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RE: [AZ] Mystery Azalea

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  • Carlton LeMond
    I reported that I knew what the azalea was and thought I did until I begin to do some research to prove the cultivar. It was listed and tagged Tama No Hada a
    Message 1 of 24 , Oct 9, 2004
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      I reported that I knew what the azalea was and thought I did until I begin
      to do some research to prove the cultivar. It was listed and tagged "Tama No
      Hada" a Satsuki. Looking at the web site
      http://www.ag.auburn.edu/landscape/Satsukipage.html#TamaNoHada#2 it does not
      show Tama No Hada but #2. Now does anyone know where photo's of Satsuki are
      available?

      -----Original Message-----
      From: Will and Kate Ferrell [mailto:bearrun3@...]
      Sent: Friday, October 08, 2004 9:18 PM
      To: azaleas@yahoogroups.com
      Subject: Re: [AZ] Mystery Azalea


      I have several plants that I believe are the Mucronatum variant 'Sekidera' &
      Carlton's photo shows bloom & foliage that is different from what I have.
      As an aside, my Sekidera's heavy dark foliage & it's bloom are uncannily
      similar to the Encore 'Autumn Twist'. I might add that I believe both
      plants are virtually immune to lacebugs & unusually drought-tolerant.

      Will Ferrell

      ----- Original Message -----
      From: "Mike Creel" <mikeacreel@...>
      To: <azaleas@yahoogroups.com>
      Sent: Friday, October 08, 2004 3:43 PM
      Subject: Re: [AZ] Mystery Azalea


      >
      > Is there a full recruitment of blooms are just a few?
      > Are there typically three different flower forms
      > showing at the same time? Is the foliage very sticky
      > and glandular. In am in the process of rooting some
      > cuttings of such a plant from Alabama, that I have
      > identified as a form of Rh. mucronatum named Sedekira,
      > probably mispelled.
      > Mike Creel, Lexington, South Carollina
      >
      > --- Carlton LeMond <cllemond@...> wrote:
      >
      > > Just for fun, I have a mystery azalea that blooms
      > > twice a year (now in
      > > bloom) and the color is blotched red to pink, white
      > > to crème. It measures
      > > fully open at 5 1/4 inches after it fully opened
      > > across the bloom diagonal
      > > as shown but a few days later. The photo shows 4 1/2
      > > inches but it open more
      > > a couple of days later. In Zone 7 below Birmingham,
      > > it's normal spring bloom
      > > time is the middle of May depending on the spring
      > > bloom time. What do you
      > > think it is? I know but for fun what do you think?
      > >
      > > Carlton
      > >
      > >
      > >
      >
      > > ATTACHMENT part 2 image/jpeg name=Azalea & Rhodo
      > Identification 051.jpg
      >
      >
      > > ATTACHMENT part 3 image/jpeg name=Azalea & Rhodo
      > Identification 052.jpg
      >
      >
      >
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      When you reply to this email, PLEASE quote its relevant part(s) only, as
      context, and DELETE the rest - especially this line and the Yahoo lines.
      Also PLEASE tell us where you garden (city, state or at least your USDA
      zone).

      We welcome images RESIZED to be under 100KB in size - 640 x 480 pixel .jpg
      images at 50% or 1:40 compression are ideal.

      To unsubscribe, send an email to: azaleas-unsubscribe@yahoogroups.com


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    • William C. Miller III
      Carlton, I looked in several of the Satsuki dictionaries that I have and found no reference to Tama-no-hada . It is mentioned in Galle but the photo only
      Message 2 of 24 , Oct 9, 2004
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        Carlton,

        I looked in several of the Satsuki dictionaries that I have and found no
        reference to 'Tama-no-hada'. It is mentioned in Galle but the photo
        only shows the self colored flower which might give you the wrong
        impression if you didn't read the description. Your best bet would be
        to go back to the Auburn folks for an explanation. The existence of a
        #2 suggest that there is a #1. I'm not sure assigning numbers to
        Satsuki is a good idea given that they are extremely variable.

        Looking at the Web site that you referenced, I also note that they show
        'Kagetsumuji' as white with stripes. Since "muji" means self, the image
        is wrong. If it is white with stripes (assuming that it is the right
        plant to start with).... then it is 'Kagetsu' and the product of
        careless propagation. If it is the self colored sport of 'Kagetsu',
        then it is 'Kagetsumuji'.

        Bill Miller
        Bethesda, Maryland

        Carlton LeMond wrote:

        > I reported that I knew what the azalea was and thought I did until I begin
        > to do some research to prove the cultivar. It was listed and tagged
        > "Tama No
        > Hada" a Satsuki. Looking at the web site
        > http://www.ag.auburn.edu/landscape/Satsukipage.html#TamaNoHada#2 it
        > does not
        > show Tama No Hada but #2. Now does anyone know where photo's of
        > Satsuki are
        > available?
        >
        > -----Original Message-----
        > From: Will and Kate Ferrell [mailto:bearrun3@...]
        > Sent: Friday, October 08, 2004 9:18 PM
        > To: azaleas@yahoogroups.com
        > Subject: Re: [AZ] Mystery Azalea
        >
        >
        > I have several plants that I believe are the Mucronatum variant
        > 'Sekidera' &
        > Carlton's photo shows bloom & foliage that is different from what I have.
        > As an aside, my Sekidera's heavy dark foliage & it's bloom are uncannily
        > similar to the Encore 'Autumn Twist'. I might add that I believe both
        > plants are virtually immune to lacebugs & unusually drought-tolerant.
        >
        > Will Ferrell
        >
        > ----- Original Message -----
        > From: "Mike Creel" <mikeacreel@...>
        > To: <azaleas@yahoogroups.com>
        > Sent: Friday, October 08, 2004 3:43 PM
        > Subject: Re: [AZ] Mystery Azalea
        >
        >
        > >
        > > Is there a full recruitment of blooms are just a few?
        > > Are there typically three different flower forms
        > > showing at the same time? Is the foliage very sticky
        > > and glandular. In am in the process of rooting some
        > > cuttings of such a plant from Alabama, that I have
        > > identified as a form of Rh. mucronatum named Sedekira,
        > > probably mispelled.
        > > Mike Creel, Lexington, South Carollina
        > >
        > > --- Carlton LeMond <cllemond@...> wrote:
        > >
        > > > Just for fun, I have a mystery azalea that blooms
        > > > twice a year (now in
        > > > bloom) and the color is blotched red to pink, white
        > > > to crème. It measures
        > > > fully open at 5 1/4 inches after it fully opened
        > > > across the bloom diagonal
        > > > as shown but a few days later. The photo shows 4 1/2
        > > > inches but it open more
        > > > a couple of days later. In Zone 7 below Birmingham,
        > > > it's normal spring bloom
        > > > time is the middle of May depending on the spring
        > > > bloom time. What do you
        > > > think it is? I know but for fun what do you think?
        > > >
        > > > Carlton
        > > >
        > > >
        > > >
        > >
        > > > ATTACHMENT part 2 image/jpeg name=Azalea & Rhodo
        > > Identification 051.jpg
        > >
        > >
        > > > ATTACHMENT part 3 image/jpeg name=Azalea & Rhodo
        > > Identification 052.jpg
        > >
        > >
        > >
        >
        >
        >
        >
        >
      • Chris Klapwijk
        Attached is an image of mucronatum Sekidera . Although basicly white, it consistently sports lavender blooms on several branches. Chris Klapwijk Landley, B.C.
        Message 3 of 24 , Oct 9, 2004
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          Attached is an image of mucronatum 'Sekidera'.
          Although basicly white, it consistently sports lavender blooms on several branches.

          Chris Klapwijk
          Landley, B.C.
        • Thomas Milner
          Beautiful picture of Sekidera, Chris. What image program do you use to be able to label the cultivar name within the image frame? I do not have that
          Message 4 of 24 , Oct 9, 2004
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            Beautiful picture of Sekidera, Chris.  What image program do you use to be able to label the cultivar name within the image frame?  I do not have that capability and would find it extremely useful for slideshow presentations.
            Thanks, Tom Milner, Ms. Gulf Coast, zone 8b

            Chris Klapwijk wrote:

             Attached is an image of mucronatum 'Sekidera'.
            Although basicly white, it consistently sports lavender blooms on several branches.

            Chris Klapwijk
            Landley, B.C.
             
             

            When you reply to this email, PLEASE quote its relevant part(s) only, as context, and DELETE the rest - especially this line and the Yahoo lines.  Also PLEASE tell us where you garden (city, state or at least your USDA zone).

            We welcome images RESIZED to be under 100KB in size - 640 x 480 pixel .jpg images at 50% or 1:40 compression are ideal.

            To unsubscribe, send an email to: azaleas-unsubscribe@yahoogroups.com
             
             
             

          • Chris Klapwijk
            A number of image manipulation applications include that feature, PhotoShop, Paint Shop Pro, etc. Probably the easiest for batch processing is CopyRightLeft,
            Message 5 of 24 , Oct 9, 2004
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              A number of image manipulation applications include that feature, PhotoShop, Paint Shop Pro, etc.

              Probably the easiest for batch processing is CopyRightLeft, available for free here:
              http://www.lunerouge.org/gnu/wx/copyrightleft.zip

              Chris Klapwijk
              Langley, B.C.


              ----- Original Message -----
              From: "Thomas Milner" <tomilner@...>
              To: <azaleas@yahoogroups.com>
              Sent: Saturday, October 09, 2004 7:58 AM
              Subject: Re: [AZ] Sekidera and varied blooms


              Beautiful picture of Sekidera, Chris. What image program do you use to
              be able to label the cultivar name within the image frame? I do not
              have that capability and would find it extremely useful for slideshow
              presentations.
              Thanks, Tom Milner, Ms. Gulf Coast, zone 8b
            • Will and Kate Ferrell
              Mike, Mine looks pretty much like the photo Chris Klapwijk sent, tho the purplish sports are infrequent on my plants. The foliage is sticky & tends to be
              Message 6 of 24 , Oct 9, 2004
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                Mike,
                Mine looks pretty much like the photo Chris Klapwijk sent, tho' the
                purplish sports are infrequent on my plants. The foliage is sticky & tends
                to be darker & more leathery-looking than Chris' photo. Mine were rescued
                from a building site; the old home being demolished had been abandoned for
                12 years(thru some pretty dry summers) & the plant was 90% covered up by
                honeysuckle. Not sure is sepals are sticky.

                Will

                ----- Original Message -----
                From: "Mike Creel" <mikeacreel@...>
                To: <azaleas@yahoogroups.com>
                Sent: Friday, October 08, 2004 11:06 PM
                Subject: Re: [AZ] Sekidera and varied blooms


                >
                > Will, does your Sekidera produce three or more
                > distinctly different blooms, including lavendar, pink
                > varied, white with pink and a half and half? Does it
                > have very sticky to touch foliage, flowers and sepals?
                > I am rooting such an azalea from Alabama.
                > Mike Creel, Lexington, SC
                > --- Will and Kate Ferrell <bearrun3@...>
                > wrote:
                > > I have several plants that I believe are the
                > > Mucronatum variant 'Sekidera' &
                > > Carlton's photo shows bloom & foliage that is
                > > different from what I have.
                > > As an aside, my Sekidera's heavy dark foliage & it's
                > > bloom are uncannily
                > > similar to the Encore 'Autumn Twist'. I might add
                > > that I believe both
                > > plants are virtually immune to lacebugs & unusually
                > > drought-tolerant.
                > >
                > > Will Ferrell
                > >
                > > ----- Original Message -----
                > > From: "Mike Creel" <mikeacreel@...>
                > > To: <azaleas@yahoogroups.com>
                > > Sent: Friday, October 08, 2004 3:43 PM
                > > Subject: Re: [AZ] Mystery Azalea
                > >
                > >
                > > >
                > > > Is there a full recruitment of blooms are just a
                > > few?
                > > > Are there typically three different flower forms
                > > > showing at the same time? Is the foliage very
                > > sticky
                > > > and glandular. In am in the process of rooting
                > > some
                > > > cuttings of such a plant from Alabama, that I have
                > > > identified as a form of Rh. mucronatum named
                > > Sedekira,
                > > > probably mispelled.
                > > > Mike Creel, Lexington, South Carollina
                > > >
                > > > --- Carlton LeMond <cllemond@...> wrote:
                > > >
                > > > > Just for fun, I have a mystery azalea that
                > > blooms
                > > > > twice a year (now in
                > > > > bloom) and the color is blotched red to pink,
                > > white
                > > > > to crème. It measures
                > > > > fully open at 5 1/4 inches after it fully opened
                > > > > across the bloom diagonal
                > > > > as shown but a few days later. The photo shows 4
                > > 1/2
                > > > > inches but it open more
                > > > > a couple of days later. In Zone 7 below
                > > Birmingham,
                > > > > it's normal spring bloom
                > > > > time is the middle of May depending on the
                > > spring
                > > > > bloom time. What do you
                > > > > think it is? I know but for fun what do you
                > > think?
                > > > >
                > > > > Carlton
                > > > >
                > > > >
                > > > >
                > > >
                > > > > ATTACHMENT part 2 image/jpeg name=Azalea & Rhodo
                > > > Identification 051.jpg
                > > >
                > > >
                > > > > ATTACHMENT part 3 image/jpeg name=Azalea & Rhodo
                > > > Identification 052.jpg
                > > >
                > > >
                > > >
                > > > __________________________________________________
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                > > > When you reply to this email, PLEASE quote its
                > > relevant part(s) only, as
                > > context, and DELETE the rest - especially this line
                > > and the Yahoo lines.
                > > Also PLEASE tell us where you garden (city, state or
                > > at least your USDA
                > > zone).
                > > >
                > > > We welcome images RESIZED to be under 100KB in
                > > size - 640 x 480 pixel .jpg
                > > images at 50% or 1:40 compression are ideal.
                > > >
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                Also PLEASE tell us where you garden (city, state or at least your USDA
                zone).
                >
                > We welcome images RESIZED to be under 100KB in size - 640 x 480 pixel .jpg
                images at 50% or 1:40 compression are ideal.
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              • Mike Creel
                Chris, does your local cultivar of Sekidera have extremely sticky, glandular foliage. The one I am rooting from Alabama showed even more types of bloom,
                Message 7 of 24 , Oct 9, 2004
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                  Chris, does your local cultivar of Sekidera have
                  extremely sticky, glandular foliage. The one I am
                  rooting from Alabama showed even more types of bloom,
                  including some half sectored of two bloom colors.
                  Mike Creel, Lexington, SC

                  --- Chris Klapwijk <ChrisK@...> wrote:

                  > Attached is an image of mucronatum 'Sekidera'.
                  > Although basicly white, it consistently sports
                  > lavender blooms on several branches.
                  >
                  > Chris Klapwijk
                  > Landley, B.C.
                  >
                  >

                  > ATTACHMENT part 2 image/jpeg name=sekidera.jpg





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                • Chris Klapwijk
                  Mike, perhaps you have Quakeress . It is similar in colour to Sekidera , but exhibits greater variation in pattern. Chris ... From: Mike Creel
                  Message 8 of 24 , Oct 10, 2004
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                    Mike,

                    perhaps you have 'Quakeress'.
                    It is similar in colour to 'Sekidera', but exhibits greater variation in pattern.

                    Chris

                    ----- Original Message -----
                    From: "Mike Creel" <mikeacreel@...>
                    To: <azaleas@yahoogroups.com>
                    Sent: Saturday, October 09, 2004 4:49 PM
                    Subject: Re: [AZ] Sekidera and varied blooms

                    Chris, does your local cultivar of Sekidera have
                    extremely sticky, glandular foliage. The one I am
                    rooting from Alabama showed even more types of bloom,
                    including some half sectored of two bloom colors.
                    Mike Creel, Lexington, SC
                  • Chris Klapwijk
                    Mike, view Quakeress here: http://www.rosebay.org/chapterweb/hbgt120.htm http://www.rosebay.org/chapterweb/hbgt121.htm
                    Message 9 of 24 , Oct 10, 2004
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                    • Mike Creel
                      I stuck cuttings of Glen Dale Quakeress out in September, and the foliage of my Alabama parti-colored azalea from Alabama is entirely different, viscous
                      Message 10 of 24 , Oct 10, 2004
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                        I stuck cuttings of Glen Dale Quakeress out in
                        September, and the foliage of my Alabama parti-colored
                        azalea from Alabama is entirely different, viscous
                        sticky, not smooth as with Quakeress. The flower
                        blooms in both do look very similar. Maybe the heat
                        of Alabama creates more variety, even bloom size
                        varies. The description of my Alabama Sticky seems to
                        match an old macrosepalum variety, now renamed
                        mucronatum. We will see how it performs in the
                        midlands of South Carolina next spring. Will Ferrell
                        in North Carolna said that his Sekidera has sticky
                        foliage. My plant even has sticky large, elongate
                        sepals, macro- sepals.
                        Mike Creel, SC

                        --- Chris Klapwijk <ChrisK@...> wrote:
                        > Mike,
                        >
                        > perhaps you have 'Quakeress'.
                        > It is similar in colour to 'Sekidera', but exhibits
                        > greater variation in pattern.
                        >
                        > Chris
                        >
                        > ----- Original Message -----
                        > From: "Mike Creel" <mikeacreel@...>
                        > To: <azaleas@yahoogroups.com>
                        > Sent: Saturday, October 09, 2004 4:49 PM
                        > Subject: Re: [AZ] Sekidera and varied blooms
                        >
                        > Chris, does your local cultivar of Sekidera have
                        > extremely sticky, glandular foliage. The one I am
                        > rooting from Alabama showed even more types of
                        > bloom,
                        > including some half sectored of two bloom colors.
                        > Mike Creel, Lexington, SC
                        >
                        >




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                      • iffy123
                        This is a very pretty azalea with the white and violet blossoms. Does it grow in zone 8b? Barbara - Pass Christian ... From: Chris Klapwijk
                        Message 11 of 24 , Oct 11, 2004
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                          This is a very pretty azalea with the white and violet blossoms. Does it
                          grow in zone 8b?

                          Barbara - Pass Christian

                          -----Original Message-----
                          From: Chris Klapwijk [mailto:ChrisK@...]
                          Sent: Sunday, October 10, 2004 12:39 PM
                          To: azaleas@yahoogroups.com
                          Subject: Re: [AZ] Sekidera and varied blooms



                          Mike,

                          view 'Quakeress' here:

                          http://www.rosebay.org/chapterweb/hbgt120.htm
                          http://www.rosebay.org/chapterweb/hbgt121.htm
                          http://www.rosebay.org/chapterweb/hbgt122.htm

                          Chris




                          When you reply to this email, PLEASE quote its relevant part(s) only, as
                          context, and DELETE the rest - especially this line and the Yahoo lines.
                          Also PLEASE tell us where you garden (city, state or at least your USDA
                          zone).

                          We welcome images RESIZED to be under 100KB in size - 640 x 480 pixel .jpg
                          images at 50% or 1:40 compression are ideal.

                          To unsubscribe, send an email to: azaleas-unsubscribe@yahoogroups.com


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                        • austrinum
                          ... found no ... photo ... be ... of a ... I ve grown Tama no Hada (Jewelled Skin) for 10 years commercially. My original plant came indirectly from Nuccio.
                          Message 12 of 24 , Oct 12, 2004
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                            --- In azaleas@yahoogroups.com, "William C. Miller III" <bill@t...>
                            wrote:
                            > Carlton,
                            >
                            > I looked in several of the Satsuki dictionaries that I have and
                            found no
                            > reference to 'Tama-no-hada'. It is mentioned in Galle but the
                            photo
                            > only shows the self colored flower which might give you the wrong
                            > impression if you didn't read the description. Your best bet would
                            be
                            > to go back to the Auburn folks for an explanation. The existence
                            of a
                            > #2 suggest that there is a #1. I'm not sure assigning numbers to
                            > Satsuki is a good idea given that they are extremely variable.
                            >
                            >
                            > Bill Miller
                            > Bethesda, Maryland
                            >
                            I've grown Tama no Hada (Jewelled Skin) for 10 years commercially.
                            My original plant came indirectly from Nuccio. It's one of the mozt
                            vigorous satsuki that I grow. It's also the largest flower of any
                            satsuki that I've seen (up to 6").
                            Bill, the numbering concept works well for me. I think it's
                            originally attributed to Nuccio, isn't it? I know he used to
                            describe that system in his catalog.
                            While the numbering system doesn't give you a lot of detail, it does
                            provide a snapshot of what kind of flower you can expect from your
                            Satsuki. For, example: Kobai #1 is a white background with red
                            variations. Kobai #2 is predominantly red with white variations.
                            Kobai #3 is solid red. Doesn't that tell you a lot more than just
                            Kobai?

                            Maarten van der Giessen
                            Semmes (Mobile), Alabama
                          • William C. Miller III
                            Maarten, I m sure numbering began as a practice well before I came on the scene, and I understand its use. Certainly, the Nuccio Nursery goes back several
                            Message 13 of 24 , Oct 12, 2004
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                              Maarten,

                              I'm sure numbering began as a practice well before I came on the scene,
                              and I understand its use. Certainly, the Nuccio Nursery goes back
                              several generations (1935). I pulled some old Nuccio catalogs to see
                              what I could find (1982 and 1984) . I skimmed the azalea listings but
                              didn't find any numbered plants (of any hybrid group not just Satsuki)
                              or any kind of discussion of the practice in those particular catalogs,
                              so I cannot confirm the Nuccio connection.

                              I remember hearing about 'Grace Freeman' #2 which for some reason is
                              sometimes listed as a Back Acres instead of the sport of a Glenn Dale,
                              and Frank White carried 'Maihime' #2 in his 1983 catalog.

                              While I appreciate that numbering affords an additional level of
                              distinguishing variations of the same plant (greater precision), I
                              guess my concern is that using a numbering system on a highly variable
                              Satsuki (not generally known for their stability) background can easily
                              result in #2 tags on #1 flowers.... or #1 tags on #3 flowers which would
                              seem to translate to a giant step backwards. Except for the problem
                              that you would encounter if you tried to register a numbered cultivar,
                              it seems like it might be a workable approach.

                              Bill Miller
                              Bethesda, Maryland




                              austrinum wrote:

                              >
                              > --- In azaleas@yahoogroups.com, "William C. Miller III" <bill@t...>
                              > wrote:
                              > > Carlton,
                              > >
                              > > I looked in several of the Satsuki dictionaries that I have and
                              > found no
                              > > reference to 'Tama-no-hada'. It is mentioned in Galle but the
                              > photo
                              > > only shows the self colored flower which might give you the wrong
                              > > impression if you didn't read the description. Your best bet would
                              > be
                              > > to go back to the Auburn folks for an explanation. The existence
                              > of a
                              > > #2 suggest that there is a #1. I'm not sure assigning numbers to
                              > > Satsuki is a good idea given that they are extremely variable.
                              > >
                              > >
                              > > Bill Miller
                              > > Bethesda, Maryland
                              > >
                              > I've grown Tama no Hada (Jewelled Skin) for 10 years commercially.
                              > My original plant came indirectly from Nuccio. It's one of the mozt
                              > vigorous satsuki that I grow. It's also the largest flower of any
                              > satsuki that I've seen (up to 6").
                              > Bill, the numbering concept works well for me. I think it's
                              > originally attributed to Nuccio, isn't it? I know he used to
                              > describe that system in his catalog.
                              > While the numbering system doesn't give you a lot of detail, it does
                              > provide a snapshot of what kind of flower you can expect from your
                              > Satsuki. For, example: Kobai #1 is a white background with red
                              > variations. Kobai #2 is predominantly red with white variations.
                              > Kobai #3 is solid red. Doesn't that tell you a lot more than just
                              > Kobai?
                              >
                              > Maarten van der Giessen
                              > Semmes (Mobile), Alabama
                              >
                              >
                              >
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                              >
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                              > as context, and DELETE the rest - especially this line and the Yahoo
                              > lines. Also PLEASE tell us where you garden (city, state or at least
                              > your USDA zone).
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                            • John Thornton
                              Mystery Azalea: Enclosed you will find photos, and soil test from a native azalea discovered by Steve Yeatts. The May blooming plant is low growing, highly
                              Message 14 of 24 , Oct 15, 2005
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                                Mystery Azalea:
                                          Enclosed you will find photos, and soil test from a native azalea discovered by Steve Yeatts. The May blooming plant is low growing, highly stoloniferous and the flower tubes are not sticky to the touch. The leaves are oval and seem to be distinct from R. atlanticum, and R. viscosum types. Photos by: Ron Miller.
                                           Any Ideas??
                                                                                                 Sincerely,
                                                                                                  John Thornton
                                 
                                 
                                 
                                P.S. Photos and soil test results will come in a future e-mail.


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                              • Mike Creel
                                If the plant is white with a yellow blotch and strongly fragrant, and growing in circumneutral soil, it could be Rh. eastmanii. But the stoloniferous habit is
                                Message 15 of 24 , Oct 15, 2005
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                                  If the plant is white with a yellow blotch and
                                  strongly fragrant, and growing in circumneutral soil,
                                  it could be Rh. eastmanii. But the stoloniferous
                                  habit is not consistent with eastmanii. Does it bloom
                                  with leaves FULLY expanded and mature enough not to
                                  wilt if stuck as cuttings or does it bloom with or
                                  before expanding foliage? Has the site been forested,
                                  burned or somehow altered that would cause plants to
                                  appear stoloniferous?

                                  A couple of years ago in Richland County, SC, near
                                  Interstate 20 I found a naturally stooled plant of Rh.
                                  eastmanii where the plant's crown had dropped slightly
                                  below the surface of surround leaf litter and soil.
                                  This caused the production of many "stolons" or really
                                  low branches that then rooted in the surrounding mulch
                                  and soil. This is similar to the old method of
                                  "stooling" an azalea or rhododendron plant.

                                  If it is truly stoloniferous the patch of azaleas
                                  could be one hybrid clone, just one large plant with
                                  exactly the same genetics, like I have seen many
                                  atlanticum patches formed on my family farm.

                                  I look forward to seeing the photos. How do the
                                  dormant flower buds look? Eastmanii bloom buds are
                                  quite diagnostic and distinctive. I grow several
                                  variant forms of eastmanii, including one that
                                  routinely sets multiple buds at stem terminals, has
                                  mor vigor than normal and different shaped leaves,
                                  which I think is a tetraploid form.

                                  Mike Creel
                                  SC, Zone 8A

                                  --- John Thornton <pushepetappagdns@...> wrote:

                                  > Mystery Azalea:
                                  > Enclosed you will find photos, and soil
                                  > test from a native azalea discovered by Steve
                                  > Yeatts. The May blooming plant is low growing,
                                  > highly stoloniferous and the flower tubes are not
                                  > sticky to the touch. The leaves are oval and seem to
                                  > be distinct from R. atlanticum, and R. viscosum
                                  > types. Photos by: Ron Miller.
                                  > Any Ideas??
                                  >
                                  > Sincerely,
                                  >
                                  > John Thornton
                                  >
                                  >
                                  >
                                  > P.S. Photos and soil test results will come in a
                                  > future e-mail.
                                  >
                                  >
                                  >
                                  >
                                  >
                                  >
                                  >
                                  > ---------------------------------
                                  > Yahoo! Music Unlimited - Access over 1 million
                                  > songs. Try it free.





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                                • Katie and Dave
                                  This is from the ASK US page, so please send me a CC We need to replace this azalea; any guesses what kind it is? It grew in Portland OR, USDA hardiness zone
                                  Message 16 of 24 , Jul 23, 2006
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                                    This is from the ASK US page, so please send me a CC

                                    We need to replace this azalea; any guesses what kind it is? It grew in
                                    Portland OR, USDA hardiness zone 8, against the north side of the house.
                                    It was an evergreen variety, and had been in the ground at least 20
                                    years. Done in by clumsy home remodeling contractors. Thanks!
                                  • Bill Pinkerton
                                    In my opinion, your mystery azalea is the Glenn Dale az. Pixie - many varieties of Glenn Dale azaleas were shipped to growers in that area years ago
                                    Message 17 of 24 , Jul 23, 2006
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                                       In my opinion, your mystery azalea  is  the Glenn Dale  az. "Pixie"- many varieties of Glenn Dale  azaleas  were shipped   to growers  in that  area  years ago  when the initial distribution  of the Glenn Dale  azalea collection was released-     Bill Pinkerton
                                                            Crossville Tn.  zone 5b(occasionally)
                                       
                                      -------Original Message-------
                                       
                                      Date: 07/23/06 20:59:54
                                      Subject: [AZ] Mystery Azalea
                                       

                                      This is from the ASK US page, so please send me a CC

                                      We need to replace this azalea; any guesses what kind it is? It grew in
                                      Portland OR, USDA hardiness zone 8, against the north side of the house.
                                      It was an evergreen variety, and had been in the ground at least 20
                                      years. Done in by clumsy home remodeling contractors. Thanks!

                                       
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                                    • Buck Clagett
                                      Kate and Dave The azalea in question is a good color match for Pixie but my guess is that if you have other azaleas of this type to match that the bloom times
                                      Message 18 of 24 , Jul 29, 2006
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                                        Kate and Dave
                                         
                                        The azalea in question is a good color match for Pixie but my guess is that if you have other azaleas of this type to match that the bloom times are going to be considerably different. That much new growth around  the blooms, at least in zone 6b/7a usually indicates that an azalea is a later blooming azalea. When Pixie blooms it displays          virtually no new growth because it is a very early bloomer.
                                        I'm sending along a couple of pics so you can compare.
                                         
                                        Buck Clagett
                                        Derwood, Md
                                         
                                         
                                         
                                         
                                        ----- Original Message -----
                                        Sent: Sunday, July 23, 2006 8:33 PM
                                        Subject: [AZ] Mystery Azalea

                                        This is from the ASK US page, so please send me a CC

                                        We need to replace this azalea; any guesses what kind it is? It grew in
                                        Portland OR, USDA hardiness zone 8, against the north side of the house.
                                        It was an evergreen variety, and had been in the ground at least 20
                                        years. Done in by clumsy home remodeling contractors. Thanks!


                                      • Bill Pinkerton
                                        Buck--- the three images you presented to help identify the mystery azalea: the very early blooming sparce new growth blooming azalea ,one image showing a
                                        Message 19 of 24 , Jul 29, 2006
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                                          Buck--- the three images  you presented to help identify the mystery azalea: the very early blooming sparce new growth blooming azalea ,one  image  showing  a solid  red sport  and one image  with the same  flower,no sport(same plant?)in my opinion , is  Pied Piper  -the  #2 jpg.more white ground  and  more open-faced  looks like Pixie and  blooms  a little later than Pied Piper--just thought I'd put in  2 cents worth of opinion!
                                           
                                          Bill Pinkerton
                                          Crossville, Tn
                                           
                                          -------Original Message-------
                                           
                                          Date: 07/29/06 21:49:03
                                          Subject: Re: [AZ] Mystery Azalea
                                           

                                           
                                          Kate and Dave
                                           
                                          The azalea in question is a good color match for Pixie but my guess is that if you have other azaleas of this type to match that the bloom times are going to be considerably different. That much new growth around  the blooms, at least in zone 6b/7a usually indicates that an azalea is a later blooming azalea. When Pixie blooms it displays          virtually no new growth because it is a very early bloomer.
                                          I'm sending along a couple of pics so you can compare.
                                           
                                          Buck Clagett
                                          Derwood, Md
                                           
                                           
                                           
                                           
                                          ----- Original Message -----
                                          Sent: Sunday, July 23, 2006 8:33 PM
                                          Subject: [AZ] Mystery Azalea

                                          This is from the ASK US page, so please send me a CC

                                          We need to replace this azalea; any guesses what kind it is? It grew in
                                          Portland OR, USDA hardiness zone 8, against the north side of the house.
                                          It was an evergreen variety, and had been in the ground at least 20
                                          years. Done in by clumsy home remodeling contractors. Thanks!


                                           
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