Loading ...
Sorry, an error occurred while loading the content.

Re: [AZ] (unknown)

Expand Messages
  • Nicholas Yarmoshuk
    The photo show an evergreen azalea. Anyone know how a deciduous azalea would respond to such treatment Nick Yarmoshuk St.Catharines, ON Canada Where today the
    Message 1 of 10 , Mar 7, 2009
    • 0 Attachment
      The photo show an evergreen azalea.
      Anyone know how a deciduous azalea would respond to such treatment
      Nick Yarmoshuk
      St.Catharines, ON Canada
      Where today the temp is about 14C.(around 57F)

      On Sat, Mar 7, 2009 at 6:44 AM, JO Thornton <jimpatsy@...> wrote:

      

      Sue from La.
      I agree with Michael. Wait til they bloom and get out your chainsaw.
       The attached shows an az cut back last April and being Xplanted in the fall . Notice the size of the trunk........these guys were huge!
      They rec'd no special treatment after being whacked down.
       
      Jim Thornton
       
       
       
       
       
      ----- Original Message -----
      Sent: Saturday, March 07, 2009 12:06 AM
      Subject: Re: [AZ] (unknown)

      Cut them down to the ground with a chainsaw and watch them come back better than ever.  You might want to wait for a few others to chime in before you do something like that though.
      ----- Original Message -----
      From: shansfor@...
      To: azaleas@yahoogroups.com
      Sent: Friday, March 6, 2009 9:15:00 PM GMT -06:00 US/Canada Central
      Subject: [AZ] (unknown)

      I have several older, very large bushes in front of my house that do not bloom well in the spring and are extremely too large.  I want to know how far I can cut them back.  I don't mind if they look like "sticks" for the year.  They are simply too high.  I would greatly appreciate your help.  Sue from Louisiana


    • Tom Schuetz
      My experience with both azaleas and rhododendron is that they can be harshly pruned but the timing is critical. Yes, it is useful to let bloom occur but
      Message 2 of 10 , Mar 7, 2009
      • 0 Attachment
        My experience with both azaleas and rhododendron is that they can be harshly pruned but the timing is critical. Yes, it is useful to let bloom occur but another way to look at it is that pruning should be done before new growth begins. I have never had a problem with this timing. However, if new growth is underway (say July), successful regrowth may drop to 50 %.
        Tom Schuetz
        schuetz101@...
        Mechanicsburg, PA   USDA Zone 6a
        ----- Original Message -----
        Sent: Saturday, March 07, 2009 11:20 AM
        Subject: Re: [AZ] (unknown)

        Tyler Arboretum did this. Only the healthy ones with good sun exposure
        came back. Those in shade or that were struggling died. So, even
        though some people do this and succeed, it doesn't always work.

        This method was started by people who cut the tops off wild azalea and
        moved them into their yards. In those cases the plants were growing in
        nature in areas they loved and it usually was successful.

        A more prudent course of action is to remove any extremely large
        branches if there are smaller younger branches coming out below them.
        Next, prune the top back to the height you want or slightly lower.

        Then in future years you can cut back about 1/3 of the plant until you
        get it where you want it.

        If you prune now you will be removing flower buds. Azaleas form their
        flower buds in the summer. It is best to prune immediately after they
        finish blooming so you don't loose the next season's bloom.

        Good Luck,

        Steve Henning
        http://rhodyman. net/rasite. html

        --- michael.campbell3@ ... wrote:
        >
        > Cut them down to the ground with a chainsaw and watch them come back
        better than ever. You might want to wait for a few others to chime in
        before you do something like that though.
        >----- shansfor@... wrote:
        >
        > I have several older, very large bushes in front of my house that do
        not bloom well in the spring and are extremely too large. I want to know
        how far I can cut them back. I don't mind if they look like "sticks" for
        the year. They are simply too high. I would greatly appreciate your
        help. Sue from Louisiana
        >

      • Mark R. Wright
        Cindy, I think all will agree deer will eat most azaleas any time of the year! Mark -----Original Message----- From: cindy cornell Sent: May 10, 2010 11:21 AM
        Message 3 of 10 , May 10, 2010
        • 0 Attachment
          Cindy, I think all will agree deer will eat most azaleas any time of the year!
          Mark


          -----Original Message-----
          From: cindy cornell
          Sent: May 10, 2010 11:21 AM
          To: azaleas@yahoogroups.com
          Subject: [AZ] (unknown)

           

          this is from the Ask Us  page, so please send me a cc.
          I wanted to know if deer will eat azalea's in summer or winter.

        • Nicholas Yarmoshuk
          But especially when the deer are hungry and have no other source of food. Nick Yarmoshuk
          Message 4 of 10 , May 10, 2010
          • 0 Attachment
            But especially when the deer are hungry and have no other source of food.
            Nick Yarmoshuk

            On Mon, May 10, 2010 at 8:30 PM, Mark R. Wright <onerhodie@...> wrote:
             

            Cindy, I think all will agree deer will eat most azaleas any time of the year!
            Mark




            -----Original Message-----
            From: cindy cornell
            Sent: May 10, 2010 11:21 AM
            To: azaleas@yahoogroups.com
            Subject: [AZ] (unknown)

             

            this is from the Ask Us  page, so please send me a cc.
            I wanted to know if deer will eat azalea's in summer or winter.


          • Harold Greer
            Earl, It is often easier to say what a plant is not than what it is. It is not Red Wing or Red Wings as it is sometimes known. Red Wing has a large
            Message 5 of 10 , Jun 25, 2010

            Earl,

             

            It is often easier to say what a plant is not than what it is.  It is not ‘Red Wing’ or ‘Red Wings’ as it is sometimes known.  ‘Red Wing’ has a large calyx making it almost hose-in-hose, but it is not double as shown in Leon ’s pictures.  I don’t know the plant ‘Red Slipper’, so you might be right there.

             

            Harold Greer

             


            From: azaleas@yahoogroups.com [mailto: azaleas@yahoogroups.com ] On Behalf Of Earl Sommerville
            Sent: Friday, June 25, 2010 7:55 AM
            To: azaleas@yahoogroups.com
            Subject: RE: [AZ] (unknown)

             

             

            Leon,

             

            I have two Azaleas that it could be; Red Slipper  and Red Wing.

             

            Earl Sommerville

             

            From: azaleas@yahoogroups .com [mailto: azaleas@ yahoogroups. com ] On Behalf Of Buck Clagett
            Sent: Thursday, June 24, 2010 10:49 PM
            To: azaleas@yahoogroups .com
            Cc: ld10753@sbcglobal. net
            Subject: Re: [AZ] (unknown)

             

             

            Leon,

            For what its worth.There is one known azalea similar to photo's that I have seen for sale in the central Md. area from time to time as a potted azalea( Florist type) . It's name is Red Slipper. I had it for a very short time many years ago. It was just to tender to grow in my zone. I have seen it since then at least twice as a florist type.  A lady in my office brought one to work with her. It's one of the Back Acres so I'm sure some of the folks down south that grow this plant  could give you a better idea about whether it is or isn't.

             

            Buck Clagett,

            Derwood, Md

             

             

             

            achment(s) from LEON DOUGLAS SCHOOLER included below]

            I have attached 2 photos of an Azalea. Can anyone tell me what variety it is and what light conditions it requires. It was given to me and there was no planting information with it.

             

            Thank you,

             

            Doug

          • Bob Stelloh
            don t go there -- I fear Tad s address book has been hijacked by a virus, as this is a Canadian pharmacy. Bob Stelloh
            Message 6 of 10 , Jan 31, 2012
            • 0 Attachment
              don't go there -- I fear Tad's address book has been hijacked by a
              virus, as this is a Canadian pharmacy.
              Bob Stelloh

              On Jan 31, 2012, at 3:26 AM, Tadeusz Dauksza wrote:

              >
              >
              > http://www.babyb.ro/site.php?base138.jpeg
              >
              >
              >
            Your message has been successfully submitted and would be delivered to recipients shortly.