Loading ...
Sorry, an error occurred while loading the content.

New Red Azalea

Expand Messages
  • George Klump
    This is from the ASK US page, so please send me a cc. For Mothers Day I received a beautiful large evergreen red azalea. I transplanted it outside in a sunny
    Message 1 of 5 , Aug 16, 2011
    • 0 Attachment
      This is from the ASK US page, so please send me a cc.

      For Mothers Day I received a beautiful large evergreen red azalea. I
      transplanted it outside in a sunny place. It is growing and looks
      great. I have fertilized with Miracle Grow. My question is, I am in
      central Minnesota zip 55398 where the winter temps can get to 20 below
      and possibly heavy snow, what do I do. We winter in Arizona so it
      can't be brought into the house [it would be too large anyway]. Do I
      cut it back to the ground, leave it the way it is, cover the whole
      plant or just the roots with mulch. We leave MN in October so want to
      do whatever I can so it will survive. I love the plant.

      Thanks for your help!
      Beatrice Bigley
      4biglee@...

      Dear Beatrice,

      Thanks for writing to the azalea group.  I do not have your climate here, but I have lived where it can get plenty cold in the winter, e.g. upstate New York with lots of snow.  I used to use Miraclegro and Miracid myself, but long ago saw the error of my ways and repented.

      Azaleas can withstand some rather cold temperatures, assuming they are the variety fit for the climate in which they are sold.  Allowing that your red azalea is most likely in that category, i.e. fit for your climate, it is probably best left alone where you have planted it. 

      I would suggest this, however.  Even if your soil is acidic, and I trust that it is, I would mulch it with some spaghnum peat moss, perlite and shredded bark of some kind probably in parts like this: 1 - 1 - 2, the shredded bark being 2, and do this strictly by volume.  Keep the mulch below the crown of the azalea at least a good full inch.  I would take some cottonseed meal and put a cup or so around it and water that in gently at this time, since you are likely to get a freeze in October, maybe even before you leave for Arizona.  I would not wait to do that.  Be careful around the base of the azalea, since the roots of Ericacae tend to stay close to the surface of the soil. . . .which means that you must be very careful about disrupting the soil too close to the plant itself.  Just at the dripline and beyond should be fine.  Be very careful inside the dripline!!!  Work that into the soil as best you can at this point and water it like there's no tomorrow.  Azaleas will take all the water they can get SO LONG AS the water drains away from the root zone about as fast as it comes in.  Working the mixture into the soil all around the azalea will assure that the mulch will not be blown away by winter winds.  If it is just left to sit on top of the soil, winds can blow it away and that won't do the plant any good at all. 

      Here's the real problem.  Winter winds can desiccate an azalea [or any plant] in a hurry, especially if the root zone is on the dry side and sometimes even if it isn't dry.  This means that you will have to make very sure that the azalea does NOT dry out significantly at any time during the winter.  You might want to bribe a neighbor to come over periodically and water it thoroughly.  If you have lots of snowfall and the azalea is covered [and the roots are therefore reasonably wet, too], the snow will protect the plant.  If there is little or no snow and a cold wind comes up, hit the root zone immediately [if not, sooner] with plenty of water to prevent desiccation.  Your neighbor will know this and encourage him/her to water the azalea forthwith.  If this is not done, then, it is nearly axiomatic that the azalea will not survive the winter with you gone. 

      Assuming you are able to arrange for watering during the time you are gone and the azalea thrives because of it, then, when you return and the chance of a freeze is reasonably passed, then, I would feed it only three times using cottonseed meal.  My own schedule is Easter, Fourth of July and Labor Day.  For you in your climate, I would suggest that Easter could be a bit early some years, so wait a tad until hard freezes are a thing of the past.  Guessing, I might say very late April or early May.  Then, Fourth of July and mid-August, NOT Labor Day, since that may be too close to your coming freezing weather.  Cottonseed meal is organic, slow acting and will not burn the plant, if applied properly as suggested above here.  It will also promote the microbial action in the soil which the azalea will need to turn nutrients into water soluble forms the feeder roots can use.  New growth must have some time to harden off a bit, since it is on the new growth where you will find next year's flowers.  So don't prune the new growth off for anyone.  And I also assume, as I indicated at the beginning of this tome, that your azalea is likely to be of a kind which will take your winters.  Does it have a label on it which tells what kind it is? 

      Those are my suggestions to save the azalea so that it can safely survive your winters there.

      George E. Klump
      Southern California Chapter, ARS/ASA
    • Nicholas Yarmoshuk
      George s advice is always on the the mark . . . . .. . . But . . . . if that azalea came to you on Mother s Day in full bloom it may well have been a
      Message 2 of 5 , Aug 16, 2011
      • 0 Attachment
        George's advice is always on the the mark . . . . .. . .  But . . . . if that azalea came to you on Mother's Day in full bloom it may well have been a "florist's azalea that is not likely to be frost hardy.     Before I decide to leave it in the ground in Minnesota I would ask a knowledgeable person (in the place where it was purchased) what variety it is.   When we know the variety we can then make a more informed recommendation.   If it came from a floral shop then it is most likely not hardy in Minnesota.

        Nick Yarmoshuk, near Niagara Falls Canada,
        in St. Catharines ON Canada, where florist azaleas
         die if kept outdoors in the winter . . . and it is somewhat
         milder here than it is in Minnesota.





        On Tue, Aug 16, 2011 at 4:58 PM, George Klump <mixturev@...> wrote:
         

        This is from the ASK US page, so please send me a cc.

        For Mothers Day I received a beautiful large evergreen red azalea. I
        transplanted it outside in a sunny place. It is growing and looks
        great. I have fertilized with Miracle Grow. My question is, I am in
        central Minnesota zip 55398 where the winter temps can get to 20 below
        and possibly heavy snow, what do I do. We winter in Arizona so it
        can't be brought into the house [it would be too large anyway]. Do I
        cut it back to the ground, leave it the way it is, cover the whole
        plant or just the roots with mulch. We leave MN in October so want to
        do whatever I can so it will survive. I love the plant.

        Thanks for your help!
        Beatrice Bigley
        4biglee@...

        Dear Beatrice,

        Thanks for writing to the azalea group.  I do not have your climate here, but I have lived where it can get plenty cold in the winter, e.g. upstate New York with lots of snow.  I used to use Miraclegro and Miracid myself, but long ago saw the error of my ways and repented.

        Azaleas can withstand some rather cold temperatures, assuming they are the variety fit for the climate in which they are sold.  Allowing that your red azalea is most likely in that category, i.e. fit for your climate, it is probably best left alone where you have planted it. 

        I would suggest this, however.  Even if your soil is acidic, and I trust that it is, I would mulch it with some spaghnum peat moss, perlite and shredded bark of some kind probably in parts like this: 1 - 1 - 2, the shredded bark being 2, and do this strictly by volume.  Keep the mulch below the crown of the azalea at least a good full inch.  I would take some cottonseed meal and put a cup or so around it and water that in gently at this time, since you are likely to get a freeze in October, maybe even before you leave for Arizona.  I would not wait to do that.  Be careful around the base of the azalea, since the roots of Ericacae tend to stay close to the surface of the soil. . . .which means that you must be very careful about disrupting the soil too close to the plant itself.  Just at the dripline and beyond should be fine.  Be very careful inside the dripline!!!  Work that into the soil as best you can at this point and water it like there's no tomorrow.  Azaleas will take all the water they can get SO LONG AS the water drains away from the root zone about as fast as it comes in.  Working the mixture into the soil all around the azalea will assure that the mulch will not be blown away by winter winds.  If it is just left to sit on top of the soil, winds can blow it away and that won't do the plant any good at all. 

        Here's the real problem.  Winter winds can desiccate an azalea [or any plant] in a hurry, especially if the root zone is on the dry side and sometimes even if it isn't dry.  This means that you will have to make very sure that the azalea does NOT dry out significantly at any time during the winter.  You might want to bribe a neighbor to come over periodically and water it thoroughly.  If you have lots of snowfall and the azalea is covered [and the roots are therefore reasonably wet, too], the snow will protect the plant.  If there is little or no snow and a cold wind comes up, hit the root zone immediately [if not, sooner] with plenty of water to prevent desiccation.  Your neighbor will know this and encourage him/her to water the azalea forthwith.  If this is not done, then, it is nearly axiomatic that the azalea will not survive the winter with you gone. 

        Assuming you are able to arrange for watering during the time you are gone and the azalea thrives because of it, then, when you return and the chance of a freeze is reasonably passed, then, I would feed it only three times using cottonseed meal.  My own schedule is Easter, Fourth of July and Labor Day.  For you in your climate, I would suggest that Easter could be a bit early some years, so wait a tad until hard freezes are a thing of the past.  Guessing, I might say very late April or early May.  Then, Fourth of July and mid-August, NOT Labor Day, since that may be too close to your coming freezing weather.  Cottonseed meal is organic, slow acting and will not burn the plant, if applied properly as suggested above here.  It will also promote the microbial action in the soil which the azalea will need to turn nutrients into water soluble forms the feeder roots can use.  New growth must have some time to harden off a bit, since it is on the new growth where you will find next year's flowers.  So don't prune the new growth off for anyone.  And I also assume, as I indicated at the beginning of this tome, that your azalea is likely to be of a kind which will take your winters.  Does it have a label on it which tells what kind it is? 

        Those are my suggestions to save the azalea so that it can safely survive your winters there.

        George E. Klump
        Southern California Chapter, ARS/ASA




        --

        WebRep
        Overall rating
         

      • Nicholas Yarmoshuk
        Stewartstonian is hardy in my area and has experienced temps of -20C (-4F) in my yard. Minnesota winters can be very much more severe. Using styrofoam as a
        Message 3 of 5 , Aug 17, 2011
        • 0 Attachment
          Stewartstonian is hardy in my area and has experienced temps of -20C  (-4F) in my yard.
          Minnesota winters can be very much more severe.  
          Using styrofoam as a winter protection is very interesting.   Normally, plastic around a plant, without ventilation, will surely cook the plant under intense winter sun . . .  and then freeze the warmed tissues at night.    I would never put styrofoam around any plant especially an azalea.  The heat buildup inside from the winter sun can be pretty intense.  Instead, one normally uses burlap to cover the plant to avoid both wind dessication and winter leaf burn.  I must say that I never have covered my some 50+ evergreen azaleas. Temperatures here over the past 35 years have been known to get down to -10F (-23C).

          Mike Creel's comment about fertilizing late in the summer is very accurate.  I believe George also mentioned that.

          I would recommend you water your azalea very well in the fall - assuming you have excellent drainage - and be sure to cover the plant well with burlap shortly after the very first killing frost.

          Nick Yarmoshuk
          St. Catharines ON Canada,
          near Niagara Falls Canada.




          On Tue, Aug 16, 2011 at 6:13 PM, Cliff & Bea Bigley <4biglee@...> wrote:
          Hi, Thanks to both of you for responding. It was in full bloom on Mother's Day.  It is a "spring boomer"  evergreen, stewartstonian.  Hardy to 10 below.  I believe it was   purchased at Home Depot because there is a Home Depot web address on the instructions that came on the plant.  Would the "1 year guarantee" Be good over winter??? That's a joke?
          Roses here survive over winter when a styrafoam box is put on top of them for the winter.  Not possible of an azalea?
          I am getting worried now.
          Thanks for your quick responses,
          Beatrice Bigley

          On Aug 16, 2011, at 2:35 PM, Nicholas Yarmoshuk wrote:

          George's advice is always on the the mark . . . . .. . .  But . . . . if that azalea came to you on Mother's Day in full bloom it may well have been a "florist's azalea that is not likely to be frost hardy.     Before I decide to leave it in the ground in Minnesota I would ask a knowledgeable person (in the place where it was purchased) what variety it is.   When we know the variety we can then make a more informed recommendation.   If it came from a floral shop then it is most likely not hardy in Minnesota.

          Nick Yarmoshuk, near Niagara Falls Canada,
          in St. Catharines ON Canada, where florist azaleas
           die if kept outdoors in the winter . . . and it is somewhat
           milder here than it is in Minnesota.





          On Tue, Aug 16, 2011 at 4:58 PM, George Klump <mixturev@...> wrote:
           

          This is from the ASK US page, so please send me a cc.

          For Mothers Day I received a beautiful large evergreen red azalea. I
          transplanted it outside in a sunny place. It is growing and looks
          great. I have fertilized with Miracle Grow. My question is, I am in
          central Minnesota zip 55398 where the winter temps can get to 20 below
          and possibly heavy snow, what do I do. We winter in Arizona so it
          can't be brought into the house [it would be too large anyway]. Do I
          cut it back to the ground, leave it the way it is, cover the whole
          plant or just the roots with mulch. We leave MN in October so want to
          do whatever I can so it will survive. I love the plant.

          Thanks for your help!
          Beatrice Bigley
          4biglee@...

          Dear Beatrice,

          Thanks for writing to the azalea group.  I do not have your climate here, but I have lived where it can get plenty cold in the winter, e.g. upstate New York with lots of snow.  I used to use Miraclegro and Miracid myself, but long ago saw the error of my ways and repented.

          Azaleas can withstand some rather cold temperatures, assuming they are the variety fit for the climate in which they are sold.  Allowing that your red azalea is most likely in that category, i.e. fit for your climate, it is probably best left alone where you have planted it. 

          I would suggest this, however.  Even if your soil is acidic, and I trust that it is, I would mulch it with some spaghnum peat moss, perlite and shredded bark of some kind probably in parts like this: 1 - 1 - 2, the shredded bark being 2, and do this strictly by volume.  Keep the mulch below the crown of the azalea at least a good full inch.  I would take some cottonseed meal and put a cup or so around it and water that in gently at this time, since you are likely to get a freeze in October, maybe even before you leave for Arizona.  I would not wait to do that.  Be careful around the base of the azalea, since the roots of Ericacae tend to stay close to the surface of the soil. . . .which means that you must be very careful about disrupting the soil too close to the plant itself.  Just at the dripline and beyond should be fine.  Be very careful inside the dripline!!!  Work that into the soil as best you can at this point and water it like there's no tomorrow.  Azaleas will take all the water they can get SO LONG AS the water drains away from the root zone about as fast as it comes in.  Working the mixture into the soil all around the azalea will assure that the mulch will not be blown away by winter winds.  If it is just left to sit on top of the soil, winds can blow it away and that won't do the plant any good at all. 

          Here's the real problem.  Winter winds can desiccate an azalea [or any plant] in a hurry, especially if the root zone is on the dry side and sometimes even if it isn't dry.  This means that you will have to make very sure that the azalea does NOT dry out significantly at any time during the winter.  You might want to bribe a neighbor to come over periodically and water it thoroughly.  If you have lots of snowfall and the azalea is covered [and the roots are therefore reasonably wet, too], the snow will protect the plant.  If there is little or no snow and a cold wind comes up, hit the root zone immediately [if not, sooner] with plenty of water to prevent desiccation.  Your neighbor will know this and encourage him/her to water the azalea forthwith.  If this is not done, then, it is nearly axiomatic that the azalea will not survive the winter with you gone. 

          Assuming you are able to arrange for watering during the time you are gone and the azalea thrives because of it, then, when you return and the chance of a freeze is reasonably passed, then, I would feed it only three times using cottonseed meal.  My own schedule is Easter, Fourth of July and Labor Day.  For you in your climate, I would suggest that Easter could be a bit early some years, so wait a tad until hard freezes are a thing of the past.  Guessing, I might say very late April or early May.  Then, Fourth of July and mid-August, NOT Labor Day, since that may be too close to your coming freezing weather.  Cottonseed meal is organic, slow acting and will not burn the plant, if applied properly as suggested above here.  It will also promote the microbial action in the soil which the azalea will need to turn nutrients into water soluble forms the feeder roots can use.  New growth must have some time to harden off a bit, since it is on the new growth where you will find next year's flowers.  So don't prune the new growth off for anyone.  And I also assume, as I indicated at the beginning of this tome, that your azalea is likely to be of a kind which will take your winters.  Does it have a label on it which tells what kind it is? 

          Those are my suggestions to save the azalea so that it can safely survive your winters there.

          George E. Klump
          Southern California Chapter, ARS/ASA




          --

          WebRep
          Overall rating
           





          --

          WebRep
          Overall rating
           

        • Tadeusz Dauksza
          Bea In the Golden Gopher State;     If this is your first time in trying to grow azaleas in Zimmerman, I hate to be a bearer of bad news, I personally think
          Message 4 of 5 , Aug 17, 2011
          • 0 Attachment
            Bea In the Golden Gopher State;
             
              If this is your first time in trying to grow azaleas in Zimmerman, I hate to be a bearer of bad news, I personally think that your Stewartstonian will be done by next year---  but please do not despair --  first let me list some items that I think will cause the demise of your evergreen azalea;
             
             1. most likely your evergreen was grown in Cornelious or Banks, Oregon , totally different
                 climate than the "Frozen Thundra" where u live--       if this Stewartsonian  was grown say in Holland ,Michigan than U would have a chance.
             
              2. grown in pots there (Cornelious ,OR)  it was watered and "continuasly" fed  with fertilizer
             
              3. when you planted that azalea into ur  "native" soil, those encircled roots from the pot when u bought from the Box store (hOME Depot) have no chance to seek nutrients and water from your soil.
             
              4. Winter brings other problems for ur azalea-- BRR Rabbits, Voles, Bambi you might even have Lemmings there as well, lack of snow cover (maybe) will dessicate the leaves, although if there is lots of snow (good news- protection) will help,  
             
             5. Try Nick's suggestion with that Burlap-- it will be better than the cones.
             
            ------------------------------------------------------------------
             
              Now for some feel good info ---- when u get a chance do bring-up msg # 11854 from the azalea group and do read that msg, and most of all drive  25 miles and visit Erva Hance and see in the spring her beautiful display of close to 1,000 azaleas that she grows in Buffalo.
             
            Take care and good Luck
             
            Tadeusz-Lake Michigan Chapter ASA- join us---  www.azaleas.org
             
             

            From: Nicholas Yarmoshuk <rhodosrus@...>
            To: Cliff & Bea Bigley <4biglee@...>; azaleas@yahoogroups.com
            Cc: mixturev@...
            Sent: Wednesday, August 17, 2011 2:44 AM
            Subject: Re: [AZ] New Red Azalea

             
            Stewartstonian is hardy in my area and has experienced temps of -20C  (-4F) in my yard.
            Minnesota winters can be very much more severe.  
            Using styrofoam as a winter protection is very interesting.   Normally, plastic around a plant, without ventilation, will surely cook the plant under intense winter sun . . .  and then freeze the warmed tissues at night.    I would never put styrofoam around any plant especially an azalea.  The heat buildup inside from the winter sun can be pretty intense.  Instead, one normally uses burlap to cover the plant to avoid both wind dessication and winter leaf burn.  I must say that I never have covered my some 50+ evergreen azaleas. Temperatures here over the past 35 years have been known to get down to -10F (-23C).

            Mike Creel's comment about fertilizing late in the summer is very accurate.  I believe George also mentioned that.

            I would recommend you water your azalea very well in the fall - assuming you have excellent drainage - and be sure to cover the plant well with burlap shortly after the very first killing frost.

            Nick Yarmoshuk
            St. Catharines ON Canada,
            near Niagara Falls Canada.




            On Tue, Aug 16, 2011 at 6:13 PM, Cliff & Bea Bigley <4biglee@...> wrote:
            Hi, Thanks to both of you for responding. It was in full bloom on Mother's Day.  It is a "spring boomer"  evergreen, stewartstonian.  Hardy to 10 below.  I believe it was   purchased at Home Depot because there is a Home Depot web address on the instructions that came on the plant.  Would the "1 year guarantee" Be good over winter??? That's a joke?
            Roses here survive over winter when a styrafoam box is put on top of them for the winter.  Not possible of an azalea?
            I am getting worried now.
            Thanks for your quick responses,
            Beatrice Bigley

            On Aug 16, 2011, at 2:35 PM, Nicholas Yarmoshuk wrote:

            George's advice is always on the the mark . . . . .. . .  But . . . . if that azalea came to you on Mother's Day in full bloom it may well have been a "florist's azalea that is not likely to be frost hardy.     Before I decide to leave it in the ground in Minnesota I would ask a knowledgeable person (in the place where it was purchased) what variety it is.   When we know the variety we can then make a more informed recommendation.   If it came from a floral shop then it is most likely not hardy in Minnesota.

            Nick Yarmoshuk, near Niagara Falls Canada,
            in St. Catharines ON Canada, where florist azaleas
             die if kept outdoors in the winter . . . and it is somewhat
             milder here than it is in Minnesota.





            On Tue, Aug 16, 2011 at 4:58 PM, George Klump <mixturev@...> wrote:
             
            This is from the ASK US page, so please send me a cc.

            For Mothers Day I received a beautiful large evergreen red azalea. I
            transplanted it outside in a sunny place. It is growing and looks
            great. I have fertilized with Miracle Grow. My question is, I am in
            central Minnesota zip 55398 where the winter temps can get to 20 below
            and possibly heavy snow, what do I do. We winter in Arizona so it
            can't be brought into the house [it would be too large anyway]. Do I
            cut it back to the ground, leave it the way it is, cover the whole
            plant or just the roots with mulch. We leave MN in October so want to
            do whatever I can so it will survive. I love the plant.

            Thanks for your help!
            Beatrice Bigley
            4biglee@...

            Dear Beatrice,

            Thanks for writing to the azalea group.  I do not have your climate here, but I have lived where it can get plenty cold in the winter, e.g. upstate New York with lots of snow.  I used to use Miraclegro and Miracid myself, but long ago saw the error of my ways and repented.

            Azaleas can withstand some rather cold temperatures, assuming they are the variety fit for the climate in which they are sold.  Allowing that your red azalea is most likely in that category, i.e. fit for your climate, it is probably best left alone where you have planted it. 

            I would suggest this, however.  Even if your soil is acidic, and I trust that it is, I would mulch it with some spaghnum peat moss, perlite and shredded bark of some kind probably in parts like this: 1 - 1 - 2, the shredded bark being 2, and do this strictly by volume.  Keep the mulch below the crown of the azalea at least a good full inch.  I would take some cottonseed meal and put a cup or so around it and water that in gently at this time, since you are likely to get a freeze in October, maybe even before you leave for Arizona.  I would not wait to do that.  Be careful around the base of the azalea, since the roots of Ericacae tend to stay close to the surface of the soil. . . .which means that you must be very careful about disrupting the soil too close to the plant itself.  Just at the dripline and beyond should be fine.  Be very careful inside the dripline!!!  Work that into the soil as best you can at this point and water it like there's no tomorrow.  Azaleas will take all the water they can get SO LONG AS the water drains away from the root zone about as fast as it comes in.  Working the mixture into the soil all around the azalea will assure that the mulch will not be blown away by winter winds.  If it is just left to sit on top of the soil, winds can blow it away and that won't do the plant any good at all. 

            Here's the real problem.  Winter winds can desiccate an azalea [or any plant] in a hurry, especially if the root zone is on the dry side and sometimes even if it isn't dry.  This means that you will have to make very sure that the azalea does NOT dry out significantly at any time during the winter.  You might want to bribe a neighbor to come over periodically and water it thoroughly.  If you have lots of snowfall and the azalea is covered [and the roots are therefore reasonably wet, too], the snow will protect the plant.  If there is little or no snow and a cold wind comes up, hit the root zone immediately [if not, sooner] with plenty of water to prevent desiccation.  Your neighbor will know this and encourage him/her to water the azalea forthwith.  If this is not done, then, it is nearly axiomatic that the azalea will not survive the winter with you gone. 

            Assuming you are able to arrange for watering during the time you are gone and the azalea thrives because of it, then, when you return and the chance of a freeze is reasonably passed, then, I would feed it only three times using cottonseed meal.  My own schedule is Easter, Fourth of July and Labor Day.  For you in your climate, I would suggest that Easter could be a bit early some years, so wait a tad until hard freezes are a thing of the past.  Guessing, I might say very late April or early May.  Then, Fourth of July and mid-August, NOT Labor Day, since that may be too close to your coming freezing weather.  Cottonseed meal is organic, slow acting and will not burn the plant, if applied properly as suggested above here.  It will also promote the microbial action in the soil which the azalea will need to turn nutrients into water soluble forms the feeder roots can use.  New growth must have some time to harden off a bit, since it is on the new growth where you will find next year's flowers.  So don't prune the new growth off for anyone.  And I also assume, as I indicated at the beginning of this tome, that your azalea is likely to be of a kind which will take your winters.  Does it have a label on it which tells what kind it is? 

            Those are my suggestions to save the azalea so that it can safely survive your winters there.

            George E. Klump
            Southern California Chapter, ARS/ASA



            --

            WebRep
            Overall rating
             





            --

            WebRep
            Overall rating
             



          • Nicholas Yarmoshuk
            I am pleased that Tadeusz wrote this item. The Stewartstonian in my garden was propagated in Pennsylvania from plants growing in Penna. I wonder what happens
            Message 5 of 5 , Aug 17, 2011
            • 0 Attachment
              I am pleased that Tadeusz wrote this item.
              The Stewartstonian in my garden was propagated in Pennsylvania from plants growing in Penna.
              I wonder what happens to plants that are propagated from eastern cuttings in western environments and then planted in the tundra (  ouch . . . . . ) of Minnesota.?
              Nick Yarmoshuk
              in St. Catharines where the summer of 2011 has been brutally hot and dry.  



              On Wed, Aug 17, 2011 at 10:55 AM, Tadeusz Dauksza <iltkyao@...> wrote:
              Bea In the Golden Gopher State;
               
                If this is your first time in trying to grow azaleas in Zimmerman, I hate to be a bearer of bad news, I personally think that your Stewartstonian will be done by next year---  but please do not despair --  first let me list some items that I think will cause the demise of your evergreen azalea;
               
               1. most likely your evergreen was grown in Cornelious or Banks, Oregon , totally different
                   climate than the "Frozen Thundra" where u live--       if this Stewartsonian  was grown say in Holland ,Michigan than U would have a chance.
               
                2. grown in pots there (Cornelious ,OR)  it was watered and "continuasly" fed  with fertilizer
               
                3. when you planted that azalea into ur  "native" soil, those encircled roots from the pot when u bought from the Box store (hOME Depot) have no chance to seek nutrients and water from your soil.
               
                4. Winter brings other problems for ur azalea-- BRR Rabbits, Voles, Bambi you might even have Lemmings there as well, lack of snow cover (maybe) will dessicate the leaves, although if there is lots of snow (good news- protection) will help,  
               
               5. Try Nick's suggestion with that Burlap-- it will be better than the cones.
               
              ------------------------------------------------------------------
               
                Now for some feel good info ---- when u get a chance do bring-up msg # 11854 from the azalea group and do read that msg, and most of all drive  25 miles and visit Erva Hance and see in the spring her beautiful display of close to 1,000 azaleas that she grows in Buffalo.
               
              Take care and good Luck
               
              Tadeusz-Lake Michigan Chapter ASA- join us---  www.azaleas.org
               
               

              From: Nicholas Yarmoshuk <rhodosrus@...>
              To: Cliff & Bea Bigley <4biglee@...>; azaleas@yahoogroups.com
              Cc: mixturev@...
              Sent: Wednesday, August 17, 2011 2:44 AM
              Subject: Re: [AZ] New Red Azalea

               
              Stewartstonian is hardy in my area and has experienced temps of -20C  (-4F) in my yard.
              Minnesota winters can be very much more severe.  
              Using styrofoam as a winter protection is very interesting.   Normally, plastic around a plant, without ventilation, will surely cook the plant under intense winter sun . . .  and then freeze the warmed tissues at night.    I would never put styrofoam around any plant especially an azalea.  The heat buildup inside from the winter sun can be pretty intense.  Instead, one normally uses burlap to cover the plant to avoid both wind dessication and winter leaf burn.  I must say that I never have covered my some 50+ evergreen azaleas. Temperatures here over the past 35 years have been known to get down to -10F (-23C).

              Mike Creel's comment about fertilizing late in the summer is very accurate.  I believe George also mentioned that.

              I would recommend you water your azalea very well in the fall - assuming you have excellent drainage - and be sure to cover the plant well with burlap shortly after the very first killing frost.

              Nick Yarmoshuk
              St. Catharines ON Canada,
              near Niagara Falls Canada.




              On Tue, Aug 16, 2011 at 6:13 PM, Cliff & Bea Bigley <4biglee@...> wrote:
              Hi, Thanks to both of you for responding. It was in full bloom on Mother's Day.  It is a "spring boomer"  evergreen, stewartstonian.  Hardy to 10 below.  I believe it was   purchased at Home Depot because there is a Home Depot web address on the instructions that came on the plant.  Would the "1 year guarantee" Be good over winter??? That's a joke?
              Roses here survive over winter when a styrafoam box is put on top of them for the winter.  Not possible of an azalea?
              I am getting worried now.
              Thanks for your quick responses,
              Beatrice Bigley

              On Aug 16, 2011, at 2:35 PM, Nicholas Yarmoshuk wrote:

              George's advice is always on the the mark . . . . .. . .  But . . . . if that azalea came to you on Mother's Day in full bloom it may well have been a "florist's azalea that is not likely to be frost hardy.     Before I decide to leave it in the ground in Minnesota I would ask a knowledgeable person (in the place where it was purchased) what variety it is.   When we know the variety we can then make a more informed recommendation.   If it came from a floral shop then it is most likely not hardy in Minnesota.

              Nick Yarmoshuk, near Niagara Falls Canada,
              in St. Catharines ON Canada, where florist azaleas
               die if kept outdoors in the winter . . . and it is somewhat
               milder here than it is in Minnesota.





              On Tue, Aug 16, 2011 at 4:58 PM, George Klump <mixturev@...> wrote:
               
              This is from the ASK US page, so please send me a cc.

              For Mothers Day I received a beautiful large evergreen red azalea. I
              transplanted it outside in a sunny place. It is growing and looks
              great. I have fertilized with Miracle Grow. My question is, I am in
              central Minnesota zip 55398 where the winter temps can get to 20 below
              and possibly heavy snow, what do I do. We winter in Arizona so it
              can't be brought into the house [it would be too large anyway]. Do I
              cut it back to the ground, leave it the way it is, cover the whole
              plant or just the roots with mulch. We leave MN in October so want to
              do whatever I can so it will survive. I love the plant.

              Thanks for your help!
              Beatrice Bigley
              4biglee@...

              Dear Beatrice,

              Thanks for writing to the azalea group.  I do not have your climate here, but I have lived where it can get plenty cold in the winter, e.g. upstate New York with lots of snow.  I used to use Miraclegro and Miracid myself, but long ago saw the error of my ways and repented.

              Azaleas can withstand some rather cold temperatures, assuming they are the variety fit for the climate in which they are sold.  Allowing that your red azalea is most likely in that category, i.e. fit for your climate, it is probably best left alone where you have planted it. 

              I would suggest this, however.  Even if your soil is acidic, and I trust that it is, I would mulch it with some spaghnum peat moss, perlite and shredded bark of some kind probably in parts like this: 1 - 1 - 2, the shredded bark being 2, and do this strictly by volume.  Keep the mulch below the crown of the azalea at least a good full inch.  I would take some cottonseed meal and put a cup or so around it and water that in gently at this time, since you are likely to get a freeze in October, maybe even before you leave for Arizona.  I would not wait to do that.  Be careful around the base of the azalea, since the roots of Ericacae tend to stay close to the surface of the soil. . . .which means that you must be very careful about disrupting the soil too close to the plant itself.  Just at the dripline and beyond should be fine.  Be very careful inside the dripline!!!  Work that into the soil as best you can at this point and water it like there's no tomorrow.  Azaleas will take all the water they can get SO LONG AS the water drains away from the root zone about as fast as it comes in.  Working the mixture into the soil all around the azalea will assure that the mulch will not be blown away by winter winds.  If it is just left to sit on top of the soil, winds can blow it away and that won't do the plant any good at all. 

              Here's the real problem.  Winter winds can desiccate an azalea [or any plant] in a hurry, especially if the root zone is on the dry side and sometimes even if it isn't dry.  This means that you will have to make very sure that the azalea does NOT dry out significantly at any time during the winter.  You might want to bribe a neighbor to come over periodically and water it thoroughly.  If you have lots of snowfall and the azalea is covered [and the roots are therefore reasonably wet, too], the snow will protect the plant.  If there is little or no snow and a cold wind comes up, hit the root zone immediately [if not, sooner] with plenty of water to prevent desiccation.  Your neighbor will know this and encourage him/her to water the azalea forthwith.  If this is not done, then, it is nearly axiomatic that the azalea will not survive the winter with you gone. 

              Assuming you are able to arrange for watering during the time you are gone and the azalea thrives because of it, then, when you return and the chance of a freeze is reasonably passed, then, I would feed it only three times using cottonseed meal.  My own schedule is Easter, Fourth of July and Labor Day.  For you in your climate, I would suggest that Easter could be a bit early some years, so wait a tad until hard freezes are a thing of the past.  Guessing, I might say very late April or early May.  Then, Fourth of July and mid-August, NOT Labor Day, since that may be too close to your coming freezing weather.  Cottonseed meal is organic, slow acting and will not burn the plant, if applied properly as suggested above here.  It will also promote the microbial action in the soil which the azalea will need to turn nutrients into water soluble forms the feeder roots can use.  New growth must have some time to harden off a bit, since it is on the new growth where you will find next year's flowers.  So don't prune the new growth off for anyone.  And I also assume, as I indicated at the beginning of this tome, that your azalea is likely to be of a kind which will take your winters.  Does it have a label on it which tells what kind it is? 

              Those are my suggestions to save the azalea so that it can safely survive your winters there.

              George E. Klump
              Southern California Chapter, ARS/ASA



              --

              WebRep
              Overall rating
               





              --

              WebRep
              Overall rating
               






              --

              WebRep
              Overall rating
               

            Your message has been successfully submitted and would be delivered to recipients shortly.