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Re: [AZ] natives

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  • Mike Creel
    It is likely, apparently, for R. flammeum Hazel Hamilton OP to produce yellow progeny, around 50 percent, as I have found from growing out several seedlings 
    Message 1 of 7 , Jan 8, 2013
      It is likely, apparently, for R. flammeum Hazel Hamilton OP to produce yellow progeny, around 50 percent, as I have found from growing out several seedlings  from Ray Head's plant.  And the seedlings that were not totally  yellow have all been brightly colored and well marked, keepers in my eyes.  I will try to find some photos and send them to you.  Sometime back I did post some messages with my seedling I call Hazeline.
       
      Mike Creel, SC USDA Zone 8a
      Lexington, South Carolina
      From: turniptown <turniptown75@...>
      To: azaleas@yahoogroups.com
      Sent: Tuesday, January 8, 2013 7:09 PM
      Subject: Re: [AZ] natives

       
        Mike my yellow ones have not bloomed. They were collected from a plant that very well could be the original Hazel plant. I feel fairly certain it is. The plant is marked with a yellow ribbon at the base. The marking has been there for a long time. Most of the older people that were there when the park was established have since died. The Lions club is in the process of "freshing " up the park.


      --- In mailto:azaleas%40yahoogroups.com, Mike Creel wrote:
      >
      > Flammeum is prone to forming multiple flower bud clusters, often making ball trusses in better forms.  Have your yellow flammeum seedlings bloomed, or were they grown from seed collected from a yellow flammeum. I have a few excellent yellow flammeums grown from open pollinated seed from Ray Head's Hazel Hamilton plant in Rutherfordton, NC.  One seems to have larger flowers and a deeper yellow blotch.   Is the original Hazel Hamilton plant at the Hamilton garden in Hiawasee tagged or its location known?
      >
      >
      > Mike Creel, SC USDA Zone 8a
      > Lexington, South Carolina
      >
      >
      > >________________________________
      > >From: bill butts
      > >To: "mailto:azaleas%40yahoogroups.com"
      > >Sent: Tuesday, January 8, 2013 6:33 PM
      > >Subject: Re: [AZ] natives
      > >
      > > 
      > >I collected these at Hamilton Rhododendron garden in Hiawassee. The mother plant was around 8ft, but the planted would have to be around 30 years old. I also have some yellow seedling coming along that I did a few years ago. I collected these off of another plant. The plant was shorter and smaller overall about 6ft. Most of the plants growing at Hamilton would have to be between 20-30 years old. I was thinking both might be flammeum. Both were in bloom around the first of May.
      > >
      > >
      > >
      > >
      > >
      > >________________________________
      > >From: Joe Schild
      > >To: mailto:azaleas%40yahoogroups.com
      > >Sent: Tuesday, January 8, 2013 4:41 PM
      > >Subject: Re: [AZ] natives
      > >
      > > 
      > >Bill,
      > >R.flammeum does tend to break branches more than, say, R. calendulaceum, but no so much as R. cuberlandense. The latter is known for its horizontal branching habit to the point of being rather twiggy.
      > > 
      > >Did you collect your seed from the Ellijay area, perhaps near Lake Lanier? I recall seeing R. flammeum on several of the islands at that lake and the area is near the northern limits of this species. Of course that sighting was back in the late 60's or early 70's while fishing the lake for the rock fish.
      > > 
      > >As a side note, the Flame azalea tends to grow like a tree. The cumberlandense tends to grow more fully and fill out nicely. I used the Cumberland A. in crosses with a number of other species but mostly with R. arborescens which yielded large numbers of fragrant oinks, oranges and one yellow and nearly all had the compact twiggy growth habit.
      > > 
      > >I hope this helps.
      > > 
      > >Joe Schild-Hixson, TN
      > >----- Original Message -----
      > >>From: turniptown
      > >>To: mailto:azaleas%40yahoogroups.com
      > >>Sent: Monday, January 07, 2013 10:26 PM
      > >>Subject: [AZ] natives
      > >>
      > >> 
      > >>I am currently growing a batch of seedling, which I believe to be flammeum. I have grown seedling from various plants the last few years , but these have a lot of branching for seedlings. Is this common for flammeum?Bill ButtsEllijay, Georgia
      > >
      >

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