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Re: [AZ] Encores/petal blight

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  • Buddy Lee
    Here in Southeast Louisiana we have just experienced the warmest October on record. Heat, humidity and rain and I did not see any petal blight. Even in my
    Message 1 of 7 , Nov 2, 2004
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      Here in Southeast Louisiana we have just experienced the warmest October on record.  Heat, humidity and rain and I did not see any petal blight.  Even in my growing yard, under regular irrigation, I do not see any signs of petal blight on the flowers..  I think, from my past observations, that petal blight is not active in the fall. I feel that petal blight goes into bloom in the spring, under the right conditions, and then is dormant until the next Spring.  It may need a cold dormancy period to become activated.  Just guessing.

      Form the beginning of my breeding work with R. oldhamii, I've noticed that the seedlings tend not to be affected by lace bugs as with the more traditional azaleas.  This is not saying that these crosses are resistance to lace bugs, but it seems that lace bugs just dislike them.  I have never seen lace bug on the selection of R. oldhamii 'Fourth of July'.  I've even tried to infest the plant with lace bugs and they leave the plant for another azalea.

      Buddy Lee

      Zone 8 SE LLA

         



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    • William C. Miller III
      I agree with Buddy. It is my impression that petal blight is a spring phenomenon. I don t think I ve ever seen it in the fall. I think the mix of
      Message 2 of 7 , Nov 2, 2004
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        I agree with Buddy. It is my impression that petal blight is a spring
        phenomenon. I don't think I've ever seen it in the fall.

        I think the mix of temperature and humidity is the mechanism for the
        occurrence of petal blight (roughly the time that 'Martha Hitchcock'
        blooms) and not so much precipitation. While splashing may be part of
        the mechanism of spread, I think you are forgetting the bumble bee whom
        I believe is the primary culprit.

        Bill Miller
        Bethesda, Maryland

        Buddy Lee wrote:

        > Here in Southeast Louisiana we have just experienced the warmest
        > October on record. Heat, humidity and rain and I did not see any
        > petal blight. Even in my growing yard, under regular irrigation,
        > I do not see any signs of petal blight on the flowers.. I think,
        > from my past observations, that petal blight is not active in the
        > fall. I feel that petal blight goes into bloom in the spring,
        > under the right conditions, and then is dormant until the next
        > Spring. It may need a cold dormancy period to become activated.
        > Just guessing.
        >
        > Form the beginning of my breeding work with R. oldhamii, I've
        > noticed that the seedlings tend not to be affected by lace bugs as
        > with the more traditional azaleas. This is not saying that these
        > crosses are resistance to lace bugs, but it seems that lace bugs
        > just dislike them. I have never seen lace bug on the selection of
        > R. oldhamii 'Fourth of July'. I've even tried to infest the
        > plant with lace bugs and they leave the plant for another azalea.
        >
        > Buddy Lee
        >
        > Zone 8 SE LLA
        >
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