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Azaleas in bogs

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  • Mike Creel
    What is the wettest location that you have ever seen an azalea growing?  I know that the native species Western Azalea, Rhodora Azalea and Swamp azalea grow
    Message 1 of 3 , Feb 20, 2011
    What is the wettest location that you have ever seen an azalea growing?  I know that the native species Western Azalea, Rhodora Azalea and Swamp azalea grow sometimes in natural bogs.  I have seen the Hoary Azalea growing on small islands in a creek at my family's farm in Williamsburg County.
     
    But, I am growing a few evergreen azaleas in bog conditions that would seem fatal to the plants.  See the attached photos.  One is a Chinzan that I rooted by sticking into the edge of a large container bog, an old concrete bird bath top.  The second is my Unkever azalea that I rooted by sticking it into a floating plant buoy in our garden pond.  Both plants are thriving (and blooming), and now I have the Rhodora azalea growing in two floating pots, no flowers yet.
     
    Growing azaleas in such wet conditions solves the water and fertility problems.
     
    Mike Creel, SC USDA Zone 8a
    Nature is my Greenhouse
    Fall-Line Sandhills region
    Lexington County, South Carolina
  • bsperling
    Hi Mike, How much air do the roots get compared with evergreens in friable, well-drained soil? Barry
    Message 2 of 3 , Feb 20, 2011
    • 0 Attachment
      Hi Mike,
      How much air do the roots get compared with evergreens in friable,
      well-drained soil?
      Barry


      Mike Creel wrote:
      >
      > [Attachment(s) <#TopText> from Mike Creel included below]
      >
      > What is the wettest location that you have ever seen an azalea growing?
      > I know that the native species Western Azalea, Rhodora Azalea and Swamp
      > azalea grow sometimes in natural bogs. I have seen the Hoary Azalea
      > growing on small islands in a creek at my family's farm in Williamsburg
      > County.
      > But, I am growing a few evergreen azaleas in bog conditions that would
      > seem fatal to the plants. See the attached photos. One is a Chinzan that
      > I rooted by sticking into the edge of a large container bog, an old
      > concrete bird bath top. The second is my Unkever azalea that I rooted by
      > sticking it into a floating plant buoy in our garden pond. Both plants
      > are thriving (and blooming), and now I have the Rhodora azalea growing
      > in two floating pots, no flowers yet.
      > Growing azaleas in such wet conditions solves the water and fertility
      > problems.
      > Mike Creel, SC USDA Zone 8a
      > Nature is my Greenhouse
      > Fall-Line Sandhills region
      > Lexington County, South Carolina
      >
    • Mike Creel
      I have not examined or compared the roots of ,y two bog grown evergreen azaleas with similar azaleas in friable well-drained soil (since that would require
      Message 3 of 3 , Feb 21, 2011
      • 0 Attachment
        I have not examined or compared the roots of ,y two bog grown evergreen azaleas
        with similar azaleas in friable well-drained soil (since that would require
        autopsy), BUT my educated guess is that the bog azaleas have much-reduced roots
        in their above water root zone of an inch or so of growing area.  Also the bog
        grown azaleas, while healthy, seem to be stunted or reduced in plant size.  The
        dwarfing of the plants does not bother me.  I am very interested to see if I can
        establish and grow to bloom the species R. canadense and R. occidentale.  I hope
        most of the attached photos went through.  I reduced all the photos in size but
        a few were around 100 KB.  I just think it is an interesting concept to grow
        azaleas in bog conditions and keep the plants small.
         Mike Creel, SC USDA Zone 8a



        ----- Original Message ----
        From: bsperling <bsperling@...>
        To: azaleas@yahoogroups.com
        Sent: Sun, February 20, 2011 10:22:43 PM
        Subject: Re: [AZ] Azaleas in bogs

        Hi Mike,
              How much air do the roots get compared with evergreens in friable,
        well-drained soil?
            Barry


        Mike Creel wrote:
        >
        > [Attachment(s) <#TopText> from Mike Creel included below]
        >
        > What is the wettest location that you have ever seen an azalea growing?
        > I know that the native species Western Azalea, Rhodora Azalea and Swamp
        > azalea grow sometimes in natural bogs. I have seen the Hoary Azalea
        > growing on small islands in a creek at my family's farm in Williamsburg
        > County.
        > But, I am growing a few evergreen azaleas in bog conditions that would
        > seem fatal to the plants. See the attached photos. One is a Chinzan that
        > I rooted by sticking into the edge of a large container bog, an old
        > concrete bird bath top. The second is my Unkever azalea that I rooted by
        > sticking it into a floating plant buoy in our garden pond. Both plants
        > are thriving (and blooming), and now I have the Rhodora azalea growing
        > in two floating pots, no flowers yet.
        > Growing azaleas in such wet conditions solves the water and fertility
        > problems.
        > Mike Creel, SC USDA Zone 8a
        > Nature is my Greenhouse
        > Fall-Line Sandhills region
        > Lexington County, South Carolina
        >


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