Loading ...
Sorry, an error occurred while loading the content.

Wintering azaleas

Expand Messages
  • Cheryl Christian
    I live in zone 4, Upstate NY, and it gets quite cold here in the winters (-20 degrees). What should I do for my azaleas? I inherited a large rhododendron
    Message 1 of 10 , Oct 2, 2009
    • 0 Attachment
      I live in zone 4, Upstate NY, and it gets quite cold here in the winters (-20 degrees).  What should I do for my azaleas?  I inherited a large rhododendron that winters quite well with no protection at all.  Do I need to wrap the azaleas in burlap (as suggested by a friend), cover them in mulch, or do nothing?  This is my first experience with azaleas & would like to be able to keep them doing well.
       
      Thank you,
       
      Cheryl Christian
    • Nicholas Yarmoshuk
      Ms Christian Where in Upstate New York do you live? I know that there is a large planting of azaleas near Burlington Vermont. The planting is so large that it
      Message 2 of 10 , Oct 2, 2009
      • 0 Attachment
        Ms Christian

        Where in Upstate New York do you live?
        I know that there is a large planting of  azaleas near Burlington Vermont.  The planting is so large that it makes cover inpractical.
        Some deciduous azaleas are hardy to extremes colder than what you cite -  and they are never covered
        I have Kormo Shikibu, Kaempheri and Poukhanense, all evergereen azaleas that have come through the temperatures you quote here in Niagara.    I never cover my plants.
        It's important to now what variety of azalea you have.

        --
        Nicholas Yarmoshuk
        Secretary, Niagara Region Chapter,
        Rhododendron Society of Canada
        ARS District 12
        http://www.rhodoniagara.org

        On Fri, Oct 2, 2009 at 12:10 PM, Cheryl Christian <ckristi@...> wrote:
         

        I live in zone 4, Upstate NY, and it gets quite cold here in the winters (-20 degrees).  What should I do for my azaleas?  I inherited a large rhododendron that winters quite well with no protection at all.  Do I need to wrap the azaleas in burlap (as suggested by a friend), cover them in mulch, or do nothing?  This is my first experience with azaleas & would like to be able to keep them doing well.
         
        Thank you,
         
        Cheryl Christian



        --
        Nicholas Yarmoshuk
        Secretary, Niagara Region Chapter,
        Rhododendron Society of Canada
        ARS District 12
        http://www.rhodoniagara.org
      • Tom Schuetz
        Cheryl, please clarify: did you plant the azaleas or are they existing plantings? Do you know whether they are evergreen or deciduous? Tom Schuetz
        Message 3 of 10 , Oct 2, 2009
        • 0 Attachment
          Cheryl, please clarify: did you plant the azaleas or are they existing plantings? Do you know whether they are evergreen or deciduous?
          Tom Schuetz
          schuetz101@...
          Mechanicsburg, PA   USDA Zone 6a
          ----- Original Message -----
          Sent: Friday, October 02, 2009 12:10 PM
          Subject: [AZ] Wintering azaleas

           

          I live in zone 4, Upstate NY, and it gets quite cold here in the winters (-20 degrees).  What should I do for my azaleas?  I inherited a large rhododendron that winters quite well with no protection at all.  Do I need to wrap the azaleas in burlap (as suggested by a friend), cover them in mulch, or do nothing?  This is my first experience with azaleas & would like to be able to keep them doing well.
           
          Thank you,
           
          Cheryl Christian

        • Theodore Kovaleff
          We live in an area of VT that is a 4/5 [Saxtons River VT 05154] . What is the best way to protect our plants. Note that we have just planted a group of new
          Message 4 of 10 , Oct 26, 2009
          • 0 Attachment
            We live in an area of VT that is a 4/5 [Saxtons River VT 05154] . What is the best way to protect our plants. Note that we have just planted a group of new plants.

            Should I cover them with leaves? Cover the ground around them with leaves. I plan to spray them with an oil solution to prevent the leaves from being overly dried by the winter winds.

            Would like to be directed to sites that will help both for the winter and for year round so I can be certain that I am doing the right thing for them.

            In advance, many thanks

            T Kovaleff
            tkovaleff@...


          • William C. Miller III
            Mr. Kovaleff, I don t have any experience with using anti-transpirants but I don t believe I would use just any oil product. Perhaps others, particularly the
            Message 5 of 10 , Oct 26, 2009
            • 0 Attachment
              Mr. Kovaleff,

              I don't have any experience with using anti-transpirants but I don't believe I would use just any oil product.  Perhaps others, particularly the Michigan folks who may be lurking, can provide more information, but there is a product called Wilt-Pruf(R) which is a natural pine oil emulsion that is supposed to act as a protective coating to reduce water loss.  For more info about this product, check out this link:

               http://www.wiltpruf.com/Home/Story/tabid/392/Default.aspx

              Again, I've never used Wilt-Pruf(R), so I am not speaking from experience.

              William C. Miller III
              Bethesda, Maryland
              www.theazaleaworks.com


              Theodore Kovaleff wrote:
               

              We live in an area of VT that is a 4/5 [Saxtons River VT 05154] . What is the best way to protect our plants. Note that we have just planted a group of new plants.

              Should I cover them with leaves? Cover the ground around them with leaves. I plan to spray them with an oil solution to prevent the leaves from being overly dried by the winter winds.

              Would like to be directed to sites that will help both for the winter and for year round so I can be certain that I am doing the right thing for them.

              In advance, many thanks

              T Kovaleff
              tkovaleff@gmail. com


            • Larry Wallace
              Terpenes are a kind of latex. My P*encil Cacti* (Euphorbia tirucalli) if scratched ooze terpenes. I brought them in for the winter. I have my doubts. Some
              Message 6 of 10 , Oct 26, 2009
              • 0 Attachment
                Terpenes are a kind of latex.  My Pencil Cacti (Euphorbia tirucalli) if scratched ooze terpenes.  I brought them in for the winter.  I have my doubts.

                Some are considering some Euphorbias for diesel fuel.  It is a truly bizarre genus.
                --
                Larry Wallace
                Cincinnati
              • Nicholas Yarmoshuk
                What sort of plants do you have . . . i.e. what varieties. How large are they? If I recall correctly there is a large planting of deciduous azaleas near
                Message 7 of 10 , Oct 26, 2009
                • 0 Attachment
                  What sort of plants do you have . . .  i.e. what varieties.   How large are they?

                  If I recall correctly there is a large planting of deciduous azaleas near Burlington Vt.,  perhaps someone there can recommend local practices.

                  An oil solution to prevent dessication?.  That is a new one on me . . . . . I'd love to hear others' comments on that practice.

                  Pine needles and oak leaves - not Maple leaves - within a little frame should protect the plants from dessication. 

                  Doesn't Vermont get a lot of snow?  That is the best possible protector.


                  Nicholas Yarmoshuk
                  Secretary, Niagara Region Chapter,
                  Rhododendron Society of Canada,
                  St. Catharines ON, L2R4H9
                  http://www.rhodoniagara.org

                  On Mon, Oct 26, 2009 at 7:28 PM, Theodore Kovaleff <tkovaleff@...> wrote:
                   

                  We live in an area of VT that is a 4/5 [Saxtons River VT 05154] . What is the best way to protect our plants. Note that we have just planted a group of new plants.

                  Should I cover them with leaves? Cover the ground around them with leaves. I plan to spray them with an oil solution to prevent the leaves from being overly dried by the winter winds.

                  Would like to be directed to sites that will help both for the winter and for year round so I can be certain that I am doing the right thing for them.

                  In advance, many thanks

                  T Kovaleff
                  tkovaleff@...





                  --
                • John Migas
                  Mr. Kovaleff, As Mr. William C. Miller III stated, Wilt Pruf is a great product. Here in Michigan No Wilt product is also available. I don t use any of
                  Message 8 of 10 , Oct 26, 2009
                  • 0 Attachment
                    Mr. Kovaleff,

                    As Mr. William C. Miller III stated, "Wilt Pruf" is a great product.
                    Here in Michigan "No Wilt" product is also available.

                    I don't use any of these products. We have good snow cover and the temperatures are not as severe as your area. Last winter we had 11 days that went below zero, with 3 days that were below -10 degrees.
                    There was no damage to any of the azaleas. I have been evaluating well over 500 different varieties of evergreen azaleas for years with good success.


                    A few other options you have is using a snow fence for wind protection or wrapping the plants with burlap. My mentor, Charles Mann used to collect all the Christmas trees in the area, cut off and wrap the branches around his more tender plants. This also made it a bit more difficult for the critters to munch on next spring's buds.
                    It may not look attractive, it will work.

                    Good luck........John Migas(Saugatuck, Michigan)



                    --- In azaleas@yahoogroups.com, "William C. Miller III" <bill@...> wrote:
                    >
                    > Mr. Kovaleff,
                    >
                    > I don't have any experience with using anti-transpirants but I don't
                    > believe I would use just any oil product. Perhaps others, particularly
                    > the Michigan folks who may be lurking, can provide more information, but
                    > there is a product called Wilt-Pruf(R) which is a natural pine oil
                    > emulsion that is supposed to act as a protective coating to reduce water
                    > loss. For more info about this product, check out this link:
                    >
                    > http://www.wiltpruf.com/Home/Story/tabid/392/Default.aspx
                    >
                    > Again, I've never used Wilt-Pruf(R), so I am not speaking from experience.
                    >
                    > William C. Miller III
                    > Bethesda, Maryland
                    > www.theazaleaworks.com
                    >
                    >
                    > Theodore Kovaleff wrote:
                    > >
                    > >
                    > > We live in an area of VT that is a 4/5 [Saxtons River VT 05154] . What
                    > > is the best way to protect our plants. Note that we have just planted
                    > > a group of new plants.
                    > >
                    > > Should I cover them with leaves? Cover the ground around them with
                    > > leaves. I plan to spray them with an oil solution to prevent the
                    > > leaves from being overly dried by the winter winds.
                    > >
                    > > Would like to be directed to sites that will help both for the winter
                    > > and for year round so I can be certain that I am doing the right thing
                    > > for them.
                    > >
                    > > In advance, many thanks
                    > >
                    > > T Kovaleff
                    > > tkovaleff@... <mailto:tkovaleff@...>
                    > >
                    > >
                    > >
                    >
                  • George Klump
                    I would tend to go with Nick here. The best way to prevent dessication is to keep moisture around the root zone. Cold winter winds will dessicate an azalea
                    Message 9 of 10 , Oct 26, 2009
                    • 0 Attachment
                      I would tend to go with Nick here.  The best way to prevent dessication is to keep moisture around the root zone.  Cold winter winds will dessicate an azalea beautifully, if the root zone area does not have plenty of moisture.  The Saxtons River area gets plenty of snow from what I understand.  Snow around the plant will make for excellent insulation.  I would add a good mulch as Nick suggests, if one wants to be really secure.

                      George Klump
                      Southern California Chapter, ARS/ASA

                      Nicholas Yarmoshuk wrote:
                       

                      What sort of plants do you have . . .  i.e. what varieties.   How large are they?

                      If I recall correctly there is a large planting of deciduous azaleas near Burlington Vt.,  perhaps someone there can recommend local practices.

                      An oil solution to prevent dessication? .  That is a new one on me . . . . . I'd love to hear others' comments on that practice.

                      Pine needles and oak leaves - not Maple leaves - within a little frame should protect the plants from dessication. 

                      Doesn't Vermont get a lot of snow?  That is the best possible protector.


                      Nicholas Yarmoshuk
                      Secretary, Niagara Region Chapter,
                      Rhododendron Society of Canada,
                      St. Catharines ON, L2R4H9
                      http://www.rhodonia gara.org

                      On Mon, Oct 26, 2009 at 7:28 PM, Theodore Kovaleff <tkovaleff@gmail. com> wrote:
                       

                      We live in an area of VT that is a 4/5 [Saxtons River VT 05154] . What is the best way to protect our plants. Note that we have just planted a group of new plants.

                      Should I cover them with leaves? Cover the ground around them with leaves. I plan to spray them with an oil solution to prevent the leaves from being overly dried by the winter winds.

                      Would like to be directed to sites that will help both for the winter and for year round so I can be certain that I am doing the right thing for them.

                      In advance, many thanks

                      T Kovaleff
                      tkovaleff@gmail. com





                      --
                    • SJPERK5
                      I am hoping you are growing some of the deciduous azaleas that were developed in Saxton s River by the late Frank Abbott, Sr. You are planting late and the
                      Message 10 of 10 , Oct 27, 2009
                      • 0 Attachment

                        I am hoping you are growing some of the deciduous azaleas that were developed in Saxton’s River by the late Frank Abbott, Sr.

                         

                        You are planting late and the root will have a short time to accommodate before the ground freezes. I would probably recommend if they are small that you protect them from rodents and rabbits with a small cylinder cage of welded wire or even double wrap of poultry wire now and after the ground freezes use white pine needles as a mulch that essentially covers them for the winter. Yes the snow will be a great insulation. Problems develop in late spring when the ground is still frozen but the sun is bright. You will have to learn about the winter sun in your location. That’s when the worse death occurs. Remember to remove the pine needles after the thaw has occurred,  if not the insulation of pine needles will keep the ground under the plant cold too. Removed too early and the plant gets exposed to a warm March and April sun without any unfrozen moisture in the ground to draw from. Usually small plants need protection for the first one or 2 winters.

                         

                        If the plants are larger, wrap them on the sides only with burlap and stakes or use the snow fencing as recommended. Mulch after the ground freezes to protect the roots from freezing and thawing and the heaving that frequently occurs on new plantings. The suggestions of boughs from Christmas trees is a good one as if you already have the plants covered with snow by this time you probably will not need them and the ground has solidly frozen by then. Again this is late for planting in your area. September would have been better.

                         

                        Sally Perkins

                        Salem, NH

                         

                         

                         


                        From: azaleas@yahoogroups.com [mailto:azaleas@yahoogroups.com] On Behalf Of George Klump
                        Sent: Monday, October 26, 2009 11:38 PM
                        To: azaleas@yahoogroups.com
                        Subject: Re: [AZ] Wintering azaleas

                         



                        I would tend to go with Nick here.  The best way to prevent dessication is to keep moisture around the root zone.  Cold winter winds will dessicate an azalea beautifully, if the root zone area does not have plenty of moisture.  The Saxtons River area gets plenty of snow from what I understand.  Snow around the plant will make for excellent insulation.  I would add a good mulch as Nick suggests, if one wants to be really secure.

                        George Klump
                        Southern California Chapter, ARS/ASA

                        Nicholas Yarmoshuk wrote:

                         

                        What sort of plants do you have . . .  i.e. what varieties.   How large are they?

                        If I recall correctly there is a large planting of deciduous azaleas near Burlington Vt. ,  perhaps someone there can recommend local practices.

                        An oil solution to prevent dessication? .  That is a new one on me . . . . . I'd love to hear others' comments on that practice.

                        Pine needles and oak leaves - not Maple leaves - within a little frame should protect the plants from dessication. 

                        Doesn't Vermont get a lot of snow?  That is the best possible protector.


                        Nicholas Yarmoshuk
                        Secretary, Niagara Region Chapter,
                        Rhododendron Society of Canada ,
                        St. Catharines ON , L2R4H9
                        http://www.rhodonia gara.org

                        On Mon, Oct 26, 2009 at 7:28 PM, Theodore Kovaleff <tkovaleff@gmail. com> wrote:

                         

                        We live in an area of VT that is a 4/5 [ Saxtons River VT 05154 ] . What is the best way to protect our plants. Note that we have just planted a group of new plants.

                        Should I cover them with leaves? Cover the ground around them with leaves. I plan to spray them with an oil solution to prevent the leaves from being overly dried by the winter winds.

                        Would like to be directed to sites that will help both for the winter and for year round so I can be certain that I am doing the right thing for them.

                        In advance, many thanks

                        T Kovaleff
                        tkovaleff@gmail. com




                        --


                      Your message has been successfully submitted and would be delivered to recipients shortly.