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Re: [AZ] Re: Pine Bark Mulch

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  • Ron Rabideau
    William, Interesting, I never had access to beech leaves and didn t know about their usefulness. Ron On Sun, 10 Jul 2011 16:24:38 -0400, William Shearer
    Message 1 of 22 , Jul 10, 2011
      William,
      Interesting, I never had access to beech leaves and didn't know about
      their usefulness.

      Ron

      On Sun, 10 Jul 2011 16:24:38 -0400, William Shearer <noybznz@...>
      wrote:

      > Ron,
      > Interesting that you should mention oak leaves, I too was going to
      > mention oak
      > leaves, along with beech leaves as soil amendments/mulch. I have a
      > regular
      > supply of beech leaves which I use in my soil mix, having the same
      > affect as oak
      > leaves. An additional affect of oak and beech leaves is the slow rate of
      > decomposing. This benefits azaleas and rhododendrons in soil structure
      > and, as
      > you mentioned, organic matter and soil ecology (microbial interactions).
      >
      > /William
      >
      >
      >
      >
      >
      > ________________________________
      > From: Ron Rabideau <rhodyrex@...>
      > To: azaleas@yahoogroups.com
      > Sent: Sun, July 10, 2011 5:06:27 PM
      > Subject: Re: [AZ] Re: Pine Bark Mulch
      >
      > My take on organic mulches is that they provide far more benefit than
      > potentially altering the pH. The addition of organic matter to a soil can
      > ameliorate the effect of pH such that one could grow a wider range of
      > plants in the amended soil that one without the organic material. This is
      > because of the complex ion exchange interactions whereby the organic
      > materials can bind nutrients and make them available over a wider range
      > of
      > pH. Additionally the organic material provides a substrate for mycorhizae
      > and other beneficial organisms that assist in making nutrients available
      > to plant roots. Lastly, organic material mixed into the soil greatly
      > improves it's ability to hold moisture and when applied on the surface as
      > a mulch it forms a barrier to slow down loss of water by evaporation from
      > the soil surface. Mulches abviously suppress weeds as well.
      >
      > My absolute favorite mulch for rhodos and azaleas is shredded oak leaves.
      > I have been using shredded red oak leaves for years and they are
      > fantastic. If you have ever noticed leaves- especially oak leaves
      > sittling
      > in water, they color the water brown. These are humic substances and are
      > some of the organic materials in the leaves that greatly benefit the
      > plants.
      >
      >
      >


      --
      Ron Rabideau
      Camden, NJ
      Zone 6b-7a
    • Ron Rabideau
      Nick, I never had any problem with the material blowing away but then I haven t applied it in any really windy exposed locations. If you compost it for six
      Message 2 of 22 , Jul 10, 2011
        Nick,
        I never had any problem with the material blowing away but then I haven't
        applied it in any really windy exposed locations. If you compost it for
        six months to a year you shouldn't have any problems.
        Buckwheat hull mulch is one you really have to be carefull about the wind
        blowing it away.

        Ron

        On Sun, 10 Jul 2011 20:10:02 -0400, Nicholas Yarmoshuk
        <rhodosrus@...> wrote:

        > Ron
        >
        > too am a great fan of shredded oak leaves.
        > How do you mulch with the fine shredded oak leave and do not experience
        > this
        > material blowing away in the first breeze after distributing it. In
        > St.Catharines, I don't have that trouble, but here I compost the oak
        > leaves
        > for 6 months before I use them
        >
        > I have a new bed (with 70 plants in it) that is in a pretty open and airy
        > (read windy) location on the shores of Lake Erie. I am about to mulch
        > it
        > with shredded oak leaves. I am afraid the mulch will all blow away.
        > Any
        > suggestions.
        >
        > By the way . . . I also have access to a good quanity of pine and sprice
        > wood from branches. I have always composted that material with shredded
        > oak leaves and then used that material as a mulch. Seems to work in my
        > patch.
        >
        > Nick Yarmoshuk
        >
        > On Sun, Jul 10, 2011 at 11:06 AM, Ron Rabideau <rhodyrex@...>
        > wrote:
        >
        >> My take on organic mulches is that they provide far more benefit than
        >> potentially altering the pH. The addition of organic matter to a soil
        >> can
        >> ameliorate the effect of pH such that one could grow a wider range of
        >> plants in the amended soil that one without the organic material. This
        >> is
        >> because of the complex ion exchange interactions whereby the organic
        >> materials can bind nutrients and make them available over a wider range
        >> of
        >> pH. Additionally the organic material provides a substrate for
        >> mycorhizae
        >> and other beneficial organisms that assist in making nutrients available
        >> to plant roots. Lastly, organic material mixed into the soil greatly
        >> improves it's ability to hold moisture and when applied on the surface
        >> as
        >> a mulch it forms a barrier to slow down loss of water by evaporation
        >> from
        >> the soil surface. Mulches abviously suppress weeds as well.
        >>
        >> My absolute favorite mulch for rhodos and azaleas is shredded oak
        >> leaves.
        >> I have been using shredded red oak leaves for years and they are
        >> fantastic. If you have ever noticed leaves- especially oak leaves
        >> sittling
        >> in water, they color the water brown. These are humic substances and are
        >> some of the organic materials in the leaves that greatly benefit the
        >> plants.
        >>
        >>
        >>
        >> --
        >> Ron Rabideau
        >> Camden, NJ
        >> Zone 6b-7a
        >>
        >>
        >> ------------------------------------
        >>
        >> When you reply to an email, PLEASE quote its relevant part(s) only, as
        >> context, and DELETE the rest - especially this line and the Yahoo lines.
        >> And PLEASE tell us your city, state and/or USDA zone.
        >>
        >> We welcome attached images RESIZED to be under 100KB in size - 640 x 480
        >> pixel JPEG images at 50% or 1:40 compression are ideal. By attaching
        >> them
        >> you agree that, without giving up your rights to them, they may be
        >> shown on
        >> Azalea Society websites.
        >>
        >> To unsubscribe, send an email to: azaleas-unsubscribe@yahoogroups.com
        >>
        >> Yahoo! Groups Links
        >>
        >>
        >>
        >>
        >
        >


        --
        Ron Rabideau
        Camden, NJ
        Zone 6b-7a
      • George Klump
        Don t know how it works there where you are, but oak leaves sometimes produce a mold which causes more problems than it helps. If that mold gets into the
        Message 3 of 22 , Jul 10, 2011
          Don't know how it works there where you are, but oak leaves sometimes produce a mold which causes more problems than it helps.  If that mold gets into the soil, it's there for decades.  If the concern is creating a stable pH in the soil, why not just mix in some coarse peat moss?  It's stable for years, at least 15 to 20, and some of mine are going on 30 years.  A lower pH tends to suppress weeds anyway, at least here it does.  A pH below 7.0 promotes the release of the hydrogen ion which will free up nutrients and make them available in a water soluble form the feeder roots of azaleas et al can use.  As for retaining moisture in the soil, this will do the job quite well, but adding some calcium sulphate [gypsum] once or twice annually is even better. 

          George E. Klump
          Southern California Chapter, ARS/ASA






          On 7/10/2011 5:40 PM, Ron Rabideau wrote:
          William,
          Interesting, I never had access to beech leaves and didn't know about  
          their usefulness.
          
          Ron
          
          On Sun, 10 Jul 2011 16:24:38 -0400, William Shearer <noybznz@...>  
          wrote:
          
          
          Ron,
          Interesting that you should mention oak leaves, I too was going to  
          mention oak
          leaves, along with beech leaves as soil amendments/mulch. I have a  
          regular
          supply of beech leaves which I use in my soil mix, having the same  
          affect as oak
          leaves. An additional affect of oak and beech leaves is the slow rate of
          decomposing. This benefits azaleas and rhododendrons in soil structure  
          and, as
          you mentioned, organic matter and soil ecology (microbial interactions).
          
          /William
          
          
          
          
          
          ________________________________
          From: Ron Rabideau <rhodyrex@...>
          To: azaleas@yahoogroups.com
          Sent: Sun, July 10, 2011 5:06:27 PM
          Subject: Re: [AZ] Re: Pine Bark Mulch
          
          My take on organic mulches is that they provide far more benefit than
          potentially altering the pH. The addition of organic matter to a soil can
          ameliorate the effect of pH such that one could grow a wider range of
          plants in the amended soil that one without the organic material. This is
          because of the complex ion exchange interactions whereby the organic
          materials can bind nutrients and make them available over a wider range  
          of
          pH. Additionally the organic material provides a substrate for mycorhizae
          and other beneficial organisms that assist in making nutrients available
          to plant roots. Lastly,  organic material mixed into the soil greatly
          improves it's ability to hold moisture and when applied on the surface as
          a mulch it forms a barrier to slow down loss of water by evaporation from
          the soil surface.  Mulches abviously suppress weeds as well.
          
          My absolute favorite mulch for rhodos and azaleas is shredded oak leaves.
          I have been using shredded red oak leaves for years and they are
          fantastic. If you have ever noticed leaves- especially oak leaves  
          sittling
          in water, they color the water brown. These are humic substances and are
          some of the organic materials in the leaves that greatly benefit the
          plants.
          
          
          
          
          
          

        • Bob Stelloh
          The ASA website at http://www.azaleas.org/index.pl/azxDiaDrA.html shows that Doctor Curtis Alderfer is the correct name, and that it has synonyms Doctor
          Message 4 of 22 , Jul 11, 2011
            The ASA website at
            http://www.azaleas.org/index.pl/azxDiaDrA.html
            shows that 'Doctor Curtis Alderfer' is the correct name, and that it
            has synonyms 'Doctor Curtis Aldifer' and 'Doctor Alderfer'. The
            website shows name info from the 2004 edition of The International
            Rhododendron Register and Checklist, which is a very carefully
            researched authority. So I would say Galle is listing the same plant
            under two different names, in error. The p. 202 reference in Galle is
            correct.

            Bob Stelloh Hendersonville NC USDA Zone 7

            On Jul 10, 2011, at 7:46 PM, bsperling wrote:

            > Just back from the No. Va cutting exchange and I picked up a
            > small
            > plant called 'Dr. Curtis Aldifer'. This is on p. 300 of Galle as a
            > vivid red semi-double and is from "Australia and New Zealand".
            > However,
            > on p. 202 of Galle is a Linwood Hardy 'Dr. Curtis Alderfer', a red
            > semi-double.
            > Hmmmmm .... suspiciously alike but quite different origins. Are
            > they really 2 different plants? If not, the correct name and
            > origin is ...?
            > Barry
            >
            >
            > ------------------------------------
            >
            > When you reply to an email, PLEASE quote its relevant part(s) only,
            > as context, and DELETE the rest - especially this line and the
            > Yahoo lines. And PLEASE tell us your city, state and/or USDA zone.
            >
            > We welcome attached images RESIZED to be under 100KB in size - 640
            > x 480 pixel JPEG images at 50% or 1:40 compression are ideal. By
            > attaching them you agree that, without giving up your rights to
            > them, they may be shown on Azalea Society websites.
            >
            > To unsubscribe, send an email to: azaleas-unsubscribe@yahoogroups.com
            >
            > Yahoo! Groups Links
            >
            >
            >
          • jrm1213@juno.com
            Dr Curtis Alderfer is a Linwood variety, hardy to about 20 to 25 degrees F. It was numbered C-24 and is the result of a 1953 cross of K-28 x Koenig . I
            Message 5 of 22 , Jul 11, 2011
              Dr Curtis Alderfer is a Linwood variety, hardy to about 20 to 25 degrees F.  It was numbered C-24 and is the result of a 1953 cross of "K-28" x "Koenig".
               
              I believe it was named for one of Mr. Fischer's professors at Cornell.


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            • Ted Stecki
              Dr Aldefer was a photographer .....Al Reid met him at the ARS convention at the Nat Arb in Washinton,DC. Al liked him before he knew he drank. He named a
              Message 6 of 22 , Jul 12, 2011
                Dr Aldefer was a photographer .....Al Reid met him at the ARS convention at the Nat Arb in Washinton,DC. Al liked him before he knew he drank. He named a Linwood after him, C24, he told me he was sorry that he did because of his drinking.Al was a Methodist and didn't approve of drinking. I have all of the history of the Linwoods as I spent alot of time wth Al before he died in Feb 1986.
                Ted Stecki
                90 Kresson-Gibbsboro Rd
                Voorhees, NJ 08043
                Tel : 856 784 6203
                Cell : 609 314 5960
                ----- Original Message -----
                Sent: Tuesday, July 12, 2011 1:34 AM
                Subject: Re: [AZ] Alderfer - Aldifer

                 

                Dr Curtis Alderfer is a Linwood variety, hardy to about 20 to 25 degrees F.  It was numbered C-24 and is the result of a 1953 cross of "K-28" x "Koenig".
                 
                I believe it was named for one of Mr. Fischer's professors at Cornell.


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                1 ridiculously huge coupon a day. Get 50-90% off your city's best!
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