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Re: [AZ] [this is from the ASK US page, so please send me a CC] - hardwood mulch put on azaleas by mistake

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  • David Nanney
    Natalie, we use hardwood mulch all the time without a problem in Springfield, Va. As long as the mulch is not piled up on the base of the plant (a problem
    Message 1 of 6 , Jun 30, 2011
      Natalie, we use hardwood mulch all the time without a problem in Springfield, Va.  As long as the mulch is not piled up on the base of the plant (a problem with any mulch), it should be fine.
      Dave Nanney
      Springfield, Va
      But cool for two weeks in Seattle with our granddaughter

      Sent from my iPhone

      On Jun 30, 2011, at 11:54 AM, natalie gluck <nsgluck@...> wrote:

       

      Hello, azalea lovers,
       
      A lawn service put 3" deep of hardwood mulch under my large, mature azaleas in northern Virginia, near Washington DC (zone 6B). The azaleas are each about 6-8 feet wide, and 4-6 feet tall. There are 2 rows of azaleas, each about 60 feet long, so it would be very difficult for me to remove the mulch and re-do it all with pine mulch. (I didn't know they were using hardwood.)
       
      Will this one-time application hurt my plants? (I will make sure pine is used in the future.) What, if any, corrective gardening action should I take? Should I wait and see if my plants look yellow or sick, or will that be too late?   
       
      Thanks,
      Natalie

    • Nicholas Yarmoshuk
      Our experience with a recent demonstration garden planting has been that inexperienced, over-zealous mulchers have actually piled on mulch that resulted in
      Message 2 of 6 , Jul 1, 2011
        Our experience with a recent demonstration garden planting has been that inexperienced, over-zealous mulchers have actually piled on mulch that resulted in  phythopthera root rot.  The plants really looked sickly after a while.. . . . . . .

        3 inches is a lot of mulch . . . .  depending on the moisture conditions around the plant  it may be much too much mulch . . .  . .  especially if the mulch is closer than 6 inches from   the base of the plant.   Do scrape the much away from the stem to a diameter of about 6-8 inches.

        Nick Yarmoshuk
        St. Catharines ON Canada.  
        http://www.rhodoniagara.org

        On Thu, Jun 30, 2011 at 5:01 PM, David Nanney <dnanney@...> wrote:
         

        Natalie, we use hardwood mulch all the time without a problem in Springfield, Va.  As long as the mulch is not piled up on the base of the plant (a problem with any mulch), it should be fine.
        Dave Nanney
        Springfield, Va
        But cool for two weeks in Seattle with our granddaughter

        Sent from my iPhone

        On Jun 30, 2011, at 11:54 AM, natalie gluck <nsgluck@...> wrote:

         

        Hello, azalea lovers,
         
        A lawn service put 3" deep of hardwood mulch under my large, mature azaleas in northern Virginia, near Washington DC (zone 6B). The azaleas are each about 6-8 feet wide, and 4-6 feet tall. There are 2 rows of azaleas, each about 60 feet long, so it would be very difficult for me to remove the mulch and re-do it all with pine mulch. (I didn't know they were using hardwood.)
         
        Will this one-time application hurt my plants? (I will make sure pine is used in the future.) What, if any, corrective gardening action should I take? Should I wait and see if my plants look yellow or sick, or will that be too late?   
         
        Thanks,
        Natalie




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        WebRep
        Overall rating
         

      • bsperling
        As the original question was about hardwood mulch, I have to repeat what Don Voss told me: hardwood mulch is much more resistant to water penetration than
        Message 3 of 6 , Jul 1, 2011
          As the original question was about hardwood mulch, I have to repeat
          what Don Voss told me: hardwood mulch is much more resistant to water
          penetration than pine bark is, due to the formation of a fungus on it
          (different than root rot fungus). I don't see a reason NOT to use pine
          bark (or other more locally abundant non-hardwood mulches).
          Barry


          Nicholas Yarmoshuk wrote:
          >
          >
          > Our experience with a recent demonstration garden planting has been that
          > inexperienced, over-zealous mulchers have actually piled on mulch that
          > resulted in phythopthera root rot. The plants really looked sickly
          > after a while.. . . . . . .
          >
          > 3 inches is a lot of mulch . . . . depending on the moisture conditions
          > around the plant it may be much too much mulch . . . . . especially
          > if the mulch is closer than 6 inches from the base of the plant. Do
          > scrape the much away from the stem to a diameter of about 6-8 inches.
          >
          > Nick Yarmoshuk
          > St. Catharines ON Canada.
          > http://www.rhodoniagara.org
          >
          > On Thu, Jun 30, 2011 at 5:01 PM, David Nanney <dnanney@...
          > <mailto:dnanney@...>> wrote:
          >
          > __
          >
          > Natalie, we use hardwood mulch all the time without a problem in
          > Springfield, Va. As long as the mulch is not piled up on the base
          > of the plant (a problem with any mulch), it should be fine.
          > Dave Nanney
          > Springfield, Va
          > But cool for two weeks in Seattle with our granddaughter
          >
          > Sent from my iPhone
          >
          > On Jun 30, 2011, at 11:54 AM, natalie gluck <nsgluck@...
          > <mailto:nsgluck@...>> wrote:
          >
          >> Hello, azalea lovers,
          >> A lawn service put 3" deep of hardwood mulch under my large,
          >> mature azaleas in northern Virginia, near Washington DC (zone 6B).
          >> The azaleas are each about 6-8 feet wide, and 4-6 feet tall. There
          >> are 2 rows of azaleas, each about 60 feet long, so it would be
          >> very difficult for me to remove the mulch and re-do it all with
          >> pine mulch. (I didn't know they were using hardwood.)
          >> Will this one-time application hurt my plants? (I will make sure
          >> pine is used in the future.) What, if any, corrective gardening
          >> action should I take? Should I wait and see if my plants look
          >> yellow or sick, or will that be too late?
          >> Thanks,
          >> Natalie
          >>
          >
          >
          >
          > --
          >
          > WebRep
          > Overall rating
          >
          >
        • michael.campbell3@comcast.net
          It will be fine, just pretend it never happened. ... From: natalie gluck To: azaleas@yahoogroups.com Sent: Thursday, June 30, 2011
          Message 4 of 6 , Jul 1, 2011
            It will be fine, just pretend it never happened.


            From: "natalie gluck" <nsgluck@...>
            To: azaleas@yahoogroups.com
            Sent: Thursday, June 30, 2011 1:54:45 PM
            Subject: [AZ] [this is from the ASK US page, so please send me a CC] - hardwood mulch put on azaleas by mistake

             

            Hello, azalea lovers,
             
            A lawn service put 3" deep of hardwood mulch under my large, mature azaleas in northern Virginia, near Washington DC (zone 6B). The azaleas are each about 6-8 feet wide, and 4-6 feet tall. There are 2 rows of azaleas, each about 60 feet long, so it would be very difficult for me to remove the mulch and re-do it all with pine mulch. (I didn't know they were using hardwood.)
             
            Will this one-time application hurt my plants? (I will make sure pine is used in the future.) What, if any, corrective gardening action should I take? Should I wait and see if my plants look yellow or sick, or will that be too late?   
             
            Thanks,
            Natalie

          • Steve Henning
            Original message sent to Natalie: Hi Natalie, Thanks for asking the azalea group. I can see two possible problems with the hardwood mulch. 1) If you were
            Message 5 of 6 , Jul 2, 2011
              Original message sent to Natalie:

              Hi Natalie,

              Thanks for asking the azalea group.

              I can see two possible problems with the hardwood mulch.

              1)  If you were depending upon the pine mulch to help maintain the acidity of the soil, hardwood mulch won't.  Most any conifer mulch will, but not hardwood mulch.  This is easy to compensate for, by sprinkling powdered sulfur on the mulch to help acidify the soil.

              2) Hardwood mulch hosts artillery fungus (Sphaerobolus  stellatuswhich shoots insidious tar ball like objects (spore cases) at least 6 feet and probably further.  These black objects stick to anything they strike.  If they are near a car, house or fence, it becomes plastered with these black spots.  They are virtually impossible to remove from anything except glass without damaging the surface.  We put a white fence around a planting surrounding a pond garden.   This planting was mulched with hardwood mulch.  After a year we noticed the white fence was getting defaced with artillery fungus spore cases, especially in shadier areas.  We covered the hardwood mulch with pine bark mulch.  That has stopped the problem.

              Good luck!

              Steve Henning
              Reading, PA  USA  Z6
              --- In azaleas@yahoogroups.com, natalie gluck <nsgluck@...> wrote:
              >
              > Hello, azalea lovers,
              >  
              > A lawn service put 3" deep of hardwood mulch under my large, mature azaleas in northern Virginia, near Washington DC (zone 6B). The azaleas are each about 6-8 feet wide, and 4-6 feet tall. There are 2 rows of azaleas, each about 60 feet long, so it would be very difficult for me to remove the mulch and re-do it all with pine mulch. (I didn't know they were using hardwood.)
              >  
              > Will this one-time application hurt my plants? (I will make sure pine is used in the future.) What, if any, corrective gardening action should I take? Should I wait and see if my plants look yellow or sick, or will that be too late?   
              >  
              > Thanks,
              > Natalie
              >
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