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Re: [AZ] fertilizer for azalea in Kansas?

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  • William C. Miller III
    Bob et al, Autumn Monarch (TM) is the trademark name for the cultivar Conleo . On another matter --- no one ventured a guess to my earlier question --- how do
    Message 1 of 15 , Oct 7, 2008
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      Bob et al,

      Autumn Monarch (TM) is the trademark name for the cultivar 'Conleo'.

      On another matter --- no one ventured a guess to my earlier question --- how do the Encore(R) azaleas manage to go dormant and avoid bark split?

      Bill

      Bob Kelly wrote:

      Mike, I think what Kimberly has is the Encore 'Autumn Monarch', which is why it is in bloom.  Kansas may be too far north for  Encores, but I'm glad to see them tested there.
       
      Bob Kelly
       
      ----- Original Message -----
      Sent: Tuesday, October 07, 2008 3:31 PM
      Subject: Re: [AZ] fertilizer for azalea in Kansas?

      Kimberly, the larger and more important question is what is the variety or cultivar name of the azalea you purchased.  If you bought it in bloom at this time of year from a greenhouse, instead of an outdoor nursery, it is highly likely that you purchased a green house variety of azalea (meant to be grown indoors during winter unless you are in Florida) and not a cold-hardy outdoor variety that was bred to be grown in the earth outdoors.  Also, if your are in a zone colder than USDA hardiness zone 7, hardier varieties of azaleas are needed there.
       
      From what you have said thus far, it seems that you might have a greenhouse variety of azalea, which has little chance of surviving outdoors unless you are in the deep South.  Did the seller of the azalea say that your azalea could be planted outdoors?  Did the tag on the azalea state that it should be grown indoors or indoors?
       
      Even if the azalea is a hardy outdoors variety, which seems unlikely, adding fertilizer to the planting hole this late in the season is never adviseable in an area that has freezing temperatures in the winter.
       
      Mike Creel, Lexington, SC

      --- On Tue, 10/7/08, Feldkamp, Kimberly <Kimberly.Feldkamp@ KDA.KS.GOV> wrote:
      From: Feldkamp, Kimberly <Kimberly.Feldkamp@ KDA.KS.GOV>
      Subject: [AZ] fertilizer
      To: "azaleas@yahoogroup s.com" <azaleas@yahoogroups .com>
      Date: Tuesday, October 7, 2008, 11:45 AM

      I just bought and planted a new monarch azalea that is about 15 inches tall.  I put fertilizer in the soil as I was adding dirt behind my new landscaping wall for the azalea.  I just read on your website that you should not fertilizer after July 1 for established plants.  I am new to gardening and wish I would have read your website before putting the dirt in.  Will the fertilizer hurt my new plant?  Do I need to do anything?  The plant was flowering and appeared to be putting on new growth when I bought it from the greenhouse yesterday.
       

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    • Mike Creel
      I can t find where she ever mentioned the name of the azalea she bought, and she said it came from a greenhouse, not a nursery, and was putting on new
      Message 2 of 15 , Oct 7, 2008
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        I can't find where she ever mentioned the name of the azalea she bought, and she said it came from a greenhouse, not a nursery, and was putting on new growth, in addition to blooming.  A previously outdoor-conditioned azalea, even an Encore, would be getting ready for the winter dormant season at this time of year, which my few Encores are here in zone 8A. R. oldhamii 4th of July, a parent of the Encores, just finished blooming here, having been delayed due to the drought here. I surely wouldn't encourage anyone to plant a tender greenhouse azalea outdoors here, certainly in much colder Kansas.  Greenhouse azaleas are like a fish out of water unless in the very deep South. We have already had a low of 42F here.
        Mike Creel, Lexington, SC

        --- On Tue, 10/7/08, Bob Kelly <bkelly66@...> wrote:
        From: Bob Kelly <bkelly66@...>
        Subject: Re: [AZ] fertilizer for azalea in Kansas?
        To: azaleas@yahoogroups.com
        Date: Tuesday, October 7, 2008, 4:40 PM

        Mike, I think what Kimberly has is the Encore 'Autumn Monarch', which is why it is in bloom.  Kansas may be too far north for  Encores, but I'm glad to see them tested there.
         
        Bob Kelly
         
        ----- Original Message -----
        Sent: Tuesday, October 07, 2008 3:31 PM
        Subject: Re: [AZ] fertilizer for azalea in Kansas?

        Kimberly, the larger and more important question is what is the variety or cultivar name of the azalea you purchased.  If you bought it in bloom at this time of year from a greenhouse, instead of an outdoor nursery, it is highly likely that you purchased a green house variety of azalea (meant to be grown indoors during winter unless you are in Florida) and not a cold-hardy outdoor variety that was bred to be grown in the earth outdoors.  Also, if your are in a zone colder than USDA hardiness zone 7, hardier varieties of azaleas are needed there.
         
        From what you have said thus far, it seems that you might have a greenhouse variety of azalea, which has little chance of surviving outdoors unless you are in the deep South.  Did the seller of the azalea say that your azalea could be planted outdoors?  Did the tag on the azalea state that it should be grown indoors or indoors?
         
        Even if the azalea is a hardy outdoors variety, which seems unlikely, adding fertilizer to the planting hole this late in the season is never adviseable in an area that has freezing temperatures in the winter.
         
        Mike Creel, Lexington, SC

        --- On Tue, 10/7/08, Feldkamp, Kimberly <Kimberly.Feldkamp@ KDA.KS.GOV> wrote:
        From: Feldkamp, Kimberly <Kimberly.Feldkamp@ KDA.KS.GOV>
        Subject: [AZ] fertilizer
        To: "azaleas@yahoogroup s.com" <azaleas@yahoogroups .com>
        Date: Tuesday, October 7, 2008, 11:45 AM

        I just bought and planted a new monarch azalea that is about 15 inches tall.  I put fertilizer in the soil as I was adding dirt behind my new landscaping wall for the azalea.  I just read on your website that you should not fertilizer after July 1 for established plants.  I am new to gardening and wish I would have read your website before putting the dirt in.  Will the fertilizer hurt my new plant?  Do I need to do anything?  The plant was flowering and appeared to be putting on new growth when I bought it from the greenhouse yesterday.
         
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      • William C. Miller III
        Mike, Try the first sentence of her posting. There is an Encore(R) azalea with the trademark name Autumn Monarch (TM). Bill ... -- William C. Miller III
        Message 3 of 15 , Oct 7, 2008
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          Mike,

          Try the first sentence of her posting.  There is an Encore(R) azalea with the trademark name Autumn Monarch (TM). 

          Bill

          Mike Creel wrote:

          I can't find where she ever mentioned the name of the azalea she bought, and she said it came from a greenhouse, not a nursery, and was putting on new growth, in addition to blooming.  A previously outdoor-conditioned azalea, even an Encore, would be getting ready for the winter dormant season at this time of year, which my few Encores are here in zone 8A. R. oldhamii 4th of July, a parent of the Encores, just finished blooming here, having been delayed due to the drought here. I surely wouldn't encourage anyone to plant a tender greenhouse azalea outdoors here, certainly in much colder Kansas.  Greenhouse azaleas are like a fish out of water unless in the very deep South. We have already had a low of 42F here.
          Mike Creel, Lexington, SC

          --- On Tue, 10/7/08, Bob Kelly <bkelly66@bellsouth. net> wrote:
          From: Bob Kelly <bkelly66@bellsouth. net>
          Subject: Re: [AZ] fertilizer for azalea in Kansas?
          To: azaleas@yahoogroups .com
          Date: Tuesday, October 7, 2008, 4:40 PM

          Mike, I think what Kimberly has is the Encore 'Autumn Monarch', which is why it is in bloom.  Kansas may be too far north for  Encores, but I'm glad to see them tested there.
           
          Bob Kelly
           
          ----- Original Message -----
          Sent: Tuesday, October 07, 2008 3:31 PM
          Subject: Re: [AZ] fertilizer for azalea in Kansas?

          Kimberly, the larger and more important question is what is the variety or cultivar name of the azalea you purchased.  If you bought it in bloom at this time of year from a greenhouse, instead of an outdoor nursery, it is highly likely that you purchased a green house variety of azalea (meant to be grown indoors during winter unless you are in Florida) and not a cold-hardy outdoor variety that was bred to be grown in the earth outdoors.  Also, if your are in a zone colder than USDA hardiness zone 7, hardier varieties of azaleas are needed there.
           
          From what you have said thus far, it seems that you might have a greenhouse variety of azalea, which has little chance of surviving outdoors unless you are in the deep South.  Did the seller of the azalea say that your azalea could be planted outdoors?  Did the tag on the azalea state that it should be grown indoors or indoors?
           
          Even if the azalea is a hardy outdoors variety, which seems unlikely, adding fertilizer to the planting hole this late in the season is never adviseable in an area that has freezing temperatures in the winter.
           
          Mike Creel, Lexington, SC

          --- On Tue, 10/7/08, Feldkamp, Kimberly <Kimberly.Feldkamp@ KDA.KS.GOV> wrote:
          From: Feldkamp, Kimberly <Kimberly.Feldkamp@ KDA.KS.GOV>
          Subject: [AZ] fertilizer
          To: "azaleas@yahoogroup s.com" <azaleas@yahoogroups .com>
          Date: Tuesday, October 7, 2008, 11:45 AM

          I just bought and planted a new monarch azalea that is about 15 inches tall.  I put fertilizer in the soil as I was adding dirt behind my new landscaping wall for the azalea.  I just read on your website that you should not fertilizer after July 1 for established plants.  I am new to gardening and wish I would have read your website before putting the dirt in.  Will the fertilizer hurt my new plant?  Do I need to do anything?  The plant was flowering and appeared to be putting on new growth when I bought it from the greenhouse yesterday.
           
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          Checked by AVG - http://www.avg. com 
          Version: 8.0.138 / Virus Database: 270.7.6/1711 - Release Date: 10/6/2008 5:37 PM
                      


          -- 
          William C. Miller III
          Bethesda, Maryland
          www.theazaleaworks.com
          
        • Mike Creel
          Bill, your question below is a good one. How do Encores go dormant and how can bark split be avoided? Another question is When does one prune an azalea that
          Message 4 of 15 , Oct 7, 2008
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            Bill, your question below is a good one. How do Encores go dormant and how can bark split be avoided? Another question is When does one prune an azalea that blooms 2 or three times a year? Timing the pruning of plumleaf azalea, which blooms with next year's bloom buds present is a related question.

            It seem impossible to prune (for shape) a Plumleaf azalea or any Encore at any time of year without significant loss of bloom buds.

            To avoid bark split on Encores and ensure transition to dormancy, I would suggest no fertilizing or at least only spring fertilizing. Also, don't plant them where there cold tolerance is marginal or challenged.
            I personally like azaleas that produce a one-time big show, rather than a few flowers across the entire season. I don't think a flower display two or three times a season is possible with azaleas.

            I did greatly enjoy the October 2006 show of white August to Frost at my friend Paul James' gardem near Roanoke, Virginia. I have a small cutting-grown plant with flowers on it now.

            --- On Tue, 10/7/08, William C. Miller III <bill@...> wrote:

            From: William C. Miller III <bill@...>
            Subject: Re: [AZ] fertilizer for azalea in Kansas?
            To: azaleas@yahoogroups.com
            Date: Tuesday, October 7, 2008, 5:01 PM

            Bob et al,

            Autumn Monarch (TM) is the trademark name for the cultivar 'Conleo'.

            On another matter --- no one ventured a guess to my earlier question --- how do the Encore(R) azaleas manage to go dormant and avoid bark split?

            Bill

            Bob Kelly wrote:


            Mike, I think what Kimberly has is the Encore 'Autumn Monarch', which is why it is in bloom.  Kansas may be too far north for  Encores, but I'm glad to see them tested there.
             
            Bob Kelly
          • Larry Wallace
            Fertilome makes one that is only potassium with a trace for rooting hormone. You absolutely do not want any nitrogen now, or ammonium ever. In the spring
            Message 5 of 15 , Oct 8, 2008
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              Fertilome makes one that is only potassium with a trace for rooting hormone.  You absolutely do not want any nitrogen now, or ammonium ever.  In the spring maybe a "soft fertilizer" id est no ammonium.


              --
              Larry Wallace
              Cincinnati
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