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RE: [rhodo] Re: North America, States and Provinces without native rhododendron species

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  • Harold Greer
    Thanks everyone for the research and comments. Let us leave Hawaii out of the states, since it is not on the continent of North America. So the states without
    Message 1 of 9 , May 30, 2010

      Thanks everyone for the research and comments.

       

      Let us leave Hawaii out of the states, since it is not on the continent of North America .

       

      So the states without easily known rhododendrons are:

      North Dakota

      South Dakota

      Nebraska

      Arizona

      New Mexico

       

      If I missed a comment that proves there are rhododendrons native in these states let me hear.  That means that only five states out of 49 do not have native rhododendrons.  And you commonly hear that rhododendrons do not grow in much of North America .  Of course that does not prove that for this reason rhododendrons are easy to grow in every part of North America .  I am also not convinced that R. occidentale does not cross the border into Mexico , but I certainly can’t prove it does, and it may not.  That would be a wonderful area to explore if you can dodge the drug trafficers!  Though I am sure you could find some species there, Canabis that is!

       

      I thought that the website http://plants.usda.gov/java/profile?symbol=RHODO was very poorly informed and they mention many rhododendrons that are not even native to North America such as R. brachycarpum and R. molle.  Yes, they are rhododendron species, but they don’t seem to match the purpose of that site.  Another example of government efficiency and competence or I should say incompetence!  And some want to add to the scope of our government.  Sorry, I don’t want to make this political, but I could not resist making that statement.  Excuse me; I will try to be better behaved in the future.

       

      It is my hope to do an article on North American Rhododendron species and probably a DVD with pictures of their habitat and flowers.  I don’t think any one has done a comprehensive article and study on that subject.

       

      Again thank you for all of your comments and knowledge.  I really appreciate the knowledge that is so freely shared on both the rhododendron and azalea groups.  None of us are always correct, but we share knowledge and experience.  I try to answer as many questions as I can, using my 50,000 picture collection to help illustrate my points.  I am always happy to share pictures with anyone who asks.

       

      Harold Greer

       

       

       


      From: rhodo@yahoogroups.com [mailto: rhodo@yahoogroups.com ] On Behalf Of sjperk5
      Sent: Sunday, May 30, 2010 1:52 PM
      To: rhodo@yahoogroups.com
      Subject: [rhodo] Re: North America , States and Provinces without native rhododendron species

       

       

      Ledum grows in Utah

      --- In rhodo@yahoogroups.com, " Harold Greer " <hgreer@...> wrote:

      >
      >
      >
      >
      >
      >
      >
      > I am going to ask what states in the U.S.
      and provinces in Canada do not
      > have at least one native Rhododendron species. I have not done any
      > research on this which I could do, but I thought it might make a good
      > topic for thought in our group. I am not saying I am right in this, I
      > just want feed back. In time I hope to do a program on North American
      > Rhododendrons. Remember that the Genus Ledum is now included in the
      > Genus Rhododendron.
      >
      >
      >
      > At first glace many of you are going to say most states don't have a
      > rhododendron species. But that is not true. I am going to list the
      > states that first come to mind as having no rhododendron species. I ask
      > the many superior minds on both the Azalea and Rhododendrons groups to
      > comment. I am going to list the following as the only states that do
      > not have a native rhododendron species:
      >
      > North Dakota
      >
      > South Dakota
      >
      > Nebraska
      >
      > Iowa
      >
      > Illinois
      >
      > Kansas
      >
      > Missouri
      >
      > Utah
      >
      > Arizona
      >
      > New Mexico
      >
      > Hawaii
      >
      >
      >
      > I think all of Canada
      has native rhododendrons at least in the north
      > part or each province. Mexico
      may have R. occidentale in Baja
      > California ,
      but I have not seen that fact proven, though R. occidentale
      > we know grows close to the Mexican border.
      >
      >
      >
      > That is only 11 states out of 50, and
      w:st="on">Hawaii is not part of the
      > mainland. Oklahoma and
      w:st="on">Arkansas I question, but I think some of those
      > plants we call azaleas may grow there.
      >
      >
      >
      > How many of you are reading this and saying, "He's crazy, now we know
      > Harold Greer can't be
      believed". But let's check it out. I know much
      > of the information can be found with searches on the internet. So let's
      > check it out as I said. I am not saying I am 100% correct. This should
      > provide some interesting information that may not easily be found.
      >
      >
      >
      > Harold Greer
      >

    • Steve Henning
      Hi Harold, I goofed in a previous post and left out some of the states with Ledum. According to the USDA (http://plants.usda.gov/), Michigan, Minnesota,
      Message 2 of 9 , May 30, 2010
        Hi Harold,

        I goofed in a previous post and left out some of the states with Ledum. According to the USDA (http://plants.usda.gov/), Michigan, Minnesota, Nevada, North Dakota, South Dakota, Utah and Wyomining have only Ledum (R. groenlandicum, R. neoglandulosum or R. subarticum).

        So that leaves Arizona, Indiana, Iowa, Kansas, Nebraska, and New Mexico as not having native stands of rhododendrons.

        So 6 states in the continental US do not have native stands of rhododendrons.

        Steve Henning

        --- In azaleas@yahoogroups.com, "Harold Greer" <hgreer@...> wrote:
        >
        > Thanks everyone for the research and comments.
        >
        >
        >
        > Let us leave Hawaii out of the states, since it is not on the continent
        > of North America.
        >
        >
        >
        > So the states without easily known rhododendrons are:
        >
        > North Dakota
        >
        > South Dakota
        >
        > Nebraska
        >
        > Arizona
        >
        > New Mexico
        >
        >
        >
        > If I missed a comment that proves there are rhododendrons native in
        > these states let me hear. That means that only five states out of 49 do
        > not have native rhododendrons. And you commonly hear that rhododendrons
        > do not grow in much of North America. Of course that does not prove
        > that for this reason rhododendrons are easy to grow in every part of
        > North America. I am also not convinced that R. occidentale does not
        > cross the border into Mexico, but I certainly can't prove it does, and
        > it may not. That would be a wonderful area to explore if you can dodge
        > the drug trafficers! Though I am sure you could find some species
        > there, Canabis that is!
        >
        >
        >
        > I thought that the website
        > http://plants.usda.gov/java/profile?symbol=RHODO was very poorly
        > informed and they mention many rhododendrons that are not even native to
        > North America such as R. brachycarpum and R. molle. Yes, they are
        > rhododendron species, but they don't seem to match the purpose of that
        > site. Another example of government efficiency and competence or I
        > should say incompetence! And some want to add to the scope of our
        > government. Sorry, I don't want to make this political, but I could not
        > resist making that statement. Excuse me; I will try to be better
        > behaved in the future.
        >
        >
        >
        > It is my hope to do an article on North American Rhododendron species
        > and probably a DVD with pictures of their habitat and flowers. I don't
        > think any one has done a comprehensive article and study on that
        > subject.
        >
        >
        >
        > Again thank you for all of your comments and knowledge. I really
        > appreciate the knowledge that is so freely shared on both the
        > rhododendron and azalea groups. None of us are always correct, but we
        > share knowledge and experience. I try to answer as many questions as I
        > can, using my 50,000 picture collection to help illustrate my points. I
        > am always happy to share pictures with anyone who asks.
        >
        >
        >
        > Harold Greer
        >
        >
        >
        >
        >
        >
        >
        > ________________________________
        >
        > From: rhodo@yahoogroups.com [mailto:rhodo@yahoogroups.com] On Behalf Of
        > sjperk5
        > Sent: Sunday, May 30, 2010 1:52 PM
        > To: rhodo@yahoogroups.com
        > Subject: [rhodo] Re: North America, States and Provinces without native
        > rhododendron species
        >
        >
        >
        >
        >
        > Ledum grows in Utah
        >
        > --- In rhodo@yahoogroups.com <mailto:rhodo%40yahoogroups.com> , "Harold
        > Greer" <hgreer@> wrote:
        > >
        > >
        > >
        > >
        > >
        > >
        > >
        > > I am going to ask what states in the U.S. and provinces in Canada do
        > not
        > > have at least one native Rhododendron species. I have not done any
        > > research on this which I could do, but I thought it might make a good
        > > topic for thought in our group. I am not saying I am right in this, I
        > > just want feed back. In time I hope to do a program on North American
        > > Rhododendrons. Remember that the Genus Ledum is now included in the
        > > Genus Rhododendron.
        > >
        > >
        > >
        > > At first glace many of you are going to say most states don't have a
        > > rhododendron species. But that is not true. I am going to list the
        > > states that first come to mind as having no rhododendron species. I
        > ask
        > > the many superior minds on both the Azalea and Rhododendrons groups to
        > > comment. I am going to list the following as the only states that do
        > > not have a native rhododendron species:
        > >
        > > North Dakota
        > >
        > > South Dakota
        > >
        > > Nebraska
        > >
        > > Iowa
        > >
        > > Illinois
        > >
        > > Kansas
        > >
        > > Missouri
        > >
        > > Utah
        > >
        > > Arizona
        > >
        > > New Mexico
        > >
        > > Hawaii
        > >
        > >
        > >
        > > I think all of Canada has native rhododendrons at least in the north
        > > part or each province. Mexico may have R. occidentale in Baja
        > > California, but I have not seen that fact proven, though R.
        > occidentale
        > > we know grows close to the Mexican border.
        > >
        > >
        > >
        > > That is only 11 states out of 50, and Hawaii is not part of the
        > > mainland. Oklahoma and Arkansas I question, but I think some of those
        > > plants we call azaleas may grow there.
        > >
        > >
        > >
        > > How many of you are reading this and saying, "He's crazy, now we know
        > > Harold Greer can't be believed". But let's check it out. I know much
        > > of the information can be found with searches on the internet. So
        > let's
        > > check it out as I said. I am not saying I am 100% correct. This should
        > > provide some interesting information that may not easily be found.
        > >
        > >
        > >
        > > Harold Greer
        > >
        >
      • Harold Greer
        Hi Steve, I though we already had information that Indiana and Iowa and maybe Kansas had rhododendrons. So now we are down to Arizona, New Mexico and Nebraska.
        Message 3 of 9 , May 30, 2010

          Hi Steve,

           

          I though we already had information that Indiana and Iowa and maybe Kansas had rhododendrons.

           

          So now we are down to Arizona , New Mexico and Nebraska .

           

          I am going back a print all the posts on this subject, so that I did not miss something.

           

          On anther point, yes, there is lots of “mining” in Wyomining, so I guess they have changed the spelling of the name of the state according to you!  Just had to kid you a little about that spelling!  Things change every day, so it is hard to keep up!

           

          Harold

           

           

           


          From: azaleas@yahoogroups.com [mailto: azaleas@yahoogroups.com ] On Behalf Of Steve Henning
          Sent: Sunday, May 30, 2010 9:21 PM
          To: azaleas@yahoogroups.com
          Subject: [AZ] [rhodo] Re: North America , States and Provinces without native rhododendron spec

           

           



          Hi Harold,

          I goofed in a previous post and left out some of the states with Ledum. According to the USDA (http://plants.usda.gov/), Michigan , Minnesota , Nevada , North Dakota , South Dakota , Utah and Wyomining have only Ledum (R. groenlandicum, R. neoglandulosum or R. subarticum).

          So that leaves Arizona , Indiana , Iowa , Kansas , Nebraska , and New Mexico as not having native stands of rhododendrons.

          So 6 states in the continental US do not have native stands of rhododendrons.

          Steve Henning

          --- In azaleas@yahoogroups.com, " Harold Greer " <hgreer@...> wrote:

          >
          > Thanks everyone for the research and comments.
          >
          >
          >
          > Let us leave Hawaii
          out of the states, since it is not on the continent
          > of North America .
          >
          >
          >
          > So the states without easily known rhododendrons are:
          >
          > North Dakota
          >
          > South Dakota
          >
          > Nebraska
          >
          > Arizona
          >
          > New Mexico
          >
          >
          >
          > If I missed a comment that proves there are rhododendrons native in
          > these states let me hear. That means that only five states out of 49 do
          > not have native rhododendrons. And you commonly hear that rhododendrons
          > do not grow in much of North America . Of
          course that does not prove
          > that for this reason rhododendrons are easy to grow in every part of
          > North America . I am also not convinced
          that R. occidentale does not
          > cross the border into Mexico ,
          but I certainly can't prove it does, and
          > it may not. That would be a wonderful area to explore if you can dodge
          > the drug trafficers! Though I am sure you could find some species
          > there, Canabis that is!
          >
          >
          >
          > I thought that the website
          > http://plants.usda.gov/java/profile?symbol=RHODO
          was very poorly
          > informed and they mention many rhododendrons that are not even native to
          > North America such as R. brachycarpum and
          R. molle. Yes, they are
          > rhododendron species, but they don't seem to match the purpose of that
          > site. Another example of government efficiency and competence or I
          > should say incompetence! And some want to add to the scope of our
          > government. Sorry, I don't want to make this political, but I could not
          > resist making that statement. Excuse me; I will try to be better
          > behaved in the future.
          >
          >
          >
          > It is my hope to do an article on North American Rhododendron species
          > and probably a DVD with pictures of their habitat and flowers. I don't
          > think any one has done a comprehensive article and study on that
          > subject.
          >
          >
          >
          > Again thank you for all of your comments and knowledge. I really
          > appreciate the knowledge that is so freely shared on both the
          > rhododendron and azalea groups. None of us are always correct, but we
          > share knowledge and experience. I try to answer as many questions as I
          > can, using my 50,000 picture collection to help illustrate my points. I
          > am always happy to share pictures with anyone who asks.
          >
          >
          >
          > Harold Greer
          >
          >
          >
          >
          >
          >
          >
          > ________________________________
          >
          > From: rhodo@yahoogroups.com
          [mailto:rhodo@yahoogroups.com] On Behalf Of
          > sjperk5
          > Sent: Sunday, May 30, 2010 1:52 PM
          > To: rhodo@yahoogroups.com
          > Subject: [rhodo] Re: North America ,
          States and Provinces without native
          > rhododendron species
          >
          >
          >
          >
          >
          > Ledum grows in Utah
          >
          > --- In rhodo@yahoogroups.com
          <mailto:rhodo%40yahoogroups.com> , "Harold
          > Greer" <hgreer@> wrote:
          > >
          > >
          > >
          > >
          > >
          > >
          > >
          > > I am going to ask what states in the U.S.
          and provinces in Canada do
          > not
          > > have at least one native Rhododendron species. I have not done any
          > > research on this which I could do, but I thought it might make a good
          > > topic for thought in our group. I am not saying I am right in this, I
          > > just want feed back. In time I hope to do a program on North American
          > > Rhododendrons. Remember that the Genus Ledum is now included in the
          > > Genus Rhododendron.
          > >
          > >
          > >
          > > At first glace many of you are going to say most states don't have a
          > > rhododendron species. But that is not true. I am going to list the
          > > states that first come to mind as having no rhododendron species. I
          > ask
          > > the many superior minds on both the Azalea and Rhododendrons groups
          to
          > > comment. I am going to list the following as the only states that do
          > > not have a native rhododendron species:
          > >
          > > North Dakota
          > >
          > > South Dakota
          > >
          > > Nebraska
          > >
          > > Iowa
          > >
          > > Illinois
          > >
          > > Kansas
          > >
          > > Missouri
          > >
          > > Utah
          > >
          > > Arizona
          > >
          > > New Mexico
          > >
          > > Hawaii
          > >
          > >
          > >
          > > I think all of Canada
          has native rhododendrons at least in the north
          > > part or each province.
          w:st="on">Mexico may have R. occidentale in Baja
          > > California ,
          but I have not seen that fact proven, though R.
          > occidentale
          > > we know grows close to the Mexican border.
          > >
          > >
          > >
          > > That is only 11 states out of 50, and
          w:st="on">Hawaii is not part of the
          > > mainland. Oklahoma and
          w:st="on"> Arkansas I question, but I think some of those
          > > plants we call azaleas may grow there.
          > >
          > >
          > >
          > > How many of you are reading this and saying, "He's crazy, now we
          know
          > > Harold Greer can't be
          believed". But let's check it out. I know much
          > > of the information can be found with searches on the internet. So
          > let's
          > > check it out as I said. I am not saying I am 100% correct. This
          should
          > > provide some interesting information that may not easily be found.
          > >
          > >
          > >
          > > Harold Greer
          > >
          >

        • William C. Miller III
          Harold, What have you found native in Nevada? Last fall, I had an occasion to visit the high desert, west of Lost Wages. It was a remarkably bleak and barren
          Message 4 of 9 , May 30, 2010
            Harold,

            What have you found native in Nevada?  Last fall, I had an occasion to visit the high desert, west of Lost Wages.  It was a remarkably bleak and barren landscape.  The predominant plants looked like tumble weed and a very stressed out cactus.  The humidity was extremely low, although there was evidence of "gully-washers."  Apparently, what rainfall they get comes almost all at once.  If what I saw was representative of the entire state, I can't imagine rhododendrons surviving the temperatures and lack of humidity.  Perhaps there are moderate environmental pockets to the west that would permit occidentale to sneak across from the CA border.  Kron only mentions CA and Oregon for occidentale.

            Bill

            Harold Greer wrote:
             

            Thanks everyone for the research and comments.

             

            Let us leave Hawaii out of the states, since it is not on the continent of North America .

             

            So the states without easily known rhododendrons are:

            North Dakota

            South Dakota

            Nebraska

            Arizona

            New Mexico

             

            If I missed a comment that proves there are rhododendrons native in these states let me hear.  That means that only five states out of 49 do not have native rhododendrons.  And you commonly hear that rhododendrons do not grow in much of North America .  Of course that does not prove that for this reason rhododendrons are easy to grow in every part of North America .  I am also not convinced that R. occidentale does not cross the border into Mexico , but I certainly can’t prove it does, and it may not.  That would be a wonderful area to explore if you can dodge the drug trafficers!  Though I am sure you could find some species there, Canabis that is!

             

            I thought that the website http://plants. usda.gov/ java/profile? symbol=RHODO was very poorly informed and they mention many rhododendrons that are not even native to North America such as R. brachycarpum and R. molle.  Yes, they are rhododendron species, but they don’t seem to match the purpose of that site.  Another example of government efficiency and competence or I should say incompetence!  And some want to add to the scope of our government.  Sorry, I don’t want to make this political, but I could not resist making that statement.  Excuse me; I will try to be better behaved in the future.

             

            It is my hope to do an article on North American Rhododendron species and probably a DVD with pictures of their habitat and flowers.  I don’t think any one has done a comprehensive article and study on that subject.

             

            Again thank you for all of your comments and knowledge.  I really appreciate the knowledge that is so freely shared on both the rhododendron and azalea groups.  None of us are always correct, but we share knowledge and experience.  I try to answer as many questions as I can, using my 50,000 picture collection to help illustrate my points.  I am always happy to share pictures with anyone who asks.

             

            Harold Greer

             

             

             


            From: rhodo@yahoogroups. com [mailto: rhodo@yahoogroups. com ] On Behalf Of sjperk5
            Sent: Sunday, May 30, 2010 1:52 PM
            To: rhodo@yahoogroups. com
            Subject: [rhodo] Re: North America , States and Provinces without native rhododendron species

             

             

            Ledum grows in Utah

            --- In rhodo@yahoogroups. com, " Harold Greer " <hgreer@...> wrote:
            >
            >
            >
            >
            >
            >
            >
            > I am going to ask what states in the U.S. and provinces in Canada do not
            > have at least one native Rhododendron species. I have not done any
            > research on this which I could do, but I thought it might make a good
            > topic for thought in our group. I am not saying I am right in this, I
            > just want feed back. In time I hope to do a program on North American
            > Rhododendrons. Remember that the Genus Ledum is now included in the
            > Genus Rhododendron.
            >
            >
            >
            > At first glace many of you are going to say most states don't have a
            > rhododendron species. But that is not true. I am going to list the
            > states that first come to mind as having no rhododendron species. I ask
            > the many superior minds on both the Azalea and Rhododendrons groups to
            > comment. I am going to list the following as the only states that do
            > not have a native rhododendron species:
            >
            > North Dakota
            >
            > South Dakota
            >
            > Nebraska
            >
            > Iowa
            >
            > Illinois
            >
            > Kansas
            >
            > Missouri
            >
            > Utah
            >
            > Arizona
            >
            > New Mexico
            >
            > Hawaii
            >
            >
            >
            > I think all of Canada has native rhododendrons at least in the north
            > part or each province. Mexico may have R. occidentale in Baja
            > California , but I have not seen that fact proven, though R. occidentale
            > we know grows close to the Mexican border.
            >
            >
            >
            > That is only 11 states out of 50, and Hawaii is not part of the
            > mainland. Oklahoma and Arkansas I question, but I think some of those
            > plants we call azaleas may grow there.
            >
            >
            >
            > How many of you are reading this and saying, "He's crazy, now we know
            > Harold Greer can't be believed". But let's check it out. I know much
            > of the information can be found with searches on the internet. So let's
            > check it out as I said. I am not saying I am 100% correct. This should
            > provide some interesting information that may not easily be found.
            >
            >
            >
            > Harold Greer
            >

          • Harold Greer
            Bill, I don t think R. occidentale grows in Nevada, but probably a Ledum (now Rhododendron) does. Nevada is a harsh climate but there are areas where Ledum
            Message 5 of 9 , May 30, 2010

              Bill,

               

              I don’t think R. occidentale grows in Nevada , but probably a Ledum (now Rhododendron) does.  Nevada is a harsh climate but there are areas where Ledum could grow.

               

              I would like to do more travelling in Nevada .  On a Nevada subject, my father who would be 115 now if he were alive had an uncle on his mother’s side (Uncle Theodore), who farmed a large piece of land in central Nevada .  He raised fruit and the only way to ship his fruit out was by parcel post.  I know my father visited there, and there was only one road in or out.  Uncle Theodore was the Mayor, Sheriff and Postmaster of the community.  It seems the name of the community was Sharp or Sharps, Nevada , not Sparks which is near Reno .  A search of Google gives no results for Sharp, Nevada .  I don’t doubt what my father told me, as he was accurate in his details, but where this place was I don’t know.  I do know that Uncle Theodore suddenly disappeared and was never heard from again, though there was some communication with his son during my lifetime.  Mysteries never cease!  I don’t think this story is wrong, though some details may be.  I would love to know the whole truth.

               

              Well, now back to our subject of rhododendrons!

               

              Harold

               


              From: azaleas@yahoogroups.com [mailto: azaleas@yahoogroups.com ] On Behalf Of William C. Miller III
              Sent: Sunday, May 30, 2010 9:41 PM
              To: azaleas@yahoogroups.com
              Subject: Re: [AZ] RE: [rhodo] Re: North America , States and Provinces without native rhododendron species

               

               

              Harold,

              What have you found native in Nevada ?  Last fall, I had an occasion to visit the high desert, west of Lost Wages.  It was a remarkably bleak and barren landscape.  The predominant plants looked like tumble weed and a very stressed out cactus.  The humidity was extremely low, although there was evidence of "gully-washers. "  Apparently, what rainfall they get comes almost all at once.  If what I saw was representative of the entire state, I can't imagine rhododendrons surviving the temperatures and lack of humidity.  Perhaps there are moderate environmental pockets to the west that would permit occidentale to sneak across from the CA border.  Kron only mentions CA and Oregon for occidentale.

              Bill

              Harold Greer wrote:

               

              Thanks everyone for the research and comments.

               

              Let us leave Hawaii out of the states, since it is not on the continent of North America .

               

              So the states without easily known rhododendrons are:

              North Dakota

              South Dakota

              Nebraska

              Arizona

              New Mexico

               

              If I missed a comment that proves there are rhododendrons native in these states let me hear.  That means that only five states out of 49 do not have native rhododendrons.  And you commonly hear that rhododendrons do not grow in much of North America .  Of course that does not prove that for this reason rhododendrons are easy to grow in every part of North America .  I am also not convinced that R. occidentale does not cross the border into Mexico , but I certainly can’t prove it does, and it may not.  That would be a wonderful area to explore if you can dodge the drug trafficers!  Though I am sure you could find some species there, Canabis that is!

               

              I thought that the website http://plants. usda.gov/ java/profile? symbol=RHODO was very poorly informed and they mention many rhododendrons that are not even native to North America such as R. brachycarpum and R. molle.  Yes, they are rhododendron species, but they don’t seem to match the purpose of that site.  Another example of government efficiency and competence or I should say incompetence!  And some want to add to the scope of our government.  Sorry, I don’t want to make this political, but I could not resist making that statement.  Excuse me; I will try to be better behaved in the future.

               

              It is my hope to do an article on North American Rhododendron species and probably a DVD with pictures of their habitat and flowers.  I don’t think any one has done a comprehensive article and study on that subject.

               

              Again thank you for all of your comments and knowledge.  I really appreciate the knowledge that is so freely shared on both the rhododendron and azalea groups.  None of us are always correct, but we share knowledge and experience.  I try to answer as many questions as I can, using my 50,000 picture collection to help illustrate my points.  I am always happy to share pictures with anyone who asks.

               

              Harold Greer

               

               

               


              From: rhodo@yahoogroups. com [mailto: rhodo@yahoogroups. com ] On Behalf Of sjperk5
              Sent: Sunday, May 30, 2010 1:52 PM
              To: rhodo@yahoogroups. com
              Subject: [rhodo] Re: North America , States and Provinces without native rhododendron species

               

               

              Ledum grows in Utah

              --- In rhodo@yahoogroups. com, " Harold Greer " <hgreer@...> wrote:
              >
              >
              >
              >
              >
              >
              >
              > I am going to ask what states in the U.S. and provinces in Canada do not
              > have at least one native Rhododendron species. I have not done any
              > research on this which I could do, but I thought it might make a good
              > topic for thought in our group. I am not saying I am right in this, I
              > just want feed back. In time I hope to do a program on North American
              > Rhododendrons. Remember that the Genus Ledum is now included in the
              > Genus Rhododendron.
              >
              >
              >
              > At first glace many of you are going to say most states don't have a
              > rhododendron species. But that is not true. I am going to list the
              > states that first come to mind as having no rhododendron species. I ask
              > the many superior minds on both the Azalea and Rhododendrons groups to
              > comment. I am going to list the following as the only states that do
              > not have a native rhododendron species:
              >
              > North Dakota
              >
              > South Dakota
              >
              > Nebraska
              >
              > Iowa
              >
              > Illinois
              >
              > Kansas
              >
              > Missouri
              >
              > Utah
              >
              > Arizona
              >
              > New Mexico
              >
              > Hawaii
              >
              >
              >
              > I think all of Canada has native rhododendrons at least in the north
              > part or each province. Mexico may have R. occidentale in Baja
              > California , but I have not seen that fact proven, though R. occidentale
              > we know grows close to the Mexican border.
              >
              >
              >
              > That is only 11 states out of 50, and Hawaii is not part of the
              > mainland. Oklahoma and Arkansas I question, but I think some of those
              > plants we call azaleas may grow there.
              >
              >
              >
              > How many of you are reading this and saying, "He's crazy, now we know
              > Harold Greer can't be believed". But let's check it out. I know much
              > of the information can be found with searches on the internet. So let's
              > check it out as I said. I am not saying I am 100% correct. This should
              > provide some interesting information that may not easily be found.
              >
              >
              >
              > Harold Greer
              >

            • Harold Greer
              I do know one other thing I did not mention about the Nevada subject when I looked at the map. The location of Sharps was south of Tonopah which would
              Message 6 of 9 , May 30, 2010

                I do know one other thing I did not mention about the Nevada subject when I looked at the map.  The location of “Sharps” was south of Tonopah which would probably now be in the Tonapah Test Range , which might explain some things.  If you believe in any conspiracy theories, that might explain why Uncle Theodore suddenly disappeared!  I know it was said that he did not want to leave his land, but might have been forced to.  Again, this is all conjecture and I have no intention of worrying about what happened to Uncle Theodore, though I do think history is interesting.  We all need to learn from history.

                 

                Harold Greer

                 


                From: azaleas@yahoogroups.com [mailto: azaleas@yahoogroups.com ] On Behalf Of Harold Greer
                Sent: Sunday, May 30, 2010 10:31 PM
                To: azaleas@yahoogroups.com
                Subject: RE: [AZ] RE: [rhodo] Re: North America , States and Provinces without native rhododendron species

                 

                 

                Bill,

                 

                I don’t think R. occidentale grows in Nevada , but probably a Ledum (now Rhododendron) does.  Nevada is a harsh climate but there are areas where Ledum could grow.

                 

                I would like to do more travelling in Nevada .  On a Nevada subject, my father who would be 115 now if he were alive had an uncle on his mother’s side (Uncle Theodore), who farmed a large piece of land in central Nevada .  He raised fruit and the only way to ship his fruit out was by parcel post.  I know my father visited there, and there was only one road in or out.  Uncle Theodore was the Mayor, Sheriff and Postmaster of the community.  It seems the name of the community was Sharp or Sharps, Nevada , not Sparks which is near Reno .  A search of Google gives no results for Sharp, Nevada .  I don’t doubt what my father told me, as he was accurate in his details, but where this place was I don’t know.  I do know that Uncle Theodore suddenly disappeared and was never heard from again, though there was some communication with his son during my lifetime.  Mysteries never cease!  I don’t think this story is wrong, though some details may be.  I would love to know the whole truth.

                 

                Well, now back to our subject of rhododendrons!

                 

                Harold

                 


                From: azaleas@yahoogroups .com [mailto: azaleas@yahoogroups .com ] On Behalf Of William C. Miller III
                Sent: Sunday, May 30, 2010 9:41 PM
                To: azaleas@yahoogroups .com
                Subject: Re: [AZ] RE: [rhodo] Re: North America , States and Provinces without native rhododendron species

                 

                 

                Harold,

                What have you found native in Nevada ?  Last fall, I had an occasion to visit the high desert, west of Lost Wages.  It was a remarkably bleak and barren landscape.  The predominant plants looked like tumble weed and a very stressed out cactus.  The humidity was extremely low, although there was evidence of "gully-washers. "  Apparently, what rainfall they get comes almost all at once.  If what I saw was representative of the entire state, I can't imagine rhododendrons surviving the temperatures and lack of humidity.  Perhaps there are moderate environmental pockets to the west that would permit occidentale to sneak across from the CA border.  Kron only mentions CA and Oregon for occidentale.

                Bill

                Harold Greer wrote:

                 

                Thanks everyone for the research and comments.

                 

                Let us leave Hawaii out of the states, since it is not on the continent of North America .

                 

                So the states without easily known rhododendrons are:

                North Dakota

                South Dakota

                Nebraska

                Arizona

                New Mexico

                 

                If I missed a comment that proves there are rhododendrons native in these states let me hear.  That means that only five states out of 49 do not have native rhododendrons.  And you commonly hear that rhododendrons do not grow in much of North America .  Of course that does not prove that for this reason rhododendrons are easy to grow in every part of North America .  I am also not convinced that R. occidentale does not cross the border into Mexico , but I certainly can’t prove it does, and it may not.  That would be a wonderful area to explore if you can dodge the drug trafficers!  Though I am sure you could find some species there, Canabis that is!

                 

                I thought that the website http://plants. usda.gov/ java/profile? symbol=RHODO was very poorly informed and they mention many rhododendrons that are not even native to North America such as R. brachycarpum and R. molle.  Yes, they are rhododendron species, but they don’t seem to match the purpose of that site.  Another example of government efficiency and competence or I should say incompetence!  And some want to add to the scope of our government.  Sorry, I don’t want to make this political, but I could not resist making that statement.  Excuse me; I will try to be better behaved in the future.

                 

                It is my hope to do an article on North American Rhododendron species and probably a DVD with pictures of their habitat and flowers.  I don’t think any one has done a comprehensive article and study on that subject.

                 

                Again thank you for all of your comments and knowledge.  I really appreciate the knowledge that is so freely shared on both the rhododendron and azalea groups.  None of us are always correct, but we share knowledge and experience.  I try to answer as many questions as I can, using my 50,000 picture collection to help illustrate my points.  I am always happy to share pictures with anyone who asks.

                 

                Harold Greer

                 

                 

                 


                From: rhodo@yahoogroups. com [mailto: rhodo@yahoogroups. com ] On Behalf Of sjperk5
                Sent: Sunday, May 30, 2010 1:52 PM
                To: rhodo@yahoogroups. com
                Subject: [rhodo] Re: North America , States and Provinces without native rhododendron species

                 

                 

                Ledum grows in Utah

                --- In rhodo@yahoogroups. com, " Harold Greer " <hgreer@...> wrote:
                >
                >
                >
                >
                >
                >
                >
                > I am going to ask what states in the U.S. and provinces in Canada do not
                > have at least one native Rhododendron species. I have not done any
                > research on this which I could do, but I thought it might make a good
                > topic for thought in our group. I am not saying I am right in this, I
                > just want feed back. In time I hope to do a program on North American
                > Rhododendrons. Remember that the Genus Ledum is now included in the
                > Genus Rhododendron.
                >
                >
                >
                > At first glace many of you are going to say most states don't have a
                > rhododendron species. But that is not true. I am going to list the
                > states that first come to mind as having no rhododendron species. I ask
                > the many superior minds on both the Azalea and Rhododendrons groups to
                > comment. I am going to list the following as the only states that do
                > not have a native rhododendron species:
                >
                > North Dakota
                >
                > South Dakota
                >
                > Nebraska
                >
                > Iowa
                >
                > Illinois
                >
                > Kansas
                >
                > Missouri
                >
                > Utah
                >
                > Arizona
                >
                > New Mexico
                >
                > Hawaii
                >
                >
                >
                > I think all of Canada has native rhododendrons at least in the north
                > part or each province. Mexico may have R. occidentale in Baja
                > California , but I have not seen that fact proven, though R. occidentale
                > we know grows close to the Mexican border.
                >
                >
                >
                > That is only 11 states out of 50, and Hawaii is not part of the
                > mainland. Oklahoma and Arkansas I question, but I think some of those
                > plants we call azaleas may grow there.
                >
                >
                >
                > How many of you are reading this and saying, "He's crazy, now we know
                > Harold Greer can't be believed". But let's check it out. I know much
                > of the information can be found with searches on the internet. So let's
                > check it out as I said. I am not saying I am 100% correct. This should
                > provide some interesting information that may not easily be found.
                >
                >
                >
                > Harold Greer
                >

              • Steve Henning
                Hi Harold, The Azalea bald in Indiana was planted last year. Andy wrote The plants (selected seedlings) were planted out a year ago and so this is their
                Message 7 of 9 , May 31, 2010
                  Hi Harold,

                  The Azalea bald in Indiana was planted last year. Andy wrote "The plants (selected seedlings) were planted out a year ago and so this is their first show ..."

                  John Perkins never said he saw a rhododendron in Indiana, just muck and clay. He thinks the 4H people told him prinophyllum was native but doesn't know if it was true.

                  I can't find where you got Iowa and Kansas. They aren't in the Widrelchner, Dragula, Larson article.

                  Steve Henning

                  --- In azaleas@yahoogroups.com, "Harold Greer" <hgreer@...> wrote:
                  >
                  > Hi Steve,
                  >
                  >
                  >
                  > I though we already had information that Indiana and Iowa and maybe
                  > Kansas had rhododendrons.
                  >
                  >
                  >
                  > So now we are down to Arizona, New Mexico and Nebraska.
                  >
                  >
                  >
                  > I am going back a print all the posts on this subject, so that I did not
                  > miss something.
                  >
                  >
                  >
                  > On anther point, yes, there is lots of "mining" in Wyomining, so I guess
                  > they have changed the spelling of the name of the state according to
                  > you! Just had to kid you a little about that spelling! Things change
                  > every day, so it is hard to keep up!
                  >
                  >
                  >
                  > Harold
                  >
                  >
                  >
                  >
                  >
                  >
                  >
                  > ________________________________
                  >
                  > From: azaleas@yahoogroups.com [mailto:azaleas@yahoogroups.com] On Behalf
                  > Of Steve Henning
                  > Sent: Sunday, May 30, 2010 9:21 PM
                  > To: azaleas@yahoogroups.com
                  > Subject: [AZ] [rhodo] Re: North America, States and Provinces without
                  > native rhododendron spec
                  >
                  >
                  >
                  >
                  >
                  >
                  >
                  > Hi Harold,
                  >
                  > I goofed in a previous post and left out some of the states with Ledum.
                  > According to the USDA (http://plants.usda.gov/), Michigan, Minnesota,
                  > Nevada, North Dakota, South Dakota, Utah and Wyomining have only Ledum
                  > (R. groenlandicum, R. neoglandulosum or R. subarticum).
                  >
                  > So that leaves Arizona, Indiana, Iowa, Kansas, Nebraska, and New Mexico
                  > as not having native stands of rhododendrons.
                  >
                  > So 6 states in the continental US do not have native stands of
                  > rhododendrons.
                  >
                  > Steve Henning
                  >
                  > --- In azaleas@yahoogroups.com <mailto:azaleas%40yahoogroups.com> ,
                  > "Harold Greer" <hgreer@> wrote:
                  > >
                  > > Thanks everyone for the research and comments.
                  > >
                  > >
                  > >
                  > > Let us leave Hawaii out of the states, since it is not on the
                  > continent
                  > > of North America.
                  > >
                  > >
                  > >
                  > > So the states without easily known rhododendrons are:
                  > >
                  > > North Dakota
                  > >
                  > > South Dakota
                  > >
                  > > Nebraska
                  > >
                  > > Arizona
                  > >
                  > > New Mexico
                  > >
                  > >
                  > >
                  > > If I missed a comment that proves there are rhododendrons native in
                  > > these states let me hear. That means that only five states out of 49
                  > do
                  > > not have native rhododendrons. And you commonly hear that
                  > rhododendrons
                  > > do not grow in much of North America. Of course that does not prove
                  > > that for this reason rhododendrons are easy to grow in every part of
                  > > North America. I am also not convinced that R. occidentale does not
                  > > cross the border into Mexico, but I certainly can't prove it does, and
                  > > it may not. That would be a wonderful area to explore if you can dodge
                  > > the drug trafficers! Though I am sure you could find some species
                  > > there, Canabis that is!
                  > >
                  > >
                  > >
                  > > I thought that the website
                  > > http://plants.usda.gov/java/profile?symbol=RHODO was very poorly
                  > > informed and they mention many rhododendrons that are not even native
                  > to
                  > > North America such as R. brachycarpum and R. molle. Yes, they are
                  > > rhododendron species, but they don't seem to match the purpose of that
                  > > site. Another example of government efficiency and competence or I
                  > > should say incompetence! And some want to add to the scope of our
                  > > government. Sorry, I don't want to make this political, but I could
                  > not
                  > > resist making that statement. Excuse me; I will try to be better
                  > > behaved in the future.
                  > >
                  > >
                  > >
                  > > It is my hope to do an article on North American Rhododendron species
                  > > and probably a DVD with pictures of their habitat and flowers. I don't
                  > > think any one has done a comprehensive article and study on that
                  > > subject.
                  > >
                  > >
                  > >
                  > > Again thank you for all of your comments and knowledge. I really
                  > > appreciate the knowledge that is so freely shared on both the
                  > > rhododendron and azalea groups. None of us are always correct, but we
                  > > share knowledge and experience. I try to answer as many questions as I
                  > > can, using my 50,000 picture collection to help illustrate my points.
                  > I
                  > > am always happy to share pictures with anyone who asks.
                  > >
                  > >
                  > >
                  > > Harold Greer
                  > >
                  > >
                  > >
                  > >
                  > >
                  > >
                  > >
                  > > ________________________________
                  > >
                  > > From: rhodo@yahoogroups.com <mailto:rhodo%40yahoogroups.com>
                  > [mailto:rhodo@yahoogroups.com <mailto:rhodo%40yahoogroups.com> ] On
                  > Behalf Of
                  > > sjperk5
                  > > Sent: Sunday, May 30, 2010 1:52 PM
                  > > To: rhodo@yahoogroups.com <mailto:rhodo%40yahoogroups.com>
                  > > Subject: [rhodo] Re: North America, States and Provinces without
                  > native
                  > > rhododendron species
                  > >
                  > >
                  > >
                  > >
                  > >
                  > > Ledum grows in Utah
                  > >
                  > > --- In rhodo@yahoogroups.com <mailto:rhodo%40yahoogroups.com>
                  > <mailto:rhodo%40yahoogroups.com> , "Harold
                  > > Greer" <hgreer@> wrote:
                  > > >
                  > > >
                  > > >
                  > > >
                  > > >
                  > > >
                  > > >
                  > > > I am going to ask what states in the U.S. and provinces in Canada do
                  > > not
                  > > > have at least one native Rhododendron species. I have not done any
                  > > > research on this which I could do, but I thought it might make a
                  > good
                  > > > topic for thought in our group. I am not saying I am right in this,
                  > I
                  > > > just want feed back. In time I hope to do a program on North
                  > American
                  > > > Rhododendrons. Remember that the Genus Ledum is now included in the
                  > > > Genus Rhododendron.
                  > > >
                  > > >
                  > > >
                  > > > At first glace many of you are going to say most states don't have a
                  > > > rhododendron species. But that is not true. I am going to list the
                  > > > states that first come to mind as having no rhododendron species. I
                  > > ask
                  > > > the many superior minds on both the Azalea and Rhododendrons groups
                  > to
                  > > > comment. I am going to list the following as the only states that do
                  > > > not have a native rhododendron species:
                  > > >
                  > > > North Dakota
                  > > >
                  > > > South Dakota
                  > > >
                  > > > Nebraska
                  > > >
                  > > > Iowa
                  > > >
                  > > > Illinois
                  > > >
                  > > > Kansas
                  > > >
                  > > > Missouri
                  > > >
                  > > > Utah
                  > > >
                  > > > Arizona
                  > > >
                  > > > New Mexico
                  > > >
                  > > > Hawaii
                  > > >
                  > > >
                  > > >
                  > > > I think all of Canada has native rhododendrons at least in the north
                  > > > part or each province. Mexico may have R. occidentale in Baja
                  > > > California, but I have not seen that fact proven, though R.
                  > > occidentale
                  > > > we know grows close to the Mexican border.
                  > > >
                  > > >
                  > > >
                  > > > That is only 11 states out of 50, and Hawaii is not part of the
                  > > > mainland. Oklahoma and Arkansas I question, but I think some of
                  > those
                  > > > plants we call azaleas may grow there.
                  > > >
                  > > >
                  > > >
                  > > > How many of you are reading this and saying, "He's crazy, now we
                  > know
                  > > > Harold Greer can't be believed". But let's check it out. I know much
                  > > > of the information can be found with searches on the internet. So
                  > > let's
                  > > > check it out as I said. I am not saying I am 100% correct. This
                  > should
                  > > > provide some interesting information that may not easily be found.
                  > > >
                  > > >
                  > > >
                  > > > Harold Greer
                  > > >
                  > >
                  >
                • sjperk5
                  Sally and I have botanized an area just north / northwest of Las Vegas which certainly was not subalpine but on the other hand a pretty good wooded forest
                  Message 8 of 9 , May 31, 2010
                    Sally and I have botanized an area just north / northwest of Las Vegas which certainly was not subalpine but on the other hand a pretty good wooded forest plant population. Near Reno is a very good subapline to apline region.

                    John Perkins
                    Salem, NH

                    --- In azaleas@yahoogroups.com, "Harold Greer" <hgreer@...> wrote:
                    >
                    > I do know one other thing I did not mention about the Nevada subject
                    > when I looked at the map. The location of "Sharps" was south of Tonopah
                    > which would probably now be in the Tonapah Test Range, which might
                    > explain some things. If you believe in any conspiracy theories, that
                    > might explain why Uncle Theodore suddenly disappeared! I know it was
                    > said that he did not want to leave his land, but might have been forced
                    > to. Again, this is all conjecture and I have no intention of worrying
                    > about what happened to Uncle Theodore, though I do think history is
                    > interesting. We all need to learn from history.
                    >
                    >
                    >
                    > Harold Greer
                    >
                    >
                    >
                    > ________________________________
                    >
                    > From: azaleas@yahoogroups.com [mailto:azaleas@yahoogroups.com] On Behalf
                    > Of Harold Greer
                    > Sent: Sunday, May 30, 2010 10:31 PM
                    > To: azaleas@yahoogroups.com
                    > Subject: RE: [AZ] RE: [rhodo] Re: North America, States and Provinces
                    > without native rhododendron species
                    >
                    >
                    >
                    >
                    >
                    > Bill,
                    >
                    >
                    >
                    > I don't think R. occidentale grows in Nevada, but probably a Ledum (now
                    > Rhododendron) does. Nevada is a harsh climate but there are areas where
                    > Ledum could grow.
                    >
                    >
                    >
                    > I would like to do more travelling in Nevada. On a Nevada subject, my
                    > father who would be 115 now if he were alive had an uncle on his
                    > mother's side (Uncle Theodore), who farmed a large piece of land in
                    > central Nevada. He raised fruit and the only way to ship his fruit out
                    > was by parcel post. I know my father visited there, and there was only
                    > one road in or out. Uncle Theodore was the Mayor, Sheriff and
                    > Postmaster of the community. It seems the name of the community was
                    > Sharp or Sharps, Nevada, not Sparks which is near Reno. A search of
                    > Google gives no results for Sharp, Nevada. I don't doubt what my father
                    > told me, as he was accurate in his details, but where this place was I
                    > don't know. I do know that Uncle Theodore suddenly disappeared and was
                    > never heard from again, though there was some communication with his son
                    > during my lifetime. Mysteries never cease! I don't think this story is
                    > wrong, though some details may be. I would love to know the whole
                    > truth.
                    >
                    >
                    >
                    > Well, now back to our subject of rhododendrons!
                    >
                    >
                    >
                    > Harold
                    >
                    >
                    >
                    > ________________________________
                    >
                    > From: azaleas@yahoogroups.com [mailto:azaleas@yahoogroups.com] On Behalf
                    > Of William C. Miller III
                    > Sent: Sunday, May 30, 2010 9:41 PM
                    > To: azaleas@yahoogroups.com
                    > Subject: Re: [AZ] RE: [rhodo] Re: North America, States and Provinces
                    > without native rhododendron species
                    >
                    >
                    >
                    >
                    >
                    > Harold,
                    >
                    > What have you found native in Nevada? Last fall, I had an occasion to
                    > visit the high desert, west of Lost Wages. It was a remarkably bleak
                    > and barren landscape. The predominant plants looked like tumble weed
                    > and a very stressed out cactus. The humidity was extremely low,
                    > although there was evidence of "gully-washers." Apparently, what
                    > rainfall they get comes almost all at once. If what I saw was
                    > representative of the entire state, I can't imagine rhododendrons
                    > surviving the temperatures and lack of humidity. Perhaps there are
                    > moderate environmental pockets to the west that would permit occidentale
                    > to sneak across from the CA border. Kron only mentions CA and Oregon
                    > for occidentale.
                    >
                    > Bill
                    >
                    > Harold Greer wrote:
                    >
                    >
                    >
                    > Thanks everyone for the research and comments.
                    >
                    >
                    >
                    > Let us leave Hawaii out of the states, since it is not on the
                    > continent of North America.
                    >
                    >
                    >
                    > So the states without easily known rhododendrons are:
                    >
                    > North Dakota
                    >
                    > South Dakota
                    >
                    > Nebraska
                    >
                    > Arizona
                    >
                    > New Mexico
                    >
                    >
                    >
                    > If I missed a comment that proves there are rhododendrons native
                    > in these states let me hear. That means that only five states out of 49
                    > do not have native rhododendrons. And you commonly hear that
                    > rhododendrons do not grow in much of North America. Of course that does
                    > not prove that for this reason rhododendrons are easy to grow in every
                    > part of North America. I am also not convinced that R. occidentale does
                    > not cross the border into Mexico, but I certainly can't prove it does,
                    > and it may not. That would be a wonderful area to explore if you can
                    > dodge the drug trafficers! Though I am sure you could find some species
                    > there, Canabis that is!
                    >
                    >
                    >
                    > I thought that the website
                    > http://plants.usda.gov/java/profile?symbol=RHODO
                    > <http://plants.usda.gov/java/profile?symbol=RHODO> was very poorly
                    > informed and they mention many rhododendrons that are not even native to
                    > North America such as R. brachycarpum and R. molle. Yes, they are
                    > rhododendron species, but they don't seem to match the purpose of that
                    > site. Another example of government efficiency and competence or I
                    > should say incompetence! And some want to add to the scope of our
                    > government. Sorry, I don't want to make this political, but I could not
                    > resist making that statement. Excuse me; I will try to be better
                    > behaved in the future.
                    >
                    >
                    >
                    > It is my hope to do an article on North American Rhododendron
                    > species and probably a DVD with pictures of their habitat and flowers.
                    > I don't think any one has done a comprehensive article and study on that
                    > subject.
                    >
                    >
                    >
                    > Again thank you for all of your comments and knowledge. I
                    > really appreciate the knowledge that is so freely shared on both the
                    > rhododendron and azalea groups. None of us are always correct, but we
                    > share knowledge and experience. I try to answer as many questions as I
                    > can, using my 50,000 picture collection to help illustrate my points. I
                    > am always happy to share pictures with anyone who asks.
                    >
                    >
                    >
                    > Harold Greer
                    >
                    >
                    >
                    >
                    >
                    >
                    >
                    >
                    > ________________________________
                    >
                    >
                    > From: rhodo@yahoogroups.com [mailto:rhodo@yahoogroups.com] On
                    > Behalf Of sjperk5
                    > Sent: Sunday, May 30, 2010 1:52 PM
                    > To: rhodo@yahoogroups.com
                    > Subject: [rhodo] Re: North America, States and Provinces without
                    > native rhododendron species
                    >
                    >
                    >
                    >
                    >
                    > Ledum grows in Utah
                    >
                    > --- In rhodo@yahoogroups.com <mailto:rhodo%40yahoogroups.com> ,
                    > "Harold Greer" <hgreer@> <mailto:hgreer@> wrote:
                    > >
                    > >
                    > >
                    > >
                    > >
                    > >
                    > >
                    > > I am going to ask what states in the U.S. and provinces in
                    > Canada do not
                    > > have at least one native Rhododendron species. I have not done
                    > any
                    > > research on this which I could do, but I thought it might make
                    > a good
                    > > topic for thought in our group. I am not saying I am right in
                    > this, I
                    > > just want feed back. In time I hope to do a program on North
                    > American
                    > > Rhododendrons. Remember that the Genus Ledum is now included
                    > in the
                    > > Genus Rhododendron.
                    > >
                    > >
                    > >
                    > > At first glace many of you are going to say most states don't
                    > have a
                    > > rhododendron species. But that is not true. I am going to list
                    > the
                    > > states that first come to mind as having no rhododendron
                    > species. I ask
                    > > the many superior minds on both the Azalea and Rhododendrons
                    > groups to
                    > > comment. I am going to list the following as the only states
                    > that do
                    > > not have a native rhododendron species:
                    > >
                    > > North Dakota
                    > >
                    > > South Dakota
                    > >
                    > > Nebraska
                    > >
                    > > Iowa
                    > >
                    > > Illinois
                    > >
                    > > Kansas
                    > >
                    > > Missouri
                    > >
                    > > Utah
                    > >
                    > > Arizona
                    > >
                    > > New Mexico
                    > >
                    > > Hawaii
                    > >
                    > >
                    > >
                    > > I think all of Canada has native rhododendrons at least in the
                    > north
                    > > part or each province. Mexico may have R. occidentale in Baja
                    > > California, but I have not seen that fact proven, though R.
                    > occidentale
                    > > we know grows close to the Mexican border.
                    > >
                    > >
                    > >
                    > > That is only 11 states out of 50, and Hawaii is not part of
                    > the
                    > > mainland. Oklahoma and Arkansas I question, but I think some
                    > of those
                    > > plants we call azaleas may grow there.
                    > >
                    > >
                    > >
                    > > How many of you are reading this and saying, "He's crazy, now
                    > we know
                    > > Harold Greer can't be believed". But let's check it out. I
                    > know much
                    > > of the information can be found with searches on the internet.
                    > So let's
                    > > check it out as I said. I am not saying I am 100% correct.
                    > This should
                    > > provide some interesting information that may not easily be
                    > found.
                    > >
                    > >
                    > >
                    > > Harold Greer
                    > >
                    >
                  • sjperk5
                    Harold I think we can now say Arizonia is most likely a no as well as Nebraska. New Mexico is now the wild care.
                    Message 9 of 9 , Jun 1 5:04 PM
                      Harold

                      I think we can now say Arizonia is most likely a no as well as Nebraska. New Mexico is now the wild care.

                      http://www.canotia.org/volumes/CANOTIA_2008_Vol4_2_Anderson_Ericaceae.pdf

                      but notice Phyllodoce empetriformis was found there in 1935.

                      I am not sure I believe this but any area that can support Phyllodoce empetriformis could support high alpine Rhododendrons especially ledum.

                      John Perkins
                      Salem, NH

                      --- In azaleas@yahoogroups.com, "sjperk5" <sjperk5@...> wrote:
                      >
                      > Sally and I have botanized an area just north / northwest of Las Vegas which certainly was not subalpine but on the other hand a pretty good wooded forest plant population. Near Reno is a very good subapline to apline region.
                      >
                      > John Perkins
                      > Salem, NH
                      >
                      > --- In azaleas@yahoogroups.com, "Harold Greer" <hgreer@> wrote:
                      > >
                      > > I do know one other thing I did not mention about the Nevada subject
                      > > when I looked at the map. The location of "Sharps" was south of Tonopah
                      > > which would probably now be in the Tonapah Test Range, which might
                      > > explain some things. If you believe in any conspiracy theories, that
                      > > might explain why Uncle Theodore suddenly disappeared! I know it was
                      > > said that he did not want to leave his land, but might have been forced
                      > > to. Again, this is all conjecture and I have no intention of worrying
                      > > about what happened to Uncle Theodore, though I do think history is
                      > > interesting. We all need to learn from history.
                      > >
                      > >
                      > >
                      > > Harold Greer
                      > >
                      > >
                      > >
                      > > ________________________________
                      > >
                      > > From: azaleas@yahoogroups.com [mailto:azaleas@yahoogroups.com] On Behalf
                      > > Of Harold Greer
                      > > Sent: Sunday, May 30, 2010 10:31 PM
                      > > To: azaleas@yahoogroups.com
                      > > Subject: RE: [AZ] RE: [rhodo] Re: North America, States and Provinces
                      > > without native rhododendron species
                      > >
                      > >
                      > >
                      > >
                      > >
                      > > Bill,
                      > >
                      > >
                      > >
                      > > I don't think R. occidentale grows in Nevada, but probably a Ledum (now
                      > > Rhododendron) does. Nevada is a harsh climate but there are areas where
                      > > Ledum could grow.
                      > >
                      > >
                      > >
                      > > I would like to do more travelling in Nevada. On a Nevada subject, my
                      > > father who would be 115 now if he were alive had an uncle on his
                      > > mother's side (Uncle Theodore), who farmed a large piece of land in
                      > > central Nevada. He raised fruit and the only way to ship his fruit out
                      > > was by parcel post. I know my father visited there, and there was only
                      > > one road in or out. Uncle Theodore was the Mayor, Sheriff and
                      > > Postmaster of the community. It seems the name of the community was
                      > > Sharp or Sharps, Nevada, not Sparks which is near Reno. A search of
                      > > Google gives no results for Sharp, Nevada. I don't doubt what my father
                      > > told me, as he was accurate in his details, but where this place was I
                      > > don't know. I do know that Uncle Theodore suddenly disappeared and was
                      > > never heard from again, though there was some communication with his son
                      > > during my lifetime. Mysteries never cease! I don't think this story is
                      > > wrong, though some details may be. I would love to know the whole
                      > > truth.
                      > >
                      > >
                      > >
                      > > Well, now back to our subject of rhododendrons!
                      > >
                      > >
                      > >
                      > > Harold
                      > >
                      > >
                      > >
                      > > ________________________________
                      > >
                      > > From: azaleas@yahoogroups.com [mailto:azaleas@yahoogroups.com] On Behalf
                      > > Of William C. Miller III
                      > > Sent: Sunday, May 30, 2010 9:41 PM
                      > > To: azaleas@yahoogroups.com
                      > > Subject: Re: [AZ] RE: [rhodo] Re: North America, States and Provinces
                      > > without native rhododendron species
                      > >
                      > >
                      > >
                      > >
                      > >
                      > > Harold,
                      > >
                      > > What have you found native in Nevada? Last fall, I had an occasion to
                      > > visit the high desert, west of Lost Wages. It was a remarkably bleak
                      > > and barren landscape. The predominant plants looked like tumble weed
                      > > and a very stressed out cactus. The humidity was extremely low,
                      > > although there was evidence of "gully-washers." Apparently, what
                      > > rainfall they get comes almost all at once. If what I saw was
                      > > representative of the entire state, I can't imagine rhododendrons
                      > > surviving the temperatures and lack of humidity. Perhaps there are
                      > > moderate environmental pockets to the west that would permit occidentale
                      > > to sneak across from the CA border. Kron only mentions CA and Oregon
                      > > for occidentale.
                      > >
                      > > Bill
                      > >
                      > > Harold Greer wrote:
                      > >
                      > >
                      > >
                      > > Thanks everyone for the research and comments.
                      > >
                      > >
                      > >
                      > > Let us leave Hawaii out of the states, since it is not on the
                      > > continent of North America.
                      > >
                      > >
                      > >
                      > > So the states without easily known rhododendrons are:
                      > >
                      > > North Dakota
                      > >
                      > > South Dakota
                      > >
                      > > Nebraska
                      > >
                      > > Arizona
                      > >
                      > > New Mexico
                      > >
                      > >
                      > >
                      > > If I missed a comment that proves there are rhododendrons native
                      > > in these states let me hear. That means that only five states out of 49
                      > > do not have native rhododendrons. And you commonly hear that
                      > > rhododendrons do not grow in much of North America. Of course that does
                      > > not prove that for this reason rhododendrons are easy to grow in every
                      > > part of North America. I am also not convinced that R. occidentale does
                      > > not cross the border into Mexico, but I certainly can't prove it does,
                      > > and it may not. That would be a wonderful area to explore if you can
                      > > dodge the drug trafficers! Though I am sure you could find some species
                      > > there, Canabis that is!
                      > >
                      > >
                      > >
                      > > I thought that the website
                      > > http://plants.usda.gov/java/profile?symbol=RHODO
                      > > <http://plants.usda.gov/java/profile?symbol=RHODO> was very poorly
                      > > informed and they mention many rhododendrons that are not even native to
                      > > North America such as R. brachycarpum and R. molle. Yes, they are
                      > > rhododendron species, but they don't seem to match the purpose of that
                      > > site. Another example of government efficiency and competence or I
                      > > should say incompetence! And some want to add to the scope of our
                      > > government. Sorry, I don't want to make this political, but I could not
                      > > resist making that statement. Excuse me; I will try to be better
                      > > behaved in the future.
                      > >
                      > >
                      > >
                      > > It is my hope to do an article on North American Rhododendron
                      > > species and probably a DVD with pictures of their habitat and flowers.
                      > > I don't think any one has done a comprehensive article and study on that
                      > > subject.
                      > >
                      > >
                      > >
                      > > Again thank you for all of your comments and knowledge. I
                      > > really appreciate the knowledge that is so freely shared on both the
                      > > rhododendron and azalea groups. None of us are always correct, but we
                      > > share knowledge and experience. I try to answer as many questions as I
                      > > can, using my 50,000 picture collection to help illustrate my points. I
                      > > am always happy to share pictures with anyone who asks.
                      > >
                      > >
                      > >
                      > > Harold Greer
                      > >
                      > >
                      > >
                      > >
                      > >
                      > >
                      > >
                      > >
                      > > ________________________________
                      > >
                      > >
                      > > From: rhodo@yahoogroups.com [mailto:rhodo@yahoogroups.com] On
                      > > Behalf Of sjperk5
                      > > Sent: Sunday, May 30, 2010 1:52 PM
                      > > To: rhodo@yahoogroups.com
                      > > Subject: [rhodo] Re: North America, States and Provinces without
                      > > native rhododendron species
                      > >
                      > >
                      > >
                      > >
                      > >
                      > > Ledum grows in Utah
                      > >
                      > > --- In rhodo@yahoogroups.com <mailto:rhodo%40yahoogroups.com> ,
                      > > "Harold Greer" <hgreer@> <mailto:hgreer@> wrote:
                      > > >
                      > > >
                      > > >
                      > > >
                      > > >
                      > > >
                      > > >
                      > > > I am going to ask what states in the U.S. and provinces in
                      > > Canada do not
                      > > > have at least one native Rhododendron species. I have not done
                      > > any
                      > > > research on this which I could do, but I thought it might make
                      > > a good
                      > > > topic for thought in our group. I am not saying I am right in
                      > > this, I
                      > > > just want feed back. In time I hope to do a program on North
                      > > American
                      > > > Rhododendrons. Remember that the Genus Ledum is now included
                      > > in the
                      > > > Genus Rhododendron.
                      > > >
                      > > >
                      > > >
                      > > > At first glace many of you are going to say most states don't
                      > > have a
                      > > > rhododendron species. But that is not true. I am going to list
                      > > the
                      > > > states that first come to mind as having no rhododendron
                      > > species. I ask
                      > > > the many superior minds on both the Azalea and Rhododendrons
                      > > groups to
                      > > > comment. I am going to list the following as the only states
                      > > that do
                      > > > not have a native rhododendron species:
                      > > >
                      > > > North Dakota
                      > > >
                      > > > South Dakota
                      > > >
                      > > > Nebraska
                      > > >
                      > > > Iowa
                      > > >
                      > > > Illinois
                      > > >
                      > > > Kansas
                      > > >
                      > > > Missouri
                      > > >
                      > > > Utah
                      > > >
                      > > > Arizona
                      > > >
                      > > > New Mexico
                      > > >
                      > > > Hawaii
                      > > >
                      > > >
                      > > >
                      > > > I think all of Canada has native rhododendrons at least in the
                      > > north
                      > > > part or each province. Mexico may have R. occidentale in Baja
                      > > > California, but I have not seen that fact proven, though R.
                      > > occidentale
                      > > > we know grows close to the Mexican border.
                      > > >
                      > > >
                      > > >
                      > > > That is only 11 states out of 50, and Hawaii is not part of
                      > > the
                      > > > mainland. Oklahoma and Arkansas I question, but I think some
                      > > of those
                      > > > plants we call azaleas may grow there.
                      > > >
                      > > >
                      > > >
                      > > > How many of you are reading this and saying, "He's crazy, now
                      > > we know
                      > > > Harold Greer can't be believed". But let's check it out. I
                      > > know much
                      > > > of the information can be found with searches on the internet.
                      > > So let's
                      > > > check it out as I said. I am not saying I am 100% correct.
                      > > This should
                      > > > provide some interesting information that may not easily be
                      > > found.
                      > > >
                      > > >
                      > > >
                      > > > Harold Greer
                      > > >
                      > >
                      >
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