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Re: [AZ] Cutting Grafts in Germany

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  • Ron Rabideau
    Steve, Photos didn t come through. I would very much like to see this. Ron On Mon, 31 May 2010 11:31:09 -0300, Steve Henning ... --
    Message 1 of 3 , May 31, 2010
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      Steve,
      Photos didn't come through. I would very much like to see this.
      Ron

      On Mon, 31 May 2010 11:31:09 -0300, Steve Henning <rhodyman@...>
      wrote:

      >
      > At the recent International Rhododendron Conference in Bremen, Germany,
      > one thing that I found interesting was that there are basically two
      > different methods of raising grafted plants. One method, the more
      > conventional method, has something like Cunningham's White or Inkarho
      > patented rootstocks that are rooted from cuttings and grown for 2 years.
      > Then the scion is grafted on to the root stock using a splice or side
      > graft. The graft is wrapped with a rubber band type material until the
      > graft takes.
      >
      > The second and newer method, cutting grafts, takes cuttings of both the
      > scion and the root stock and grafts them together and roots them at the
      > same time. For about 1.5 to 2 inches each cutting is cut from one side
      > to the center of the base. Then the cut areas of each cutting are mated
      > with green tissue touching green tissue. Then the two cut areas of mated
      > cuttings are wrapped with raw cotton string and dipped in a powdered
      > rooting hormone and stuck in a rooting soil-mix. The raw cotton string
      > will eventually rot in the soil. Schröder showed us how he did
      > grafting and rooting at the same time.
      >
      >
      >
      >
      >
      > Here is a photo of a cutting graft, the new simultaneous graft and
      > rooting, after it rooted and grafted together and the Cunningham White
      > cutting was trimmed back leaving the "scion" at Schröder's.
      >
      >
      >
      > Here is a photo of a conventional splice graft of a scion onto a rooted
      > rootstock at Hachmann's.
      >
      >
      >
      > Here is a photo of conventional side grafts of a scion onto a rooted
      > rootstock at Hachmann's.
      >


      --
      Ron Rabideau
      Camden, NJ
      Zone 6b-7a
    • Steve Henning
      At the recent International Rhododendron Conference in Bremen, Germany, one thing that I found interesting was that there are basically two different methods
      Message 2 of 3 , May 31, 2010
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        At the recent International Rhododendron Conference in Bremen, Germany, one thing that I found interesting was that there are basically two different methods of raising grafted plants. One method, the more conventional method, has something like Cunningham's White or Inkarho patented rootstocks that are rooted from cuttings and grown for 2 years. Then the scion is grafted on to the root stock using a splice or side graft. The graft is wrapped with a rubber band type material until the graft takes.

        The second and newer method, cutting grafts, takes cuttings of both the scion and the root stock and grafts them together and roots them at the same time. For about 1.5 to 2 inches each cutting is cut from one side to the center of the base. Then the cut areas of each cutting are mated with green tissue touching green tissue. Then the two cut areas of mated cuttings are wrapped with raw cotton string and dipped in a powdered rooting hormone and stuck in a rooting soil-mix. The raw cotton string will eventually rot in the soil. Schröder showed us how he did grafting and rooting at the same time.  


         
        Here is a photo of a cutting graft, the new simultaneous graft and rooting, after it rooted and grafted together and the Cunningham White cutting was trimmed back leaving the "scion" at Schröder's.

          
           
        Here is a photo of a conventional splice graft of a scion onto a rooted rootstock at Hachmann's.

          
           
        Here is a photo of conventional side grafts of a scion onto a rooted rootstock at Hachmann's.

      • Ron Rabideau
        Steve, Never mind, when I logged in to Yahoo, they were there. When I look at my downloaded emails, they are not. Go figure. Ron On Mon, 31 May 2010 10:45:21
        Message 3 of 3 , May 31, 2010
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          Steve,
          Never mind, when I logged in to Yahoo, they were there. When I look at my
          downloaded emails, they are not. Go figure.
          Ron


          On Mon, 31 May 2010 10:45:21 -0300, Ron Rabideau <rhodyrex@...>
          wrote:

          > Steve,
          > Photos didn't come through. I would very much like to see this.
          > Ron
          >
          > On Mon, 31 May 2010 11:31:09 -0300, Steve Henning
          > <rhodyman@...>
          > wrote:
          >
          >>
          >> At the recent International Rhododendron Conference in Bremen, Germany,
          >> one thing that I found interesting was that there are basically two
          >> different methods of raising grafted plants. One method, the more
          >> conventional method, has something like Cunningham's White or Inkarho
          >> patented rootstocks that are rooted from cuttings and grown for 2 years.
          >> Then the scion is grafted on to the root stock using a splice or side
          >> graft. The graft is wrapped with a rubber band type material until the
          >> graft takes.
          >>
          >> The second and newer method, cutting grafts, takes cuttings of both the
          >> scion and the root stock and grafts them together and roots them at the
          >> same time. For about 1.5 to 2 inches each cutting is cut from one side
          >> to the center of the base. Then the cut areas of each cutting are mated
          >> with green tissue touching green tissue. Then the two cut areas of mated
          >> cuttings are wrapped with raw cotton string and dipped in a powdered
          >> rooting hormone and stuck in a rooting soil-mix. The raw cotton string
          >> will eventually rot in the soil. Schröder showed us how he did
          >> grafting and rooting at the same time.
          >>
          >>
          >>
          >>
          >>
          >> Here is a photo of a cutting graft, the new simultaneous graft and
          >> rooting, after it rooted and grafted together and the Cunningham White
          >> cutting was trimmed back leaving the "scion" at Schröder's.
          >>
          >>
          >>
          >> Here is a photo of a conventional splice graft of a scion onto a rooted
          >> rootstock at Hachmann's.
          >>
          >>
          >>
          >> Here is a photo of conventional side grafts of a scion onto a rooted
          >> rootstock at Hachmann's.
          >>
          >
          >


          --
          Ron Rabideau
          Camden, NJ
          Zone 6b-7a
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