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Re: [AZ] Recognizing deficiency

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  • William C. Miller III
    Hi Ken, I ll take a stab at this. I assume the plant is in the ground? Was it newly planted or is it well established? What is the deciduous plant --- some
    Message 1 of 5 , Jul 9, 2012
      Hi Ken,

      I'll take a stab at this.

      I assume the plant is in the ground?  Was it newly planted or is it well established?  What is the deciduous plant --- some kind of native --- or an Exbury?   Is this the only plant in all of your plants that is showing this behavior?  Or, is it a general condition with most of  your plants?

      If your spring foliage didn't have this problem, I don't believe you can attribute the lack of green color on subsequent leaves on a nutritional deficiency.  This latest batch of leaves has just gone through high temperatures with minimal rain which is pretty stressful.  It may well be that chlorophyll production has been struggling and just needs a little time to catch up.  If my theory is correct, the problem will self-resolve.

      In the mean time, you might consider foliar feeding with your favorite water soluble fertilizer --- a really dilute solution --- just poured over the leaves.

      William C. Miller III
      Bethesda, Maryland
      www.theazaleaworks.com
      
      
      knmajer wrote:
       

      I realize this has probably been covered before, but I forgot. When you see just the new growth on a deciduous azalea light green or yellowish. The growth that was put on this Spring looks great, it's the additional growth being put on now. What is the problem and cure? Thanks!

      Ken Majer
      Cosby, TN zone 6b



    • Ken Majer
      Bill, The few are natives (bakeri, prunifolium & pinxter) in the ground 2 to 7 years at least 200 apart. Most of my plants are OK. Ken
      Message 2 of 5 , Jul 10, 2012

        Bill,

         

        The few are natives (bakeri, prunifolium & pinxter) in the ground 2 to 7 years at least 200’ apart.  Most of my plants are OK.

         

        Ken

      • Larry Wallace
        Eastern North America is generally deficient in Magnesium. Magnesium affects iron uptake. One cup Epsom Salts per plant would be helpful with a little Iron
        Message 3 of 5 , Jul 10, 2012
          Eastern North America is generally deficient in Magnesium.  Magnesium affects iron uptake.  One cup Epsom Salts per plant would be helpful with a little Iron Sufate (copperas).  Epsom Salts is MgSO4-7(H2O).  Being hydrated the amount of MG isn't so large.  The best price would be the pharmacy at Wallmart.

          I think the yellow new growth may be normal in some plants.  I have one with deep green leaves, looks very healthy, and has yelloiwish new growth.


          Larry Wallace
          Cincinnati


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