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Azalea decline

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  • Robert Weintraub
    I have many karume azaleas planted when my house was built in 1989; I moved here in 2002. I also have many Indian azaleas planted at the same time. These
    Message 1 of 4 , Jun 30, 2010
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      I have many karume azaleas planted when my house was built in 1989; I moved here in 2002.  I also have many Indian azaleas planted at the same time.  These azaleas have done very well. The Indians are enormous and must be pruned every year.  Most of the karumes also show good growth and require selected pruning.

       

      In recent years some of the karume azaleas have declined in vitality, gradually lost leaves and then were completely dead.  I have replaced six in the past three years (replacing with Gerbing azaleas that are doing well).  I have two older plants that are not doing well now.

       

      What is happening?  I have treated the plants with merit to protect against nematodes, have assured they are watered at least once a week, and fertilize them shortly after the blooms start to fade.  Someone suggested it could be a disease and I have applied a fungicide to all azaleas, but I continue to see decline.

       

      I am in northeast Florida on the coast (adjacent to the Intracoastal Waterway across from Amelia Island ).  Our zone is said to be 8.5 – too cool to be a Florida 9 and too hot and humid to be a Georgia 8.

       

      The severe cold of this past winter had no affect on the azaleas.

       

      Any suggestions?

       

      -r-

       

       

      Robert M. Weintraub

      rweintraub@...

      904 491 6817

       

    • Dan Krabill
      Robert, I learned second-hand from an Azalea Society member in Houston, Texas that kurumes do not do well there. He said they survive for 5 years or so, and
      Message 2 of 4 , Jul 2, 2010
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        Robert,
             I learned second-hand from an Azalea Society member in Houston, Texas that kurumes do not do well there.  He said they survive for 5 years or so, and then the summer heat there is too much for them and they don't make it.  I don't know how your summer weather compares to the hot and humid summers in Houston, or how kurumes do in other parts of the south.
             That experience really surprised me, because kurumes do very well in the Washington, DC area and many points north and south.
                  Dan Krabill
                  McLean, Virginia

        On Wed, Jun 30, 2010 at 12:30 PM, Robert Weintraub <rweintraub@...> wrote:
         

        I have many karume azaleas planted when my house was built in 1989; I moved here in 2002.  I also have many Indian azaleas planted at the same time.  These azaleas have done very well. The Indians are enormous and must be pruned every year.  Most of the karumes also show good growth and require selected pruning.

         

        In recent years some of the karume azaleas have declined in vitality, gradually lost leaves and then were completely dead.  I have replaced six in the past three years (replacing with Gerbing azaleas that are doing well).  I have two older plants that are not doing well now.

         

        What is happening?  I have treated the plants with merit to protect against nematodes, have assured they are watered at least once a week, and fertilize them shortly after the blooms start to fade.  Someone suggested it could be a disease and I have applied a fungicide to all azaleas, but I continue to see decline.

         

        I am in northeast Florida on the coast (adjacent to the Intracoastal Waterway across from Amelia Island).  Our zone is said to be 8.5 – too cool to be a Florida 9 and too hot and humid to be a Georgia 8.

         

        The severe cold of this past winter had no affect on the azaleas.

         

        Any suggestions?

         

        -r-

         

         

        Robert M. Weintraub

        rweintraub@...

        904 491 6817

         


      • bsperling
        Maybe the higher average temperature in Houston, or the duration of the heat? In October the mean temperature in Houston varies from 75° at the beginning of
        Message 3 of 4 , Jul 2, 2010
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          Maybe the higher average temperature in Houston, or the duration of the
          heat? In October the mean temperature in Houston varies from 75° at the
          beginning of the month to 66° at the end. In Washington, DC October
          varies from a mean of 65° to 54°.
          Barry


          Dan Krabill wrote:
          >
          >
          > Robert,
          I don't know how your summer weather compares to
          > the hot and humid summers in Houston, or how kurumes do in other parts
          > of the south.
          > That experience really surprised me, because kurumes do very well
          > in the Washington, DC area and many points north and south.
          > Dan Krabill
          > McLean, Virginia
          >
          > On Wed, Jun 30, 2010 at 12:30 PM, Robert Weintraub
          > <rweintraub@... <mailto:rweintraub@...>> wrote:
          >
          > In recent years some of the karume azaleas have declined in
          > vitality, gradually lost leaves and then were completely dead. I
          > have replaced six in the past three years (replacing with Gerbing
          > azaleas that are doing well). I have two older plants that are not
          > doing well now.
        • Maarten van der Giessen
          I think as time had passed from the days when commercial growers produced azaleas in the field, that we ve forgotten about nematodes. In the good old days the
          Message 4 of 4 , Jul 3, 2010
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            I think as time had passed from the days when commercial growers produced azaleas in the field, that we've forgotten about nematodes. In the good old days the grower would cover the bed with plastic and methyl bromide the heck out of it before planting to eliminate this pest. With the advent of soilless media, crowned beds, and either rock or poly ground cover, nematodes have largely been eliminated from nurseries. However, when you put that pot in the ground, particularly in sandy soils, it's lunch time for the bugs down South . The Kurume is succeptible, while the Indicas are nearly immume. You can minimize nematodes by ammending your soil heavily with organics, and planting under partial shade. Nematodes are grassland parasites, and love the sun and sand.

            Maarten van der Giessen
            Semmes, Alabama

            --- In azaleas@yahoogroups.com, bsperling <bsperling@...> wrote:
            >
            > Maybe the higher average temperature in Houston, or the duration of the
            > heat? In October the mean temperature in Houston varies from 75° at the
            > beginning of the month to 66° at the end. In Washington, DC October
            > varies from a mean of 65° to 54°.
            > Barry
            >
            >
            > Dan Krabill wrote:
            > >
            > >
            > > Robert,
            > I don't know how your summer weather compares to
            > > the hot and humid summers in Houston, or how kurumes do in other parts
            > > of the south.
            > > That experience really surprised me, because kurumes do very well
            > > in the Washington, DC area and many points north and south.
            > > Dan Krabill
            > > McLean, Virginia
            > >
            > > On Wed, Jun 30, 2010 at 12:30 PM, Robert Weintraub
            > > <rweintraub@... <mailto:rweintraub@...>> wrote:
            > >
            > > In recent years some of the karume azaleas have declined in
            > > vitality, gradually lost leaves and then were completely dead. I
            > > have replaced six in the past three years (replacing with Gerbing
            > > azaleas that are doing well). I have two older plants that are not
            > > doing well now.
            >
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