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Rooting cuttings

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  • prometheus4096
    I have been using 50/50 perlite and milled peat. I stuck some cuttings into draining pots filled with this mix last week. I pinched out the new growth and the
    Message 1 of 6 , Jun 24, 2011
      I have been using 50/50 perlite and milled peat. I stuck some cuttings into draining pots filled with this mix last week. I pinched out the new growth and the larger 2 to 4 leaves. They look fine.

      I keep my pots outside in the shade under a roof.

      I also received some cuttings from the UK. Sadly they were in the mail for 7 days. The sender wrapped them in wet kitchen paper and put that in bags. I put them in the pots the way I received them. Those don't look so good. Some started to wilt and hang their 'heads' down so I pinched out the new growth tips and cut in half some leaves.

      Yesterday I put some more cuttings in these pots from an azalea with very long new growth twigs. These cuttings were not yet quite yellowish/getting hardwood.
      I didn't remove the growth tips from these either.

      Today I found some of them already getting limp because of lost moisture.

      Is the most tender growth of the cuttings going limp normal? Is the solution to take the cutting later ot to try getting higher humidity with a plastic bag?
      I can put the pots in dishes, seal it all in a bag and put it inside. Is that better? The weather gets pretty cold during the night for summer time here.


      I haven't seen any real consensus about how many leaves to leave on a cutting, about removing or not removing the tips and about wounding or scraping off some of the bark.



      I tried to root some cuttings last year but I probably took them too late. I only had maple cuttings root. No azalea cuttings. In march I also took some cuttings from an indoor florist azalea. Didn't root either.


      Mark
    • Ron Rabideau
      Mark, You have answered your own question. Yes, you do need higher humidity for your cuttings. You can do this with plastic bags, a mist set up or I ve even
      Message 2 of 6 , Jun 25, 2011
        Mark,
        You have answered your own question. Yes, you do need higher humidity for
        your cuttings. You can do this with plastic bags, a mist set up or I've
        even heard of someone using inverted glass jars over cuttings stuck in the
        ground. Alternatively you could make or find a clear plastic box or
        tent.(A Nearing frame would be a fancy example of this) Make sure with
        any plastic enclosure that it gets no direct sun as the plants will fry.
        Also your friend from the UK should not have used wet paper. We ship and
        receive lots of cuttings in the mail. The best way is to just put the
        cuttings in a zip lock bag-don't wet them or put wet paper in with them.
        Leave some air in the bag-don't press it all out. Any water lost by the
        cuttings will quickly cause humidity to reach 100% inside the sealed bag
        and stop further drying out. Water causes rot and disease problems. Also
        you said you used "milled" sphagnum. If this is the really fine kind, it
        is no good. You need coarse peat. The objective is to create a coarse
        medium so oxygen can get into it. 50-50 peat/perlite is good.

        Ron Rabideau

        On Fri, 24 Jun 2011 13:13:17 -0400, prometheus4096
        <prometheus4096@...> wrote:

        > I have been using 50/50 perlite and milled peat. I stuck some cuttings
        > into draining pots filled with this mix last week. I pinched out the new
        > growth and the larger 2 to 4 leaves. They look fine.
        >
        > I keep my pots outside in the shade under a roof.
        >
        > I also received some cuttings from the UK. Sadly they were in the mail
        > for 7 days. The sender wrapped them in wet kitchen paper and put that in
        > bags. I put them in the pots the way I received them. Those don't look
        > so good. Some started to wilt and hang their 'heads' down so I pinched
        > out the new growth tips and cut in half some leaves.
        >
        > Yesterday I put some more cuttings in these pots from an azalea with
        > very long new growth twigs. These cuttings were not yet quite
        > yellowish/getting hardwood.
        > I didn't remove the growth tips from these either.
        >
        > Today I found some of them already getting limp because of lost moisture.
        >
        > Is the most tender growth of the cuttings going limp normal? Is the
        > solution to take the cutting later ot to try getting higher humidity
        > with a plastic bag?
        > I can put the pots in dishes, seal it all in a bag and put it inside. Is
        > that better? The weather gets pretty cold during the night for summer
        > time here.
        >
        >
        > I haven't seen any real consensus about how many leaves to leave on a
        > cutting, about removing or not removing the tips and about wounding or
        > scraping off some of the bark.
        >
        >
        >
        > I tried to root some cuttings last year but I probably took them too
        > late. I only had maple cuttings root. No azalea cuttings. In march I
        > also took some cuttings from an indoor florist azalea. Didn't root
        > either.
        >
        >
        > Mark
        >
        >


        --
        Ron Rabideau
        Camden, NJ
        Zone 6b-7a
      • Mark
        Hi Ron, Thanks for your comments. How fine it is you can see in my other message regarding peat. It has pictures of what I have. I put the cuttings inside bags
        Message 3 of 6 , Jun 25, 2011
          Hi Ron,

          Thanks for your comments.

          How fine it is you can see in my other message regarding peat. It has pictures of what I have.

          I put the cuttings inside bags and put them inside the house. Can I keep the bags closed for 6 weeks or longer or should I check for fungus and drying out?

          Mark

          --- On Sat, 6/25/11, Ron Rabideau <rhodyrex@...> wrote:

          From: Ron Rabideau <rhodyrex@...>
          Subject: Re: [AZ] Rooting cuttings
          To: azaleas@yahoogroups.com
          Date: Saturday, June 25, 2011, 1:57 PM

          Mark,
          You have answered your own question. Yes, you do need higher humidity for 
          your cuttings. You can do this with plastic bags, a mist set up or I've 
          even heard of someone using inverted glass jars over cuttings stuck in the 
          ground. Alternatively you could make or find  a clear plastic box or 
          tent.(A Nearing frame would be a fancy example of this) Make sure  with 
          any plastic enclosure that it gets no direct sun as the plants will fry.   
          Also your friend from the UK should not have used wet paper. We ship and 
          receive lots of cuttings in the mail. The best way is to just put the 
          cuttings in a zip lock bag-don't wet them or put wet paper in with them. 
          Leave some air in the bag-don't press it all out. Any water lost by the 
          cuttings will quickly cause humidity to reach 100% inside the sealed bag 
          and stop further drying out. Water causes rot and disease problems. Also 
          you said you used "milled" sphagnum. If this is the really fine kind, it 
          is no good. You need coarse peat. The objective is to create a coarse 
          medium so oxygen can get into it. 50-50 peat/perlite is good.

          Ron Rabideau

        • Ron Rabideau
          Mark, I would check the bags just to be sure but if they are sealed they shouln t dry out and fungus is unlikely. Ron ... -- Ron Rabideau Camden, NJ Zone 6b-7a
          Message 4 of 6 , Jun 26, 2011
            Mark,
            I would check the bags just to be sure but if they are sealed they
            shouln't dry out and fungus is unlikely.

            Ron


            On Sat, 25 Jun 2011 14:42:58 -0400, Mark <prometheus4096@...> wrote:

            > Hi Ron,
            >
            > Thanks for your comments.
            >
            > How fine it is you can see in my other message regarding peat. It has
            > pictures of what I have.
            >
            > I put the cuttings inside bags and put them inside the house. Can I keep
            > the bags closed for 6 weeks or longer or should I check for fungus and
            > drying out?
            >
            > Mark
            >
            > --- On Sat, 6/25/11, Ron Rabideau <rhodyrex@...> wrote:
            >
            > From: Ron Rabideau <rhodyrex@...>
            > Subject: Re: [AZ] Rooting cuttings
            > To: azaleas@yahoogroups.com
            > Date: Saturday, June 25, 2011, 1:57 PM
            >
            > Mark,
            > You have answered your own question. Yes, you do need higher humidity for
            > your cuttings. You can do this with plastic bags, a mist set up or I've
            > even heard of someone using inverted glass jars over cuttings stuck in
            > theground. Alternatively you could make or find a clear plastic box or
            > tent.(A Nearing frame would be a fancy example of this) Make sure with
            > any plastic enclosure that it gets no direct sun as the plants will
            > fry. Also your friend from the UK should not have used wet paper. We
            > ship andreceive lots of cuttings in the mail. The best way is to just
            > put thecuttings in a zip lock bag-don't wet them or put wet paper in
            > with them.Leave some air in the bag-don't press it all out. Any water
            > lost by thecuttings will quickly cause humidity to reach 100% inside the
            > sealed bagand stop further drying out. Water causes rot and disease
            > problems. Alsoyou said you used "milled" sphagnum. If this is the really
            > fine kind, itis no good. You need coarse peat. The objective is to
            > create a coarsemedium so oxygen can get into it. 50-50 peat/perlite is
            > good.
            >
            > Ron Rabideau
            >


            --
            Ron Rabideau
            Camden, NJ
            Zone 6b-7a
          • Mark
            I put many cutting pots into bags as kind of suggested. Today I checked on them. Many have turned brown. They seem to turn brown from the stem into the leaves.
            Message 5 of 6 , Jul 2, 2011
              I put many cutting pots into bags as kind of suggested. Today I checked on them. Many have turned brown.
              They seem to turn brown from the stem into the leaves.

              http://i563.photobucket.com/albums/ss73/Harunobu/IMG_3055.jpg
              http://i563.photobucket.com/albums/ss73/Harunobu/IMG_3052.jpg

              Is this because of the stagnant air causing fungus? I put them in bags as suggested. I don't think it's lack of water or too much water.
              Not all are affected, it seems.

              I think I am going to take them all outside.

              I have some still outside. They are not brown. The weather has been pretty cold outside for summer time the last few days. Dropping to 7C/45F to 20C/68F during the day at max.

              I am going to try Creel's method today with some new cuttings. Maybe the inside attic hotness, humidity and stagnant air just kills them.

              Can it be they don't do well because they were cut with a concave pruning scissors that cuts by crushing? I am going to try a sharp razorblade this time.

              I know that inside bags sunlight will kill them, but would artificial light help? It's not really bright where they were put but not much darker than outside shade either.

              Mark

              --- On Sat, 6/25/11, Ron Rabideau <rhodyrex@...> wrote:

              From: Ron Rabideau <rhodyrex@...>
              Subject: Re: [AZ] Rooting cuttings
              To: azaleas@yahoogroups.com
              Date: Saturday, June 25, 2011, 1:57 PM

              Mark,
              You have answered your own question. Yes, you do need higher humidity for 
              your cuttings. You can do this with plastic bags, a mist set up or I've 
              even heard of someone using inverted glass jars over cuttings stuck in the 
              ground. Alternatively you could make or find  a clear plastic box or 
              tent.(A Nearing frame would be a fancy example of this) Make sure  with 
              any plastic enclosure that it gets no direct sun as the plants will fry.   
              Also your friend from the UK should not have used wet paper. We ship and 
              receive lots of cuttings in the mail. The best way is to just put the 
              cuttings in a zip lock bag-don't wet them or put wet paper in with them. 
              Leave some air in the bag-don't press it all out. Any water lost by the 
              cuttings will quickly cause humidity to reach 100% inside the sealed bag 
              and stop further drying out. Water causes rot and disease problems. Also 
              you said you used "milled" sphagnum. If this is the really fine kind, it 
              is no good. You need coarse peat. The objective is to create a coarse 
              medium so oxygen can get into it. 50-50 peat/perlite is good.

              Ron Rabideau

              On Fri, 24 Jun 2011 13:13:17 -0400, prometheus4096 
              <prometheus4096@...> wrote:

              > I have been using 50/50 perlite and milled peat. I stuck some cuttings 
              > into draining pots filled with this mix last week. I pinched out the new 
              > growth and the larger 2 to 4 leaves. They look fine.
              >
              > I keep my pots outside in the shade under a roof.
              >
              > I also received some cuttings from the UK. Sadly they were in the mail 
              > for 7 days. The sender wrapped them in wet kitchen paper and put that in 
              > bags. I put them in the pots the way I received them. Those don't look 
              > so good. Some started to wilt and hang their 'heads' down so I pinched 
              > out the new growth tips and cut in half some leaves.
              >
              > Yesterday I put some more cuttings in these pots from an azalea with 
              > very long new growth twigs. These cuttings were not yet quite 
              > yellowish/getting hardwood.
              > I didn't remove the growth tips from these either.
              >
              > Today I found some of them already getting limp because of lost moisture.
              >
              > Is the most tender growth of the cuttings going limp normal? Is the 
              > solution to take the cutting later ot to try getting higher humidity 
              > with a plastic bag?
              > I can put the pots in dishes, seal it all in a bag and put it inside. Is 
              > that better? The weather gets pretty cold during the night for summer 
              > time here.
              >
              >
              > I haven't seen any real consensus about how many leaves to leave on a 
              > cutting, about removing or not removing the tips and about wounding or 
              > scraping off some of the bark.
              >
              >
              >
              > I tried to root some cuttings last year but I probably took them too 
              > late. I only had maple cuttings root. No azalea cuttings. In march I 
              > also took some cuttings from an indoor florist azalea. Didn't root 
              > either.
              >
              >
              > Mark
              >
              >


              --
              Ron Rabideau
              Camden, NJ
              Zone 6b-7a


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            • Ron Rabideau
              Mark, That brown looks like a fungal disease such as phytopthera. It happens sometimes. In the future you could try disinfecting the cuttings(and all your
              Message 6 of 6 , Jul 3, 2011
                Mark,
                That brown looks like a fungal disease such as phytopthera. It happens
                sometimes. In the future you could try disinfecting the cuttings(and all
                your pots) with a 10% Clorox bleach solution before sticking them. An
                ideal temp is prob about 75-85F. Yes, the sharp razor would be better.

                Ron

                On Sun, 03 Jul 2011 01:24:50 -0400, Mark <prometheus4096@...> wrote:

                > I put many cutting pots into bags as kind of suggested. Today I checked
                > on them. Many have turned brown.
                > They seem to turn brown from the stem into the leaves.
                >
                > http://i563.photobucket.com/albums/ss73/Harunobu/IMG_3055.jpg
                > http://i563.photobucket.com/albums/ss73/Harunobu/IMG_3052.jpg
                >
                > Is this because of the stagnant air causing fungus? I put them in bags
                > as suggested. I don't think it's lack of water or too much water.
                > Not all are affected, it seems.
                >
                > I think I am going to take them all outside.
                >
                > I have some still outside. They are not brown. The weather has been
                > pretty cold outside for summer time the last few days. Dropping to
                > 7C/45F to 20C/68F during the day at max.
                >
                > I am going to try Creel's method today with some new cuttings. Maybe the
                > inside attic hotness, humidity and stagnant air just kills them.
                >
                > Can it be they don't do well because they were cut with a concave
                > pruning scissors that cuts by crushing? I am going to try a sharp
                > razorblade this time.
                >
                > I know that inside bags sunlight will kill them, but would artificial
                > light help? It's not really bright where they were put but not much
                > darker than outside shade either.
                >
                > Mark
                >
                > --- On Sat, 6/25/11, Ron Rabideau <rhodyrex@...> wrote:
                >
                > From: Ron Rabideau <rhodyrex@...>
                > Subject: Re: [AZ] Rooting cuttings
                > To: azaleas@yahoogroups.com
                > Date: Saturday, June 25, 2011, 1:57 PM
                >
                > Mark,
                > You have answered your own question. Yes, you do need higher humidity for
                > your cuttings. You can do this with plastic bags, a mist set up or I've
                > even heard of someone using inverted glass jars over cuttings stuck in
                > theground. Alternatively you could make or find a clear plastic box or
                > tent.(A Nearing frame would be a fancy example of this) Make sure with
                > any plastic enclosure that it gets no direct sun as the plants will
                > fry. Also your friend from the UK should not have used wet paper. We
                > ship andreceive lots of cuttings in the mail. The best way is to just
                > put thecuttings in a zip lock bag-don't wet them or put wet paper in
                > with them.Leave some air in the bag-don't press it all out. Any water
                > lost by thecuttings will quickly cause humidity to reach 100% inside the
                > sealed bagand stop further drying out. Water causes rot and disease
                > problems. Alsoyou said you used "milled" sphagnum. If this is the really
                > fine kind, itis no good. You need coarse peat. The objective is to
                > create a coarsemedium so oxygen can get into it. 50-50 peat/perlite is
                > good.
                >
                > Ron Rabideau
                >
                > On Fri, 24 Jun 2011 13:13:17 -0400, prometheus4096
                > <prometheus4096@...> wrote:
                >
                >> I have been using 50/50 perlite and milled peat. I stuck some cuttings
                >> into draining pots filled with this mix last week. I pinched out the new
                >> growth and the larger 2 to 4 leaves. They look fine.
                >>
                >> I keep my pots outside in the shade under a roof.
                >>
                >> I also received some cuttings from the UK. Sadly they were in the mail
                >> for 7 days. The sender wrapped them in wet kitchen paper and put that in
                >> bags. I put them in the pots the way I received them. Those don't look
                >> so good. Some started to wilt and hang their 'heads' down so I pinched
                >> out the new growth tips and cut in half some leaves.
                >>
                >> Yesterday I put some more cuttings in these pots from an azalea with
                >> very long new growth twigs. These cuttings were not yet quite
                >> yellowish/getting hardwood.
                >> I didn't remove the growth tips from these either.
                >>
                >> Today I found some of them already getting limp because of lost
                >> moisture.
                >>
                >> Is the most tender growth of the cuttings going limp normal? Is the
                >> solution to take the cutting later ot to try getting higher humidity
                >> with a plastic bag?
                >> I can put the pots in dishes, seal it all in a bag and put it inside. Is
                >> that better? The weather gets pretty cold during the night for summer
                >> time here.
                >>
                >>
                >> I haven't seen any real consensus about how many leaves to leave on a
                >> cutting, about removing or not removing the tips and about wounding or
                >> scraping off some of the bark.
                >>
                >>
                >>
                >> I tried to root some cuttings last year but I probably took them too
                >> late. I only had maple cuttings root. No azalea cuttings. In march I
                >> also took some cuttings from an indoor florist azalea. Didn't root
                >> either.
                >>
                >>
                >> Mark
                >>
                >>
                >
                >


                --
                Ron Rabideau
                Camden, NJ
                Zone 6b-7a
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