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  • Cliff & Bea Bigley
    This is from the ASK US page, so please send me a cc. For Mothers Day I received a beautiful large evergreen red azalea. I transplanted it outside in a sunny
    Message 1 of 13 , Aug 16 7:57 AM
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      This is from the ASK US page, so please send me a cc.

      For Mothers Day I received a beautiful large evergreen red azalea. I
      transplanted it outside in a sunny place. It is growing and looks
      great. I have fertilized with Miracle Grow. My question is, I am in
      central Minnesota zip 55398 where the winter temps can get to 20 below
      and possibly heavy snow, what do I do. We winter in Arizona so it
      can't be brought into the house [it would be too large anyway]. Do I
      cut it back to the ground, leave it the way it is, cover the whole
      plant or just the roots with mulch. We leave MN in October so want to
      do whatever I can so it will survive. I love the plant.

      Thanks for your help!
      Beatrice Bigley
      4biglee@...
    • Mike Creel
      It is highly likely that your Mothers Day azalea was not designed for outdoor growing, just for indoors and greenhouse and not for a long life.  Outdoor
      Message 2 of 13 , Aug 16 7:49 PM
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        It is highly likely that your Mothers Day azalea was not designed for outdoor growing, just for indoors and greenhouse and not for a long life.  Outdoor planting and late fertilization in your growing zone have pretty much doomed this indoor plant,  I would advise your purchasing a truly hardy outdoor azalea from a local nursery,
         
        Mike Creel, SC USDA Zone 8a
        Lexington, South Carolina
        From: Cliff & Bea Bigley <4biglee@...>
        To: azaleas@yahoogroups.com
        Sent: Tuesday, August 16, 2011 10:57 AM
        Subject: [AZ] this is from the ASK US page

         
        This is from the ASK US page, so please send me a cc.

        For Mothers Day I received a beautiful large evergreen red azalea. I
        transplanted it outside in a sunny place. It is growing and looks
        great. I have fertilized with Miracle Grow. My question is, I am in
        central Minnesota zip 55398 where the winter temps can get to 20 below
        and possibly heavy snow, what do I do. We winter in Arizona so it
        can't be brought into the house [it would be too large anyway]. Do I
        cut it back to the ground, leave it the way it is, cover the whole
        plant or just the roots with mulch. We leave MN in October so want to
        do whatever I can so it will survive. I love the plant.

        Thanks for your help!
        Beatrice Bigley
        4biglee@...




      • Charles Garfinkel
        Recently bought a house in southern side of Houston, Texas. The previous owner had planted hedge rows of azaleas that are not doing very well at all. Picture
        Message 3 of 13 , Mar 19, 2013

        Recently bought a house in southern side of Houston, Texas.

         

        The previous owner had planted hedge rows of azaleas that are not doing very well at all.  Picture attached.

         

        Most leaves are a pale green/yellow and have brown spots.  Many branches have no leaves.  Some plants will have dark green leaves and that portion of the plant is doing well (blooming) but the rest of the plant is doing poorly.

         

        Recently dug in the soil and found a few grub worms.  Not sure if it is related or another problem altogether.

         

        There are also three Magnolia trees (about 35' tall).  These don't look like they are doing very well either.  Some branches have poor growth or are defoliated.  Some leaves have brownish spots.  I am not sure if they are also suffering from the same problem.

         

        Any help would be much appreciated.

         

        Charles

         

         

      • George Klump
        19 March 2013 Charles, Thanks for dropping us a line on this problem. Unfortunately, grub worms are not uncommon at all in eastern Texas. I know, since I
        Message 4 of 13 , Mar 19, 2013
        • 0 Attachment
          19 March 2013

          Charles,

          Thanks for dropping us a line on this problem.  Unfortunately, grub worms are not uncommon at all in eastern Texas.  I know, since I lived in Dallas for many years and had to deal with them all the time, especially with my lawn. 

          Grub worms can do all the damage you have described.  If any Diazanon is still available to you, get the dry pellet form and spread it on and water it in.  If it is not available any longer, then, get an equivalent and put it all over the soil there.  Grub worms will feast on all the roots they can find and, while the damage to the plants is quite visible, they are not! 

          After you've dealt with that problem, then, get some cottonseed meal and put around each of your azaleas perhaps a cupful for each one.  Water that in gently.  I do that three times each year at Easter, Fourth of July and Labor Day.  More often than that is not necessary.  Easter should be well past a freeze in Houston and Labor Day is not too late.  I use those dates because they are easy to remember. 

          For your magnolia trees, I would suggest using an auger and go down about 18 inches on the points of the compass out at the drip line.  You can bisect those angles and make four more holes at the drip line, too.  Then, I would take the cottonseed meal and fill those holes up to ground level or a tad above.  Leave them alone as the trees will feed off the bottom end of the hole.  After a time the cottonseed meal will be gone.  You can do that maybe twice annually, if you wish, till you get the trees back into a healthier condition.  Trees need a lot of iron to grow well.  You could also give them a shot of iron as well. 

          George E. Klump
          Southern California Chapter, ARS/ASA





          On 3/19/2013 8:02 AM, Charles Garfinkel wrote:
           

          Recently bought a house in southern side of Houston, Texas.

           

          The previous owner had planted hedge rows of azaleas that are not doing very well at all.  Picture attached.

           

          Most leaves are a pale green/yellow and have brown spots.  Many branches have no leaves.  Some plants will have dark green leaves and that portion of the plant is doing well (blooming) but the rest of the plant is doing poorly.

           

          Recently dug in the soil and found a few grub worms.  Not sure if it is related or another problem altogether.

           

          There are also three Magnolia trees (about 35' tall).  These don't look like they are doing very well either.  Some branches have poor growth or are defoliated.  Some leaves have brownish spots.  I am not sure if they are also suffering from the same problem.

           

          Any help would be much appreciated.

           

          Charles

           

           


        • Charles Garfinkel
          George, Thank you for the quick and helpful reply. Grub worms seem like a simple enough problem to address. I was concerned that it was a fungal problem I
          Message 5 of 13 , Mar 19, 2013
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            George,

             

            Thank you for the quick and helpful reply.

             

            Grub worms seem like a simple enough problem to address.  I was concerned that it was a fungal problem I found on the internet called "rot disease" or Phytophthora.

             

            Will start addressing the grub worms this weekend.  I didn't realize they could damage the magnolias like that too.

             

            Will spread the word to a few neighbors who have similar looking problems with their magnolias.

             

            Thanks again,

            Charles

             

             

             

            From: George Klump [mailto:mixturev@...]
            Sent: Tuesday, March 19, 2013 12:25 PM
            To: azaleas@yahoogroups.com
            Cc: Charles Garfinkel
            Subject: Re: [AZ] this is from the ASK US page [1 Attachment]

             

            19 March 2013

            Charles,

            Thanks for dropping us a line on this problem.  Unfortunately, grub worms are not uncommon at all in eastern Texas.  I know, since I lived in Dallas for many years and had to deal with them all the time, especially with my lawn. 

            Grub worms can do all the damage you have described.  If any Diazanon is still available to you, get the dry pellet form and spread it on and water it in.  If it is not available any longer, then, get an equivalent and put it all over the soil there.  Grub worms will feast on all the roots they can find and, while the damage to the plants is quite visible, they are not! 

            After you've dealt with that problem, then, get some cottonseed meal and put around each of your azaleas perhaps a cupful for each one.  Water that in gently.  I do that three times each year at Easter, Fourth of July and Labor Day.  More often than that is not necessary.  Easter should be well past a freeze in Houston and Labor Day is not too late.  I use those dates because they are easy to remember. 

            For your magnolia trees, I would suggest using an auger and go down about 18 inches on the points of the compass out at the drip line.  You can bisect those angles and make four more holes at the drip line, too.  Then, I would take the cottonseed meal and fill those holes up to ground level or a tad above.  Leave them alone as the trees will feed off the bottom end of the hole.  After a time the cottonseed meal will be gone.  You can do that maybe twice annually, if you wish, till you get the trees back into a healthier condition.  Trees need a lot of iron to grow well.  You could also give them a shot of iron as well. 

            George E. Klump
            Southern California Chapter, ARS/ASA





            On 3/19/2013 8:02 AM, Charles Garfinkel wrote:

             

            [Attachment(s) from Charles Garfinkel included below]

            Recently bought a house in southern side of Houston, Texas.

             

            The previous owner had planted hedge rows of azaleas that are not doing very well at all.  Picture attached.

             

            Most leaves are a pale green/yellow and have brown spots.  Many branches have no leaves.  Some plants will have dark green leaves and that portion of the plant is doing well (blooming) but the rest of the plant is doing poorly.

             

            Recently dug in the soil and found a few grub worms.  Not sure if it is related or another problem altogether.

             

            There are also three Magnolia trees (about 35' tall).  These don't look like they are doing very well either.  Some branches have poor growth or are defoliated.  Some leaves have brownish spots.  I am not sure if they are also suffering from the same problem.

             

            Any help would be much appreciated.

             

            Charles

             

             

             

          • George Klump
            I m glad to be of help, Charles. Since you mention root rot, otherwise known as phytophthora, this is arguably the most dangerous single plant disease in the
            Message 6 of 13 , Mar 19, 2013
            • 0 Attachment
              I'm glad to be of help, Charles. 

              Since you mention root rot, otherwise known as phytophthora, this is arguably the most dangerous single plant disease in the entire world.  Not only was it probably responsible for the great Irish potato famine back in the 1840's which resulted in a huge emigration to the USA at the time, it has currently cost the British conservancy several millions of dollars in plants and they are having a terrible time eradicating it.  Its cause is usually quite simple: too much water in the root zone.  Its cure is usually quite simple: rapid drainage.  If you do not have rapid drainage in your soil, get some gypsum [calcium sulphate] and spread it liberally, maybe a quarter-inch deep, over all of your soil, grass and all.  Water that in gently and give it at least a week.  That I would do twice annually, e.g. spring and fall.  That will break up your soil in a hurry and permit the water to drain down and away from your plant roots.  Houston is notorious for low lying land in some areas and the water table can be quite close to the surface. 

              Azaleas, which are a sub-section of the rhododendron family, will take all the water you can give them SO LONG AS the water drains away from the root zone about as fast as it comes in.  The roots will not tolerate sitting in water but they will tolerate moisture in the soil.  We use a mixture of coarse peat moss, perlite and shredded redwood bark in equal parts, i.e. 1 - 1 - 1, and plant the azaleas in that.  If shredded redwood bark is not available to you, though it would be the best, if you can get it, then, use orchid bark which is usually shredded Douglas Fir, but make the mixture 1 - 1 - 2.

              George E. Klump
              Southern California Chapter, ARS/ASA







              On 3/19/2013 10:47 AM, Charles Garfinkel wrote:
               

              George,

               

              Thank you for the quick and helpful reply.

               

              Grub worms seem like a simple enough problem to address.  I was concerned that it was a fungal problem I found on the internet called "rot disease" or Phytophthora.

               

              Will start addressing the grub worms this weekend.  I didn't realize they could damage the magnolias like that too.

               

              Will spread the word to a few neighbors who have similar looking problems with their magnolias.

               

              Thanks again,

              Charles

               

               

               

              From: George Klump [mailto:mixturev! @pacbell..net]
              Sent: Tuesday, March 19, 2013 12:25 PM
              To: azaleas@yahoogroups.com
              Cc: Charles Garfinkel
              Subject: Re: [AZ] this is from the ASK US page [1 Attachment]

               

              19 March 2013

              Charles,

              Thanks for dropping us a line on this problem.  Unfortunately, grub worms are not uncommon at all in eastern Texas.  I know, since I lived in Dallas for many years and had to deal with them all the time, especially with my lawn. 

              Grub worms can do all the damage you have described.  If any Diazanon is still available to you, get the dry pellet form and spread it on and water it in.  If it is not available any longer, then, get an equivalent and put it all over the soil there.  Grub worms will feast on all the roots they can find and, while the damage to the plants is quite visible, they are not! 

              After you've dealt with that problem, then, get some cottonseed meal and put around each of your azaleas perhaps a cupful for each one.  Water that in gently.  I do that three times each year at Easter, Fourth of July and Labor Day.  More often than that is not necessary.  Easter should be well past a freeze in Houston and Labor Day is not too late.  I use those dates because they are easy to remember. 

              For your magnolia trees, I would suggest using an auger and go down about 18 inches on the points of the compass out at the drip line.  You can bisect those angles and make four more holes at the drip line, too.  Then, I would take the cottonseed meal and fill those holes up to ground level or a tad above.  Leave them alone as the trees will feed off the bottom end of the hole.  After a time the cottonseed meal will be gone.  You can do that maybe twice annually, if you wish, till you get the tree! s back into a healthier condition.  Trees need a lot of iron to grow well.  You could also give them a shot of iron as well. 

              George E. Klump
              Southern California Chapter, ARS/ASA





              On 3/19/2013 8:02 AM, Charles Garfinkel wrote:

               

              [Attachment(s) from Charles Garfinkel included below]

              Recently bought a house in southern side of Houston, Texas.

               

              The previous owner had planted hedge rows of azaleas that are not doing very well at all.  Picture attached.

               

              Most leaves are a pale green/yellow and have brown spots.  Many branches have no leaves.  Some plants will have dark green leaves and that portion of the plant is doing well (blooming) but the rest of the plant is doing poorly.

               

              Recently dug in the soil and found a few grub worms.  Not sure if it is related or another problem altogether.

               

              There are also three Magnolia trees (about 35' tall).  These don't look like they are doing very well either.  Some branches have poor growth or are defoliated.  Some leaves have brownish spots.  I am not sure if they are also suffering from the same problem.

               

              Any help would be much appreciated.

               

              Charles

               

               

               


            • <charlesgarfinkel@...>
              Again, thanks for the info. Will take a closer look at how it drains in the area. Charles Garfinkel From: George Klump Sent: ‎March‎ ‎20‎, ‎2013
              Message 7 of 13 , Mar 19, 2013
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                Again, thanks for the info. Will take a closer look at how it drains in the area.
                 
                Charles Garfinkel
                 
                From: George Klump
                Sent: ‎March‎ ‎20‎, ‎2013 ‎12‎:‎13‎ ‎AM
                To: azaleas@yahoogroups.com
                CC: Charles Garfinkel; pgg29@...; 'Berg, Adam'; Julie Berg
                Subject: Re: [AZ] this is from the ASK US page
                 
                I'm glad to be of help, Charles. 

                Since you mention root rot, otherwise known as phytophthora, this is arguably the most dangerous single plant disease in the entire world.  Not only was it probably responsible for the great Irish potato famine back in the 1840's which resulted in a huge emigration to the USA at the time, it has currently cost the British conservancy several millions of dollars in plants and they are having a terrible time eradicating it.  Its cause is usually quite simple: too much water in the root zone.  Its cure is usually quite simple: rapid drainage.  If you do not have rapid drainage in your soil, get some gypsum [calcium sulphate] and spread it liberally, maybe a quarter-inch deep, over all of your soil, grass and all.  Water that in gently and give it at least a week.  That I would do twice annually, e.g. spring and fall.  That will break up your soil in a hurry and permit the water to drain down and away from your plant roots.  Houston is notorious for low lying land in some areas and the water table can be quite close to the surface. 

                Azaleas, which are a sub-section of the rhododendron family, will take all the water you can give them SO LONG AS the water drains away from the root zone about as fast as it comes in.  The roots will not tolerate sitting in water but they will tolerate moisture in the soil.  We use a mixture of coarse peat moss, perlite and shredded redwood bark in equal parts, i.e. 1 - 1 - 1, and plant the azaleas in that.  If shredded redwood bark is not available to you, though it would be the best, if you can get it, then, use orchid bark which is usually shredded Douglas Fir, but make the mixture 1 - 1 - 2.

                George E. Klump
                Southern California Chapter, ARS/ASA







                On 3/19/2013 10:47 AM, Charles Garfinkel wrote:
                 

                George,

                 

                Thank you for the quick and helpful reply.

                 

                Grub worms seem like a simple enough problem to address.  I was concerned that it was a fungal problem I found on the internet called "rot disease" or Phytophthora.

                 

                Will start addressing the grub worms this weekend.  I didn't realize they could damage the magnolias like that too.

                 

                Will spread the word to a few neighbors who have similar looking problems with their magnolias.

                 

                Thanks again,

                Charles

                 

                 

                 

                From: George Klump [mailto:mixturev! @pacbell..net]
                Sent: Tuesday, March 19, 2013 12:25 PM
                To: azaleas@yahoogroups.com
                Cc: Charles Garfinkel
                Subject: Re: [AZ] this is from the ASK US page [1 Attachment]

                 

                19 March 2013

                Charles,

                Thanks for dropping us a line on this problem.  Unfortunately, grub worms are not uncommon at all in eastern Texas.  I know, since I lived in Dallas for many years and had to deal with them all the time, especially with my lawn. 

                Grub worms can do all the damage you have described.  If any Diazanon is still available to you, get the dry pellet form and spread it on and water it in.  If it is not available any longer, then, get an equivalent and put it all over the soil there.  Grub worms will feast on all the roots they can find and, while the damage to the plants is quite visible, they are not! 

                After you've dealt with that problem, then, get some cottonseed meal and put around each of your azaleas perhaps a cupful for each one.  Water that in gently.  I do that three times each year at Easter, Fourth of July and Labor Day.  More often than that is not necessary.  Easter should be well past a freeze in Houston and Labor Day is not too late.  I use those dates because they are easy to remember. 

                For your magnolia trees, I would suggest using an auger and go down about 18 inches on the points of the compass out at the drip line.  You can bisect those angles and make four more holes at the drip line, too.  Then, I would take the cottonseed meal and fill those holes up to ground level or a tad above.  Leave them alone as the trees will feed off the bottom end of the hole.  After a time the cottonseed meal will be gone.  You can do that maybe twice annually, if you wish, till you get the tree! s back into a healthier condition.  Trees need a lot of iron to grow well.  You could also give them a shot of iron as well. 

                George E. Klump
                Southern California Chapter, ARS/ASA





                On 3/19/2013 8:02 AM, Charles Garfinkel wrote:

                 

                [Attachment(s) from Charles Garfinkel included below]

                Recently bought a house in southern side of Houston, Texas.

                 

                The previous owner had planted hedge rows of azaleas that are not doing very well at all.  Picture attached.

                 

                Most leaves are a pale green/yellow and have brown spots.  Many branches have no leaves.  Some plants will have dark green leaves and that portion of the plant is doing well (blooming) but the rest of the plant is doing poorly.

                 

                Recently dug in the soil and found a few grub worms.  Not sure if it is related or another problem altogether.

                 

                There are also three Magnolia trees (about 35' tall).  These don't look like they are doing very well either.  Some branches have poor growth or are defoliated.  Some leaves have brownish spots.  I am not sure if they are also suffering from the same problem.

                 

                Any help would be much appreciated.

                 

                Charles

                 

                 

                 


              • Carl Buhlman
                re: Mildred azaleas, perhaps aka Mildred Mae Hello, I am a huge fan of this cultivar, however I m unable to locate a nursery which has them. Is there a
                Message 8 of 13 , Apr 16, 2013
                re: "Mildred" azaleas, perhaps aka "Mildred Mae"

                Hello,

                I am a huge fan of this cultivar, however I'm unable to locate a nursery which has them. Is there a reason for this? Any guidance on  anyone who can sell me these azaleas, is greatly appreciated. I live in Maryland.

                enclosed is a photo, in case it is not clear what I'm looking for. Thank you, Carl


              • Tadeusz Dauksza
                http://www.fantasticplants.com/Merchant2/merchant.mv?Screen=PROD&Store_Code=FP&Product_Code=6573       tadeusz. ________________________________ From: Carl
                Message 9 of 13 , Apr 16, 2013
                • 0 Attachment
                   
                   
                   
                  tadeusz.

                  From: Carl Buhlman <buhlmanc@...>
                  To: "azaleas@yahoogroups.com" <azaleas@yahoogroups.com>
                  Cc: carl buhlman <buhlmanc@...>
                  Sent: Tuesday, April 16, 2013 9:02 AM
                  Subject: [AZ] this is from the ASK US page [1 Attachment]
                   
                  re: "Mildred" azaleas, perhaps aka "Mildred Mae"

                  Hello,

                  I am a huge fan of this cultivar, however I'm unable to locate a nursery which has them. Is there a reason for this? Any guidance on  anyone who can sell me these azaleas, is greatly appreciated. I live in Maryland.

                  enclosed is a photo, in case it is not clear what I'm looking for. Thank you, Carl


                • John Migas
                  Hi Carl,   http://www.rhododendron.org/descriptionAH_new.asp?ID=104   http://www.rhododendron.org/descriptionAH_new.asp?ID=122   The photo you submitted is
                  Message 10 of 13 , Apr 23, 2013
                  • 0 Attachment
                    Hi Carl,
                     
                     
                     
                    The photo you submitted is not 'Mildred Mae' which is much more lavender and not 
                    a hose/hose flower. The photo looks a lot more like 'Purple Splendor' to me. I grow
                    both of these plants here in Michigan and they are both Gable hybrids, extremely hardy,
                    and both are excellent plants for your area.
                     
                    John Migas(Michigan)
                     
                     
                     
                     
                     

                    From: Carl Buhlman <buhlmanc@...>
                    To: "azaleas@yahoogroups.com" <azaleas@yahoogroups.com>
                    Cc: carl buhlman <buhlmanc@...>
                    Sent: Tuesday, April 16, 2013 10:02 AM
                    Subject: [AZ] this is from the ASK US page [1 Attachment]
                     
                    re: "Mildred" azaleas, perhaps aka "Mildred Mae"

                    Hello,

                    I am a huge fan of this cultivar, however I'm unable to locate a nursery which has them. Is there a reason for this? Any guidance on  anyone who can sell me these azaleas, is greatly appreciated. I live in Maryland.

                    enclosed is a photo, in case it is not clear what I'm looking for. Thank you, Carl


                  • Watson, Dave
                    So I mistakenly sprayed my azaleas with Vigoro Weed and feed...didn t think it would hurt them at all but the leaves are all wilting and I am afraid I am going
                    Message 11 of 13 , Jun 5, 2014
                    • 0 Attachment

                      So I mistakenly sprayed my azaleas with Vigoro Weed and feed…didn’t think it would hurt them at all but the leaves are all wilting and I am afraid I am going to lose them ..15 years old…any ideas of what I can do to revive them..thanks..

                       

                      Dave Watson

                      Senior Managing Director

                      Description: http://www.newmarkkf.com/redline.gif

                       

                      Please Note New Email Address

                       

                      Newmark Grubb Knight Frank
                      3424 Peachtree Road, Suite 800
                      Atlanta, GA 30326

                      T 770.552.2403  

                      M 404.915.1956

                      dwatson@...

                      Description: Newmark Knight Frank

                       

                       


                      NOTICE: This e-mail message and any attachments are intended solely for the use of the intended recipient, and may contain information that is confidential, privileged and exempt from disclosure under applicable law. If you are not the intended recipient, you are not permitted to read, disclose, reproduce, distribute, use or take any action in reliance upon this message and any attachments, and we request that you promptly notify the sender and immediately delete this message and any attachments as well as any copies thereof. Delivery of this message to an unintended recipient is not intended to waive any right or privilege. Newmark Grubb Knight Frank is neither qualified nor authorized to give legal or tax advice, and any such advice should be obtained from an appropriate, qualified professional advisor of your own choosing.  

                    • Thomas Schuetz
                      Dave, it would pay to read the instructions and list of ingredients on any garden chemical. According to the label, Vigoro Weed and Feed contains: Active
                      Message 12 of 13 , Jun 5, 2014
                      • 0 Attachment
                        Dave, it would pay to read the instructions and list of ingredients on any garden chemical.
                        According to the label, Vigoro Weed and Feed contains: Active Ingredients: 2,4-D, Dimethylamine Salt (3.25%)
                        In short, if you sprayed the leaves with this chemical and they are wilting, your azalea is a goner.
                         
                        Replace it.
                         
                        Tom Schuetz
                        USDA Zone 7A (as of 2012)
                         


                        From: azaleas@yahoogroups.com [mailto:azaleas@yahoogroups.com]
                        Sent: Thursday, June 05, 2014 3:21 PM
                        To: azaleas@yahoogroups.com
                        Subject: [AZ] this is from the ASK US page

                         

                        So I mistakenly sprayed my azaleas with Vigoro Weed and feed…didn’t think it would hurt them at all but the leaves are all wilting and I am afraid I am going to lose them ..15 years old…any ideas of what I can do to revive them..thanks..

                        Dave Watson

                        Senior Managing Director

                        Description: http://www.newmarkkf.com/redline.gif

                        Please Note New Email Address

                        Newmark Grubb Knight Frank
                        3424 Peachtree Road, Suite 800
                        Atlanta, GA 30326

                        T 770.552.2403  

                        M 404.915.1956

                        dwatson@...

                        Description: Newmark Knight Frank


                        NOTICE: This e-mail message and any attachments are intended solely for the use of the intended recipient, and may contain information that is confidential, privileged and exempt from disclosure under applicable law. If you are not the intended recipient, you are not permitted to read, disclose, reproduce, distribute, use or take any action in reliance upon this message and any attachments, and we request that you promptly notify the sender and immediately delete this message and any attachments as well as any copies thereof. Delivery of this message to an unintended recipient is not intended to waive any right or privilege. Newmark Grubb Knight Frank is neither qualified nor authorized to give legal or tax advice, and any such advice should be obtained from an appropriate, qualified professional advisor of your own choosing.  

                      • John Migas
                        Dave,   The systemic chemicals may be too far into the plants system by now. If you prune back the plant hard enough you may save it. New growth should
                        Message 13 of 13 , Jun 5, 2014
                        Dave,
                         
                        The systemic chemicals may be too far into the plants system by now. If you prune back the plant hard enough you may save it. New growth should respond within weeks, it may be worth the try.
                         
                        I spray my lawn with weed/feed and at times I do overspray near the plants, but I have never have a plant die.
                         
                        It's worth trying to prune back, If you drenched the azaleas, then they most likely be goners.
                         
                        Then again, your are located in Georgia, how often are you watering the plants? Water, water, water, may help.
                        Is the plant wilting from lack of watering?
                         
                        Good luck................John Migas(Michigan)
                         
                        From: "'Thomas Schuetz' schuetz101@... [azaleas]" <azaleas@yahoogroups.com>
                        To: azaleas@yahoogroups.com
                        Cc: dwatson@...
                        Sent: Thursday, June 5, 2014 4:44 PM
                        Subject: RE: [AZ] this is from the ASK US page

                         
                        Dave, it would pay to read the instructions and list of ingredients on any garden chemical.
                        According to the label, Vigoro Weed and Feed contains: Active Ingredients: 2,4-D, Dimethylamine Salt (3.25%)
                        In short, if you sprayed the leaves with this chemical and they are wilting, your azalea is a goner.
                         
                        Replace it.
                         
                        Tom Schuetz
                        USDA Zone 7A (as of 2012)
                         

                        From: azaleas@yahoogroups.com [mailto:azaleas@yahoogroups.com]
                        Sent: Thursday, June 05, 2014 3:21 PM
                        To: azaleas@yahoogroups.com
                        Subject: [AZ] this is from the ASK US page

                         
                        So I mistakenly sprayed my azaleas with Vigoro Weed and feed…didn’t think it would hurt them at all but the leaves are all wilting and I am afraid I am going to lose them ..15 years old…any ideas of what I can do to revive them..thanks..
                        Dave Watson
                        Senior Managing Director
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