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One azalea in the right place

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  • Mike Creel
    Today I try to group azaleas of the same species with similar colors, but early in my native azalea collecting days I just planted them as single specimens or
    Message 1 of 2 , Sep 1, 2009
    Today I try to group azaleas of the same species with similar colors, but early in my native azalea collecting days I just planted them as single specimens or in the groups that came in the mail order box, from a trip to a nursery or from a friend's house. My older native azalea beds prone to have a variety of colors with clashing colors and multiple seasons of show. I have moved some around to improve compositon.

    But my little Choice Cream azalea, a Fred Galle cross of austrinum and atlanticum (which today have both been proved to be tetraploids) is one azalea that I accidentally put in the right place. It stays short and bushy and adds something unique to the walk to our back door through the breezeway between our kitchen and garage.

    Mike Creel, Lexington, SC
  • Barry Sperling
    When I started recording the FFF of each plant I was curious about the flow of the seasons and having a measure of early and late each year. Since then,
    Message 2 of 2 , Sep 1, 2009
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      When I started recording the FFF of each plant I was curious about the
      flow of the seasons and having a measure of "early" and "late" each
      year. Since then, as the data has accumulated I've been able to start
      saying "earlier" or "later than average". However, the main use of FFF
      has developed into a transplant guide. Each fall (starting about Oct.
      15 and continuing until late April) I move plants around so that areas
      will all be in bloom at the same time. I prefer this "mass of color"
      model to having a plant here and another there in bloom. In starting a
      bed with plants whose bloom time is the same I guess at a color
      arrangement, based on the view from a particular place (often my back
      picture window or the middle of the back yard). After seeing the result
      and how the plants are growing I then move them around a bit for the
      next year. Over time I hope to get it right. The only bed that
      violates the principle, a little, is one in which each plant has a
      reddish flower. Within that bed I still try to group them by bloom
      time, though.
      Barry


      Mike Creel wrote:
      >
      > [Attachment(s) <#TopText> from Mike Creel included below]
      >
      > Today I try to group azaleas of the same species with similar colors,
      > but early in my native azalea collecting days I just planted them as
      > single specimens or in the groups that came in the mail order box,
      > from a trip to a nursery or from a friend's house. My older native
      > azalea beds prone to have a variety of colors with clashing colors and
      > multiple seasons of show. I have moved some around to improve compositon.
      >
      > But my little Choice Cream azalea, a Fred Galle cross of austrinum and
      > atlanticum (which today have both been proved to be tetraploids) is
      > one azalea that I accidentally put in the right place. It stays short
      > and bushy and adds something unique to the walk to our back door
      > through the breezeway between our kitchen and garage.
      >
      > Mike Creel, Lexington, SC
      >
      >
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