@...> wrote:

       

      Hello,

       

      After many years of pruning azaleas (I actually have been doing this longer than anyone else on this forum), I would suggest just doing a rather brutal pruning down to below the height you want them.  With azaleas, you do not have to worry about where the dormant buds are on the stem, just cut them where you want.  If they are healthy plants which they sound like they are, they will grow back well.  Of course prune after they bloom.  Yes, they will look a little rough at first, but you will have better looking plants sooner than pruning a little over a number of years.  As an example I have included a picture of some deciduous azaleas during the winter following the spring they were pruned.  Evergreen azaleas will do the same, just they will still have leaves.  And George is certainly right in don’t pay a landscaper who really probably knows very little about pruning and charges a lot.

       

      And, yes you should fertilize them.  George and I disagree about Cotton seed meal.  I have used it and I think little of it.  I have seen it attract weevil and while it may work for George in Southern California where it seldom freezes, I would generally not recommend applying fertilizer as late as Labor Day in areas where it can freeze fairly hard in early winter as late fertilizing can cause late growth and an early fall freeze can damage the azaleas.  Cotton seed meal does not have enough nitrogen.  Find a slow release fertilizer with a ratio of 10 (nitrogen) 6 (phosphate) 4 (potash) or something close.  We use a 20-12-8 fertilizer with micronutrients that works wonders.  It will beat the pants off of cotton seed meal.  I would challenge George to do a side by side comparison any time.

      Harold Greer

      Greer Gardens

       

      From: azaleas@yahoogroups.com [mailto:azaleas@yahoogroups.com] On Behalf Of George Klump
      Sent: Friday, April 12, 2013 2:50 PM
      To: azaleas@yahoogroups.com; mschiffgens@...
      Subject: Re: [AZ] Recommendation for a company to prune azaleas

       

      12 April 2013

      Hello, Maria,

      There is "no special way that. . . .should be done over a period of several years" which has ever come to my attention.  Anyone can do this and it is not necessary to pay someone a high price to do it.

      The first thing to consider in this case, since the azaleas are still blooming, is to let them finish blooming.  After they have finished blooming, I would take the "leggy" branches and trim them off as close to the main stem as you wish.  Two things can normally be done.  One is to cut the "leggy" branch off right at the main stem, while the other is to cut it close to the main stem [or as close as you wish] maybe just about 1/8th inch above a node.  If you cut it at a 45 degree angle with the top part of the cut on the outside, the branch will usually grow out from that.  If you want the plant to fill itself in a bit more, i.e. thicken a bit more toward the center, then, cut the 45 degree angle with the top part of the angle on the inside of the cut, that is, toward the plant itself. 

      After that has been done, you might want to look into getting some cottonseed meal, spread about a cupful around each azalea and water that in gently.  We do that three times annually here, Easter, Fourth of July and Labor Day.  More is not needed.  I do this to all the plants in my own garden and they grow and bloom beautifully.  That is, I do this to my camellias, azaleas, rhododendrons, roses, angel wing begonias. . . .all of them.  Cottonseed meal is a good organic fertilizer of very slow release and does not burn the plants, when properly administered.  You might want to water the soil around the plants first before you put the cottonseed meal down and, then, water the cottonseed meal in gently.  Having the ground wet around the plants helps. 

      If you feel like doing this yourself, just take some sharp garden scissors and begin.  You should be just as successful as some high priced landscaper.

      George E. Klump
      Southern California Chapter, ARS/ASA







      On 4/12/2013 1:49 PM, Maria K. Schiffgens wrote:

      Subject:

      [AZ] Recommendation for a company to prune azaleas

      From:

      "Maria K. Schiffgens" <mschiffgens@...>

      Date:

      4/12/2013 1:11 PM

       

      To:

      "azaleas@yahoogroups.com" <azaleas@yahoogroups.com>

       

       

      Hello,

      I live in Atlanta and have some fairly old azaleas (15 years old, or so) in our yard which are badly in need of trimming.

      (They are still blooming, but are getting “leggy” looking.)

       

      We do not want to do this trimming ourselves, as we have been told that there is a special way that it should be done over a period of several years to minimize damage to the plants.

       

      Do you know of someone in the Atlanta area who might be able to recommend a landscape/yard maintenance company in Atlanta that we can hire to trim them for us?

       

      Thank you.

       

      Maria Schiffgens

       


      Maria K. Schiffgens
      Paralegal
      Goodman McGuffey Lindsey & Johnson, LLP

      <image001.jpg>

      Dire

       

       

       

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