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Re: [AZ] Re: Azalea Buoys

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  • Mike Creel
    I know of at least two flammeum plants that established themselves in swamp conditions, one at Webb Wildlife Center in Hampton County and one at the Savannah
    Message 1 of 5 , Oct 31, 2009
      I know of at least two flammeum plants that established themselves in swamp conditions, one at Webb Wildlife Center in Hampton County and one at the Savannah River Site in Aiken County.  I personally visited the SRS flammeum in bloom, photographed it and am not growing seedlings from that plant.  Flammeum normally chooses steep slopes in sandy, droughty areas.  This large plant was growing in a flat area with Jack in the Pulpit and pooled water.  The water table must have been touching the roots, but the plant was very happy.
      I do think that we rhododendron gardeners could do more to encourage young people and the proletariat.  I for one cannot affort the trips that many of our members take, but I enjoy hearing about them.  When I speak to groups I encourage local and backayard plant exploring and experimentation and show people how much can be done on a budget.  Just recently I conducted a workshop for the state native plant society on container bogs.  I am hoping to get my Powerpoint presentation posted online.  As part of the workshop I demonstrated the use of my CreelWay pots in propagation.
       
      Mike Creel, SC USDA Zone 8a
      Lexington County, South Carolina



      From: sjperk5 <sjperk5@...>
      To: azaleas@yahoogroups.com
      Sent: Sat, October 31, 2009 8:31:43 AM
      Subject: [AZ] Re: Azalea Buoys

       

      Mike

      I have never seen or heard of flammeum, calendulaceum, cumberlandense, or arborescens growing in very wet conditions but pink austrinum, austrinum, colemanii, occidentale, canadense, vaseyi, peri, prino, viscosum, atlanticum, and albifolium will.

      I simply do not know enough about alabamense, eastmaii, prunifolium, or cansecens to even comment.

      Considering that most Rhododendron growers take rhododendrons from all over the world and plant them in their yard, I do not think lack of adventure or the willingness to push the enevlope are problems.

      John Perkins
      Salem, NH

      --- In azaleas@yahoogroups .com, Mike Creel <mikeacreel@ ...> wrote:
      >
      > I am thinking that pretty much ANY of the 17 US native azalea species will adapt to growing in bog conditions where the water level rises and falls, and even survive inundation for a period.  Western azaleas thrive in such conditions in Cunningham Marsh preserve near Sebastopol, California.  I have corresponded with the stewards of that area.
      > My whimsical "tests" have so far shown that evergreen azaleas can be rooted and grown to the point of blooming in a floating pot.  A new experiment  of mine will hopefully show that an R. canadense seedling will thrive in a floating pot.  Next I will surface sew native azalea seeds (probably occidentale) in a floating pot.  Also I will stick deciduous azalea cuttings in a floating pot.  In all cases the floating pot has a layer of long fiber sphagnum moss perched above the water level.  Of course this probably has no commercial application, but it is fun.  I think that adding some fun to gardening of azaleas and rhododendrons will bring more people into ARS and ASA.  Too often most of us are unfriendly fogies, stuck in our ways and not willing to try new, interesting avenues.
      >  Mike Creel, SC USDA Zone 8a
      > Lexington County, South Carolina

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