Loading ...
Sorry, an error occurred while loading the content.

Re: [AZ] azalea

Expand Messages
  • George Klump
    31 March 2011 Doreen, You can move the azaleas now, if you are careful. By that I mean that you will need to dig out a tad beyond the drip line which should
    Message 1 of 21 , Mar 31 9:39 PM
    • 0 Attachment
      31 March 2011

      Doreen,

      You can move the azaleas now, if you are careful.  By that I mean that you will need to dig out a tad beyond the drip line which should be beyond the roots a tad.  You won't need to go very deep, maybe eight inches, but you will need to dig probably 80% of the diameter before removing it from the soil by leverage. 

      The next consideration is to be very careful where you replant the azaleas.  Oak tree roots can be invasive, especially if the oak trees are deciduous, as those roots will tend to be rather shallow and could get in the way of the azalea roots and kill the azaleas or at least make their lives difficult.

      Then, if the root ball is about six inches deep, then, I would suggest making the hole no deeper than about eight inches.  If the diameter of it is, say, twelve inches, then, make the diameter of the hole at least eighteen inches. 

      Just to make sure and to reduce the shock of transplanting the azaleas, I would make a mixture of coarse peat moss, perlite and some good shredded bark in equal parts by volume.  Just "eyeball" it.  Don't use any soil in the mixture.  If you feel you have to, then, I would suggest not adding more than 10% of native soil thoroughly mixed.  Now fill the hole about two-thirds of the way with the mixture, run the hose on it till it becomes a "soup" and watch how fast it drains.  It should be fairly rapid.  Set the plant in the middle of it [after it has drained] and fill it the rest of the way to about one inch below the crown of the azalea.  Water the whole thing once more to make another "soup" and walk away.  When you get to the Fourth of July, put about a cupful of cottonseed meal around each azalea, dry, of course, and water it in gently.  Then, do it again on Labor Day and no more. 

      I suggest cottonseed meal for several reasons one of them being that it is organic, slow acting and will not burn, if used as suggested.  In replanting an azalea you do not want a fast acting inorganic fertilizer.  And there are some other good reasons, but that's enough for now.

      George E. Klump
      Southern California Chapter, ARS/ASA 











      On 3/31/2011 4:44 PM, Dg1205114@... wrote:
       

      this is from the Ask US page, so please send me a cc. I'm about to re do my front in front of my house. It doesnot get a lot of  water  and gets afternoon sun. I have two azaleas that have done o.k. there. I have to move them . I am in raleigh n.c. I think it is in zone 9 ? Can i move them now? The biggest I want to move under some oak trees with some others. I love azaleas but not have  good luck with them. These are about 5yrs old and would  them to live. Any help would be greatly appreciated
       Thanks
      Doreen

    • George Klump
      Message 2 of 21 , Apr 1, 2011
      • 0 Attachment
        On 3/31/2011 9:39 PM, George Klump wrote:
         

        31 March 2011

        Doreen,

        You can move the azaleas now, if you are careful.  By that I mean that you will need to dig out a tad beyond the drip line which should be beyond the roots a tad.  You won't need to go very deep, maybe eight inches, but you will need to dig probably 80% of the circumferencer before removing it from the soil by leverage. 

        The next consideration is to be very careful where you replant the azaleas.  Oak tree roots can be invasive, especially if the oak trees are deciduous, as those roots will tend to be rather shallow and could get in the way of the azalea roots and kill the azaleas or at least make their lives difficult.

        Then, if the root ball is about six inches deep, then, I would suggest making the hole no deeper than about eight inches.  If the diameter of it is, say, twelve inches, then, make the diameter of the hole at least eighteen inches. 

        Just to make sure and to reduce the shock of transplanting the azaleas, I would make a mixture of coarse peat moss, perlite and some good shredded bark in equal parts by volume.  Just "eyeball" it.  Don't use any soil in the mixture.  If you feel you have to, then, I would suggest not adding more than 10% of native soil thoroughly mixed.  Now fill the hole about two-thirds of the way with the mixture, run the hose on it till it becomes a "soup" and watch how fast it drains.  It should be fairly rapid.  Set the plant in the middle of it [after it has drained] and fill it the rest of the way to about one inch below the crown of the azalea.  Water the whole thing once more to make another "soup" and walk away.  When you get to the Fourth of July, put about a cupful of cottonseed meal around each azalea, dry, of course, and water it in gently.  Then, do it again on Labor Day and no more. 

        I suggest cottonseed meal for several reasons one of them being that it is organic, slow acting and will not burn, if used as suggested.  In replanting an azalea you do not want a fast acting inorganic fertilizer.  And there are some other good reasons, but that's enough for now.

        George E. Klump
        Southern California Chapter, ARS/ASA 











        On 3/31/2011 4:44 PM, Dg1205114@... wrote:
         

        this is from the Ask US page, so please send me a cc. I'm about to re do my front in front of my house. It doesnot get a lot of  water  and gets afternoon sun. I have two azaleas that have done o.k. there. I have to move them . I am in raleigh n.c. I think it is in zone 9 ? Can i move them now? The biggest I want to move under some oak trees with some others. I love azaleas but not have  good luck with them. These are about 5yrs old and would  them to live. Any help would be greatly appreciated
         Thanks
        Doreen


      • Nicholas Yarmoshuk
        *George . . . in your last sentence you say . . .* And there are some other good reasons, but that s enough for now. . . . . *what are those other
        Message 3 of 21 , Apr 1, 2011
        • 0 Attachment
          George . . .  in your last sentence you say . . . "And there are some other good reasons, but that's enough for now." . . . .  what are those other reasons?

          Nick Yarmoshuk
          St. Catharines ON Canada

          On Fri, Apr 1, 2011 at 12:39 AM, George Klump <mixturev@...> wrote:
           

          31 March 2011

          Doreen,

          You can move the azaleas now, if you are careful.  By that I mean that you will need to dig out a tad beyond the drip line which should be beyond the roots a tad.  You won't need to go very deep, maybe eight inches, but you will need to dig probably 80% of the diameter before removing it from the soil by leverage. 

          The next consideration is to be very careful where you replant the azaleas.  Oak tree roots can be invasive, especially if the oak trees are deciduous, as those roots will tend to be rather shallow and could get in the way of the azalea roots and kill the azaleas or at least make their lives difficult.

          Then, if the root ball is about six inches deep, then, I would suggest making the hole no deeper than about eight inches.  If the diameter of it is, say, twelve inches, then, make the diameter of the hole at least eighteen inches. 

          Just to make sure and to reduce the shock of transplanting the azaleas, I would make a mixture of coarse peat moss, perlite and some good shredded bark in equal parts by volume.  Just "eyeball" it.  Don't use any soil in the mixture.  If you feel you have to, then, I would suggest not adding more than 10% of native soil thoroughly mixed.  Now fill the hole about two-thirds of the way with the mixture, run the hose on it till it becomes a "soup" and watch how fast it drains.  It should be fairly rapid.  Set the plant in the middle of it [after it has drained] and fill it the rest of the way to about one inch below the crown of the azalea.  Water the whole thing once more to make another "soup" and walk away.  When you get to the Fourth of July, put about a cupful of cottonseed meal around each azalea, dry, of course, and water it in gently.  Then, do it again on Labor Day and no more. 

          I suggest cottonseed meal for several reasons one of them being that it is organic, slow acting and will not burn, if used as suggested.  In replanting an azalea you do not want a fast acting inorganic fertilizer.  And there are some other good reasons, but that's enough for now.

          George E. Klump
          Southern California Chapter, ARS/ASA 











          On 3/31/2011 4:44 PM, Dg1205114@... wrote:
           

          this is from the Ask US page, so please send me a cc. I'm about to re do my front in front of my house. It doesnot get a lot of  water  and gets afternoon sun. I have two azaleas that have done o.k. there. I have to move them . I am in raleigh n.c. I think it is in zone 9 ? Can i move them now? The biggest I want to move under some oak trees with some others. I love azaleas but not have  good luck with them. These are about 5yrs old and would  them to live. Any help would be greatly appreciated
           Thanks
          Doreen


        • George Klump
          1 April 2011 Well, for one thing, Nick, a newly planted azalea [in this case tramsplanted] has hardly had any time to reestablish itself, e.g. feeder roots
          Message 4 of 21 , Apr 1, 2011
          • 0 Attachment
            1 April 2011

            Well, for one thing, Nick, a newly planted azalea [in this case tramsplanted] has hardly had any time to reestablish itself, e.g. feeder roots getting themselves in place, plant stabilizing itself in the ground and becoming generally acclimated to its new surroundings.  Sometimes people add a chemical fertilizer to the plant thinking that this will get it off to a good fast start.  More often than not this merely burns the plant irreparably and it croaks.  Then, the one doing the planting gets all upset and thinks everything advised had to be wrong.  So I don't fertilize any of my newly planted azaleas [or any Ericaceae for that matter] for several weeks.  Then, I use my feeding formula of Easter, Fourth of July and Labor Day, about a cupful around each plant, dry, of course, and, then, watered in gently.  I have come to using cottonseed meal for just about all of my plants, since it 1] is organic 2] is therefore slow to release and 3] because of all the foregoing it doesn't burn the plants.  In addition to this it tends to encourage mychorriza in the soil which is most beneficial for the plants, since these microbial guests turn soil nutrients into water soluble forms which the feeder roots can use.  Some people think the big roots on the azaleas feed the plant.  Their function is more to stabilize the plant in the ground, though I'm sure they can absorb food, too.  But it's the feeder roots which do the real work. . . .which is why the soil has to be light, else these tiny roots won't penetrate and the plant eventually gives up the ghost.  That's why I advocate placing azaleas and other such plants in the ground.  They do not work as well in pots and often will croak in a pot after 2 or 3 years.  And there are reasons for that, too, e.g. salt build up, roots getting tangled, roots circling looking for space to spread and sometimes wind up choking the plant.  This isn't to say that plants cannot be kept in pots, especially in cold climates.  But it is to say that in so doing, a lot of extra care must be devoted to them, e.g. leaching out the salts at least annually, keeping drainage on the rapid side, repotting after a time to a larger pot to give the plant more room as it grows.  Things like this.  And I recognize a necessary modification of my feeding times in colder climate zones, i.e. Easter might be too early [but not this year] and Labor Day might be a bit late in the season.  So back up the Labor Day feeding by two or three weeks and/or push the Easter feeding ahead by the same amount, if climate factors warrant.

            I grant, too, that plants which can be cold sensitive in some case, e.g. cold, dry winter winds which desiccate plants, really cannot be planted outside in the ground, if it is a sure thing that the winter temperatures will kill the plants.  That's pointless.  Sometimes those plants will survive, if the ground in their root zones is kept moist.  If a cold, dry wind is forecast, then, the ground should be soaked.  The water in the root zone will prevent desiccation.  A desiccated plant is a desecrated plant I always say.  If the plants can be thoroughly watered ahead of the storm and the temperature is not a real enemy of the plants, then, fine.  But, as you might guess, most people do not want to go to this trouble having to saturate the root zones of their plants every time a cold, dry wind is forecast during the winter.  They may have other priorities.  And the plants may not be on this list of things to do.  Nevertheless, all other factors being equal, I'm with White Smith on this issue.  Plants work better in the ground, whenever this is possible.

            George E. Klump
            Southern California Chapter, ARS/ASA

             






            On 4/1/2011 12:28 PM, Nicholas Yarmoshuk wrote:  

            George . . .  in your last sentence you say . . . "And there are some other good reasons, but that's enough for now." . . . .  what are those other reasons?

            Nick Yarmoshuk
            St. Catharines ON Canada

            On Fri, Apr 1, 2011 at 12:39 AM, George Klump <mixturev@...> wrote:
             

            31 March 2011

            Doreen,

            You can move the azaleas now, if you are careful.  By that I mean that you will need to dig out a tad beyond the drip line which should be beyond the roots a tad.  You won't need to go very deep, maybe eight inches, but you will need to dig probably 80% of the diameter before removing it from the soil by leverage. 

            The next consideration is to be very careful where you replant the azaleas.  Oak tree roots can be invasive, especially if the oak trees are deciduous, as those roots will tend to be rather shallow and could get in the way of the azalea roots and kill the azaleas or at least make their lives difficult.

            Then, if the root ball is about six inches deep, then, I would suggest making the hole no deeper than about eight inches.  If the diameter of it is, say, twelve inches, then, make the diameter of the hole at least eighteen inches. 

            Just to make sure and to reduce the shock of transplanting the azaleas, I would make a mixture of coarse peat moss, perlite and some good shredded bark in equal parts by volume.  Just "eyeball" it.  Don't use any soil in the mixture.  If you feel you have to, then, I would suggest not adding more than 10% of native soil thoroughly mixed.  Now fill the hole about two-thirds of the way with the mixture, run the hose on it till it becomes a "soup" and watch how fast it drains.  It should be fairly rapid.  Set the plant in the middle of it [after it has drained] and fill it the rest of the way to about one inch below the crown of the azalea.  Water the whole thing once more to make another "soup" and walk away.  When you get to the Fourth of July, put about a cupful of cottonseed meal around each azalea, dry, of course, and water it in gently.  Then, do it again on Labor Day and no more. 

            I suggest cottonseed meal for several reasons one of them being that it is organic, slow acting and will not burn, if used as suggested.  In replanting an azalea you do not want a fast acting inorganic fertilizer.  And there are some other good reasons, but that's enough for now.

            George E. Klump
            Southern California Chapter, ARS/ASA 











            On 3/31/2011 4:44 PM, Dg1205114@... wrote:
             

            this is from the Ask US page, so please send me a cc. I'm about to re do my front in front of my house. It doesnot get a lot of  water  and gets afternoon sun. I have two azaleas that have done o.k. there. I have to move them . I am in raleigh n.c. I think it is in zone 9 ? Can i move them now? The biggest I want to move under some oak trees with some others. I love azaleas but not have  good luck with them. These are about 5yrs old and would  them to live. Any help would be greatly appreciated
             Thanks
            Doreen



          • bsperling
            Hi All! Tom Boswell wrote a book called Why Time Begins On Opening Day and that is an appropriate phrase. The bulbs and ephemerals of early spring were a
            Message 5 of 21 , Apr 11, 2011
            • 0 Attachment
              Hi All!
              Tom Boswell wrote a book called "Why Time Begins On Opening Day" and
              that is an appropriate phrase. The bulbs and ephemerals of early spring
              were a prelude, but spring starts today with the first "opening day":
              The first full flower (FFF) on Dayspring opened today. This is the
              11th year I've had that variety and it is 5.5 days later than the
              average of the previous 10 FFFs. The winter was cold and dry, the
              spring was average with adequate moisture.
              I'm not expecting another FFF from other plants today or tomorrow but
              most plants are well budded and, if the deer stay away and we don't have
              days of cold rains in late April and early May the displays should be good.
              Barry, 10 mi S of DC
            • David Nanney
              Let it never be said that I am not competitive. Barry has his one FFF and my Dayspring also showed its FFF yesterday. Also Dr. James Hitchner, Indian Summer,
              Message 6 of 21 , Apr 11, 2011
              • 0 Attachment
                Let it never be said that I am not competitive. Barry has his one FFF and
                my Dayspring also showed its FFF yesterday. Also Dr. James Hitchner, Indian
                Summer, and Quest welcomed spring yesterday. Today, Amy Bittinger joined
                the celebration. I didn't remember it and really like the deep red blotch.


                While Barry has years of data to back up his "predictions", for many years I
                have simply estimated 100 days into the year as my target FFF. That let me
                get through the longest month of the year (February) by simply adding the
                days and subtracting from 100. I could manage two digits remaining better
                than thinking about all the cold weeks and months to go. This year, it was
                exactly 100 days into 2011 for the first hybrids to bloom.

                Hope to see everyone in Evansville, Ind. In a couple of weeks for the ASA
                convention. Should be fun.

                Dave Nanney
                Springfield, Va.
                86 wonderful degrees and SUNNY!!!!


                -----Original Message-----
                From: azaleas@yahoogroups.com [mailto:azaleas@yahoogroups.com] On Behalf Of
                bsperling
                Sent: Monday, April 11, 2011 9:42 AM
                To: azaleas@yahoogroups.com
                Subject: [AZ] FFF in NoVA

                Hi All!
                Tom Boswell wrote a book called "Why Time Begins On Opening Day" and

                that is an appropriate phrase. The bulbs and ephemerals of early spring
                were a prelude, but spring starts today with the first "opening day":
                The first full flower (FFF) on Dayspring opened today. This is the
                11th year I've had that variety and it is 5.5 days later than the
                average of the previous 10 FFFs. The winter was cold and dry, the
                spring was average with adequate moisture.
                I'm not expecting another FFF from other plants today or tomorrow
                but
                most plants are well budded and, if the deer stay away and we don't have
                days of cold rains in late April and early May the displays should be good.
                Barry, 10 mi S of DC


                ------------------------------------

                When you reply to an email, PLEASE quote its relevant part(s) only, as
                context, and DELETE the rest - especially this line and the Yahoo lines.
                And PLEASE tell us your city, state and/or USDA zone.

                We welcome attached images RESIZED to be under 100KB in size - 640 x 480
                pixel JPEG images at 50% or 1:40 compression are ideal. By attaching them
                you agree that, without giving up your rights to them, they may be shown on
                Azalea Society websites.

                To unsubscribe, send an email to: azaleas-unsubscribe@yahoogroups.com

                Yahoo! Groups Links
              • bsperling
                Yes, Dave, but Coral Bells opened today, 6.5 days later than the average of the previous 14 years. So, down here we re still running late (actually, that s a
                Message 7 of 21 , Apr 14, 2011
                • 0 Attachment
                  Yes, Dave, but Coral Bells opened today, 6.5 days later than the average
                  of the previous 14 years. So, down here we're still running late
                  (actually, that's a characteristic of my life. Hmmmmmm......).
                  Barry, 10 mi S of DC

                  David Nanney wrote:
                  >
                  >
                  > Let it never be said that I am not competitive. Barry has his one FFF and
                  > my Dayspring also showed its FFF yesterday. Also Dr. James Hitchner, Indian
                  > Summer, and Quest welcomed spring yesterday. Today, Amy Bittinger joined
                  > the celebration. I didn't remember it and really like the deep red blotch.
                  >
                  > While Barry has years of data to back up his "predictions", for many years I
                  > have simply estimated 100 days into the year as my target FFF. That let me
                  > get through the longest month of the year (February) by simply adding the
                  > days and subtracting from 100. I could manage two digits remaining better
                  > than thinking about all the cold weeks and months to go. This year, it was
                  > exactly 100 days into 2011 for the first hybrids to bloom.
                  >
                  > Hope to see everyone in Evansville, Ind. In a couple of weeks for the ASA
                  > convention. Should be fun.
                  >
                  > Dave Nanney
                  > Springfield, Va.
                  > 86 wonderful degrees and SUNNY!!!!
                  >
                  > -----Original Message-----
                  > From: azaleas@yahoogroups.com <mailto:azaleas%40yahoogroups.com>
                  > [mailto:azaleas@yahoogroups.com <mailto:azaleas%40yahoogroups.com>] On
                  > Behalf Of
                  > bsperling
                  > Sent: Monday, April 11, 2011 9:42 AM
                  > To: azaleas@yahoogroups.com <mailto:azaleas%40yahoogroups.com>
                  > Subject: [AZ] FFF in NoVA
                  >
                  > Hi All!
                  > Tom Boswell wrote a book called "Why Time Begins On Opening Day" and
                  >
                  > that is an appropriate phrase. The bulbs and ephemerals of early spring
                  > were a prelude, but spring starts today with the first "opening day":
                  > The first full flower (FFF) on Dayspring opened today. This is the
                  > 11th year I've had that variety and it is 5.5 days later than the
                  > average of the previous 10 FFFs. The winter was cold and dry, the
                  > spring was average with adequate moisture.
                  > I'm not expecting another FFF from other plants today or tomorrow
                  > but
                  > most plants are well budded and, if the deer stay away and we don't have
                  > days of cold rains in late April and early May the displays should be good.
                  > Barry, 10 mi S of DC
                • Joe Parody
                  two low growing azaleas, second year in ground and both dying, did bloom for two seasons, can not remember the names, pink flowers, we had a harsh winter,
                  Message 8 of 21 , Aug 20, 2011
                  • 0 Attachment
                    two  low growing azaleas, second year in ground and both dying, did bloom for two seasons, can not remember the names, pink flowers, we had a harsh winter, would like to get two more, we purchased from nursery,  fed them and water them don't know why they are dying. thank you
                  • Steve Henning
                    It would help to know where you are on the planet. Feeding and watering azaleas can be a problem. They like well drained soil. Wet soil is a serious problem
                    Message 9 of 21 , Aug 21, 2011
                    • 0 Attachment
                      It would help to know where you are on the planet.

                      Feeding and watering azaleas can be a problem.  They like well drained soil.  Wet soil is a serious problem and will usually lead to root rot which is nearly always fatal.  If fertilized at all, they should only be fed in the spring around bloom time and then fed with a good azalea fertilizer such as HollyTone at half the rate on the package. Water soluble fertilizers like Miracid are more of a problem than a solution.  They are temporary since they are water soluble.  Also they are high in nitrogen which promotes tender growth and keeps the plants from hardening off for the winter.

                      The reason azaleas die is usually the way they are planted.  If they were bought in a container, they were probably root bound.  Before planting they need to have the roots that are growing around the outside of the root ball opened up or cut.  Otherwise these roots strangle the roots inside the root ball.  I usually cut them with a box cutter.  I make vertical cuts from the top of the root ball to the bottom about every 2 or 3 inches.  Some people use a claw tool to pull out these roots so they spread out rather than circle the other roots.  When planted they should never be planted deeper then they were planted originally.  It is usually best to raise them and plant in a mound and plant in the soil a little higher than they were planted originally.

                      Other important considerations besides good drainage and proper planting are: acidic soil, partial shade, mulching and not cultivating around the shallow roots, not using a lawn fertilizer or a weed & feed product near them, don't plant near areas where salt is used in the winter, don't plant near fresh masonry where lime is leaching out into the soil, and don't plant under walnut trees or near walnut trees (they give off a toxin that kills many plants including azaleas).

                      Steve Henning, Reading, PA  USA  Z6
                      For more information, visit: http://rhodyman.net/rarhodyho.html 
                      ==============

                      --- In azaleas@yahoogroups.com, "Joe Parody" <kcolk@...> wrote:
                      >
                      > two low growing azaleas, second year in ground and both dying, did bloom for two seasons, can not remember the names, pink flowers, we had a harsh winter, would like to get two more, we purchased from nursery, fed them and water them don't know why they are dying. thank you
                      > kcolk@...
                      >
                    • Nicholas Yarmoshuk
                      There are two videos on the net should be viewed by all planters of rhodos. Steve is absolutely correct . . . . . most commercially grown rhodos and azaleas
                      Message 10 of 21 , Aug 21, 2011
                      • 0 Attachment
                        There are two videos on the net should be viewed by all planters of rhodos.
                        Steve is absolutely correct . . . . . most commercially grown rhodos and azaleas fail because they are pot bound when planted.  The first item below is from New ersey - Rarefind nursery.
                        The second is from Canada's Niagara region, Nettlecreek Nursery.

                        http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=02KxkPQdDd0&feature=related
                        http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=qdt3hnLH_8M

                        Nick Yarmoshuk
                        St. Catharines Ontario
                        Near Niagara Falls Canada

                        On Sun, Aug 21, 2011 at 8:50 AM, Steve Henning <rhodyman@...> wrote:
                         

                        It would help to know where you are on the planet.

                        Feeding and watering azaleas can be a problem.  They like well drained soil.  Wet soil is a serious problem and will usually lead to root rot which is nearly always fatal.  If fertilized at all, they should only be fed in the spring around bloom time and then fed with a good azalea fertilizer such as HollyTone at half the rate on the package. Water soluble fertilizers like Miracid are more of a problem than a solution.  They are temporary since they are water soluble.  Also they are high in nitrogen which promotes tender growth and keeps the plants from hardening off for the winter.

                        The reason azaleas die is usually the way they are planted.  If they were bought in a container, they were probably root bound.  Before planting they need to have the roots that are growing around the outside of the root ball opened up or cut.  Otherwise these roots strangle the roots inside the root ball.  I usually cut them with a box cutter.  I make vertical cuts from the top of the root ball to the bottom about every 2 or 3 inches.  Some people use a claw tool to pull out these roots so they spread out rather than circle the other roots.  When planted they should never be planted deeper then they were planted originally.  It is usually best to raise them and plant in a mound and plant in the soil a little higher than they were planted originally.

                        Other important considerations besides good drainage and proper planting are: acidic soil, partial shade, mulching and not cultivating around the shallow roots, not using a lawn fertilizer or a weed & feed product near them, don't plant near areas where salt is used in the winter, don't plant near fresh masonry where lime is leaching out into the soil, and don't plant under walnut trees or near walnut trees (they give off a toxin that kills many plants including azaleas).

                        Steve Henning, Reading, PA  USA  Z6
                        For more information, visit: http://rhodyman.net/rarhodyho.html 
                        ==============

                        --- In azaleas@yahoogroups.com, "Joe Parody" <kcolk@...> wrote:
                        >
                        > two low growing azaleas, second year in ground and both dying, did bloom for two seasons, can not remember the names, pink flowers, we had a harsh winter, would like to get two more, we purchased from nursery, fed them and water them don't know why they are dying. thank you
                        > kcolk@...
                        >




                        --

                        WebRep
                        Overall rating
                         

                      Your message has been successfully submitted and would be delivered to recipients shortly.