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Re: [AZ] Azalea Society

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  • Susane Brown, REMAX
    Dear Steve and Darlene Where can I find Satsuki type multi-color azaleas to buy/plant ? Thank you, Susane Brown Hendersonville, NC ... From: Steve & Darlene
    Message 1 of 10 , Sep 17, 2008
    • 0 Attachment
      Dear Steve and Darlene
      Where can I find Satsuki type multi-color azaleas to buy/plant ?

      Thank you,
      Susane Brown
      Hendersonville, NC

      --- On Tue, 9/16/08, Steve & Darlene Henning <rhodyman@...> wrote:
      From: Steve & Darlene Henning <rhodyman@...>
      Subject: Re: [AZ] Azalea Society
      To: azaleas@yahoogroups.com
      Date: Tuesday, September 16, 2008, 10:23 AM

      To expand a little on what Harold said, the Japanese prized this
      natural variability in the flowers and bred the Satsuki azaleas to
      bring this characteristic out.

      The Satsuki azaleas are late blooming azaleas from Japan with highly
      variable flower colors. In Japanese, Satsuki means fifth month of the
      Japanese lunar calendar (June). So plants bloom late (May, June and
      July), when most other azaleas are no longer blooming.

      Single, hose-in-hose and double flower forms are available. Flower
      size ranges from less than 1 inch to more than 5 inches across. Flower
      patterns include solids, stripes, multicolored sections, colored rings
      or margins, speckles and combinations of these. Many cultivars have
      variations of flower color and patterns on the same plant. They
      typically exhibit sporting a characteristic where the flowers are
      composed of two colors and no two flowers are exactly the same except
      those that are all one of the two colors. Most Satsukis have flowers
      that will be predominantly one color with blotches of the other color.

      Satsukis vary in hardiness but most are not very hardy. The hardiest
      are hardy to -10F and some are only hardy to +30F. Since they bloom
      fairly late, it is best to plant in partial shade.

      The Gumpo azaleas are popular Satsuki azaleas in the US. Popular
      cultivars include ´Pink Gumpo´, single, light-pink ruffled flowers;
      ´White Gumpo´, single, white flowers with small flecks of purplish
      pink and a light-green blotch; and ´Wakaebisu´, deep yellow-pink
      flowers with rounded petals, hose-in-hose form.

      Cross pollination creates variation in the seed produced but not the
      flowers that contains this seed. To see this variation you must grow
      the seed and see what flowers it produces. This is the hybridization
      process that is used to create new plants, hopefully to combine the
      best characteristics of both plants.

      --- In azaleas@yahoogroups.com, "Harold Greer" <hgreer@...>
      wrote:
      >
      > You have a Satsuki type azalea and flowers with more than one color are
      > VERY common. Some flowers are one solid color and others are
      > multicolored. No, the azaleas are not cross-pollinating, and a little
      > plant sex education might be in order. You have a plant to enjoy, but
      > it is not uncommon at all.
      >
      >
      >
      > Harold Greer
      >
      >
      >
      > ________________________________
      >
      > From: azaleas@yahoogroups.com [mailto:azaleas@yahoogroups.com] On Behalf
      > Of April Adare
      > Sent: Monday, September 15, 2008 7:54 PM
      > To: azaleas@yahoogroups.com
      > Subject: [AZ] Azalea Society
      >
      >
      >
      > I found this e-mail on the Ask Me page of your group site. Our Azaleas
      > in my front yard have been cross-pollinating over the last couple of
      > years. While we have seen some interesting mixes, this one took the
      > cake. I wanted to share since I've never seen such a thing and those
      > I've shown haven't either.
      >
      > When the bloom ran its course, I plucked and pressed it.
      >
      > Enjoy!
      >
      > April Williams
      > Pensacola, FL
      >



      ------------------------------------

      When you reply to an email, PLEASE quote its relevant part(s) only, as context,
      and DELETE the rest - especially this line and the Yahoo lines. And PLEASE tell
      us your city, state and/or USDA zone.

      We welcome attached images RESIZED to be under 100KB in size - 640 x 480 pixel
      JPEG images at 50% or 1:40 compression are ideal. By attaching them you agree
      that, without giving up your rights to them, they may be shown on Azalea Society
      websites.

      To unsubscribe, send an email to: azaleas-unsubscribe@yahoogroups.com

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    • George Klump
      17 September 2008 Susan, One of the largest collections of Satsuki azaleas and one of the most knowledgeable men in the field on that subject may be found at
      Message 2 of 10 , Sep 17, 2008
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        17 September 2008

        Susan,


        One of the largest collections of Satsuki azaleas and one of the most knowledgeable men in the field on that subject may be found at Nuccio's Nurseries, 3555 Chaney Trail, Altadena, California 91001, (626) 794-3383.  They will ship anything you wish in the way of Satsuki's.  Call them and ask for Tom Nuccio.  You may use my name to him.  I have many of them in my garden where they bloom most of the year.  As Harold Greer has already pointed out, they have multiple colors on one plant.  While many tend to come from a basic white, not all do.  In any case, flowers may have stripes or are shaded from the throat out, e.g. from white to red or pink or purple or combinations of colors.  And some are solid, too.  Good examples are Shinsen, Haru-no-sono #3 and Yamato-no-Hikari.

        George Klump
        Southern California  Chapter, ARS/ASA



        Susane Brown, REMAX wrote:

        Dear Steve and Darlene
        Where can I find Satsuki type multi-color azaleas to buy/plant ?

        Thank you,
        Susane Brown
        Hendersonville, NC

        --- On Tue, 9/16/08, Steve & Darlene Henning <rhodyman@earthlink. net> wrote:
        From: Steve & Darlene Henning <rhodyman@earthlink. net>
        Subject: Re: [AZ] Azalea Society
        To: azaleas@yahoogroups .com
        Date: Tuesday, September 16, 2008, 10:23 AM

        To expand a little on what Harold said, the Japanese prized this
        natural variability in the flowers and bred the Satsuki azaleas to
        bring this characteristic out.  
        
        The Satsuki azaleas are late blooming azaleas from Japan with highly
        variable flower colors. In Japanese, Satsuki means fifth month of
         the
        Japanese lunar calendar (June). So plants bloom late (May, June and
        July), when most other azaleas are no longer blooming. 
        
        Single, hose-in-hose and double flower forms are available. Flower
        size ranges from less than 1 inch to more than 5 inches across. Flower
        patterns include solids, stripes, multicolored sections, colored rings
        or margins, speckles and combinations of these. Many cultivars have
        variations of flower color and patterns on the same plant. They
        typically exhibit sporting a characteristic where the flowers are
        composed of two colors and no two flowers are exactly the same except
        those that are all one of the two colors. Most Satsukis have flowers
        that will be predominantly one color with blotches of the other color. 
        
        Satsukis vary in hardiness but most are not very hardy. The hardiest
        are hardy to -10F and some are only hardy to +30F. Since they bloom
        fairly late, it is best to plant
         in partial shade. 
        
        The Gumpo azaleas are popular Satsuki azaleas in the US. Popular
        cultivars include ´Pink Gumpo´, single, light-pink ruffled flowers;
        ´White Gumpo´, single, white flowers with small flecks of purplish
        pink and a light-green blotch; and ´Wakaebisu´, deep yellow-pink
        flowers with rounded petals, hose-in-hose form.
        
        Cross pollination creates variation in the seed produced but not the
        flowers that contains this seed.  To see this variation you must grow
        the seed and see what flowers it produces.  This is the hybridization
        process that is used to create new plants, hopefully to combine the
        best characteristics of both plants.
        
        --- In azaleas@yahoogroups .com, "Harold Greer" <hgreer@...>
        wrote:
        >
        > You have a Satsuki type azalea and flowers with more than one color are
        > VERY common.  Some flowers are one solid color and others are
        > multicolored.  No, the
         azaleas are not cross-pollinating, and a little
        > plant sex education might be in order.  You have a plant to enjoy, but
        > it is not uncommon at all.
        > 
        >  
        > 
        > Harold Greer
        > 
        >  
        > 
        > ____________ _________ _________ __
        > 
        > From: azaleas@yahoogroups .com [mailto:azaleas@ yahoogroups. com] On Behalf
        > Of April Adare
        > Sent: Monday, September 15, 2008 7:54 PM
        > To: azaleas@yahoogroups .com
        > Subject: [AZ] Azalea Society
        > 
        >  
        > 
        > I found this e-mail on the Ask Me page of your group site.  Our Azaleas
        > in my front yard have been cross-pollinating over the last couple of
        > years.  While we have seen some interesting mixes, this one took the
        > cake.  I wanted to share since I've never seen such a thing and those
        > I've shown haven't either.
        > 
        > When the bloom ran its course, I plucked and pressed
         it.
        > 
        > Enjoy!
        > 
        > April Williams
        > Pensacola, FL
        >
        
        
        
        ------------ --------- --------- ------
        
        When you reply to an email, PLEASE quote its relevant part(s) only, as context,
        and DELETE the rest - especially this line and the Yahoo lines.  And PLEASE tell
        us your city, state and/or USDA zone.
        
        We welcome attached images RESIZED to be under 100KB in size - 640 x 480 pixel
        JPEG images at 50% or 1:40 compression are ideal. By attaching them you agree
        that, without giving up your rights to them, they may be shown on Azalea Society
        websites.
        
        To unsubscribe, send an email to: azaleas-unsubscribe @yahoogroups. com
        
        Yahoo! Groups Links
        
        <*> To visit your group on the web, go to:
            http://groups. yahoo.com/ group/azaleas/
        
        <*> Your email settings:
            Individual Email | Traditional
        
        <*> To change settings online go to:
           
         http://groups. yahoo.com/ group/azaleas/ join
            (Yahoo! ID required)
        
        <*> To change settings via email:
            mailto:azaleas- digest@yahoogrou ps.com 
            mailto:azaleas- fullfeatured@ yahoogroups. com
        
        <*> To unsubscribe from this group, send an email to:
            azaleas-unsubscribe @yahoogroups. com
        
        <*> Your use of Yahoo! Groups is subject to:
            http://docs. yahoo.com/ info/terms/
        
                  

      • Susane Brown, REMAX
        Thank you very, very much for this info. I really appreciate it ! Susane Brown azalea lover in Hendersonville, NC ... From: George Klump
        Message 3 of 10 , Sep 19, 2008
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          Thank you very, very much for this info. I really appreciate it !

          Susane Brown
          azalea lover in Hendersonville, NC

          --- On Wed, 9/17/08, George Klump <mixturev@...> wrote:
          From: George Klump <mixturev@...>
          Subject: Re: [AZ] Azalea Society
          To: azaleas@yahoogroups.com
          Date: Wednesday, September 17, 2008, 3:24 PM

          17 September 2008

          Susan,


          One of the largest collections of Satsuki azaleas and one of the most knowledgeable men in the field on that subject may be found at Nuccio's Nurseries, 3555 Chaney Trail, Altadena, California 91001, (626) 794-3383.  They will ship anything you wish in the way of Satsuki's.  Call them and ask for Tom Nuccio.  You may use my name to him.  I have many of them in my garden where they bloom most of the year.  As Harold Greer has already pointed out, they have multiple colors on one plant.  While many tend to come from a basic white, not all do.  In any case, flowers may have stripes or are shaded from the throat out, e.g. from white to red or pink or purple or combinations of colors.  And some are solid, too.  Good examples are Shinsen, Haru-no-sono #3 and Yamato-no-Hikari.

          George Klump
          Southern California  Chapter, ARS/ASA



          Susane Brown, REMAX wrote:

          Dear Steve and Darlene
          Where can I find Satsuki type multi-color azaleas to buy/plant ?

          Thank you,
          Susane Brown
          Hendersonville, NC

          --- On Tue, 9/16/08, Steve & Darlene Henning <rhodyman@earthlink. net> wrote:
          From: Steve & Darlene Henning <rhodyman@earthlink. net>
          Subject: Re: [AZ] Azalea Society
          To: azaleas@yahoogroups .com
          Date: Tuesday, September 16, 2008, 10:23 AM

          To expand a little on what Harold said, the Japanese prized this
          natural variability in the flowers and bred the Satsuki azaleas to
          bring this characteristic out.

          The Satsuki azaleas are late blooming azaleas from Japan with highly
          variable flower colors. In Japanese, Satsuki means fifth month of
          the
          Japanese lunar calendar (June). So plants bloom late (May, June and
          July), when most other azaleas are no longer blooming.

          Single, hose-in-hose and double flower forms are available. Flower
          size ranges from less than 1 inch to more than 5 inches across. Flower
          patterns include solids, stripes, multicolored sections, colored rings
          or margins, speckles and combinations of these. Many cultivars have
          variations of flower color and patterns on the same plant. They
          typically exhibit sporting a characteristic where the flowers are
          composed of two colors and no two flowers are exactly the same except
          those that are all one of the two colors. Most Satsukis have flowers
          that will be predominantly one color with blotches of the other color.

          Satsukis vary in hardiness but most are not very hardy. The hardiest
          are hardy to -10F and some are only hardy to +30F. Since they bloom
          fairly late, it is best to plant
          in partial shade.

          The Gumpo azaleas are popular Satsuki azaleas in the US. Popular
          cultivars include ´Pink Gumpo´, single, light-pink ruffled flowers;
          ´White Gumpo´, single, white flowers with small flecks of purplish
          pink and a light-green blotch; and ´Wakaebisu´, deep yellow-pink
          flowers with rounded petals, hose-in-hose form.

          Cross pollination creates variation in the seed produced but not the
          flowers that contains this seed. To see this variation you must grow
          the seed and see what flowers it produces. This is the hybridization
          process that is used to create new plants, hopefully to combine the
          best characteristics of both plants.

          --- In azaleas@yahoogroups .com, "Harold Greer" <hgreer@...>
          wrote:
          >
          > You have a Satsuki type azalea and flowers with more than one color are
          > VERY common. Some flowers are one solid color and others are
          > multicolored. No, the
          azaleas are not cross-pollinating, and a little
          > plant sex education might be in order. You have a plant to enjoy, but
          > it is not uncommon at all.
          >
          >
          >
          > Harold Greer
          >
          >
          >
          > ____________ _________ _________ __
          >
          > From: azaleas@yahoogroups .com [mailto:azaleas@ yahoogroups. com] On Behalf
          > Of April Adare
          > Sent: Monday, September 15, 2008 7:54 PM
          > To: azaleas@yahoogroups .com
          > Subject: [AZ] Azalea Society
          >
          >
          >
          > I found this e-mail on the Ask Me page of your group site. Our Azaleas
          > in my front yard have been cross-pollinating over the last couple of
          > years. While we have seen some interesting mixes, this one took the
          > cake. I wanted to share since I've never seen such a thing and those
          > I've shown haven't either.
          >
          > When the bloom ran its course, I plucked and pressed
          it.
          >
          > Enjoy!
          >
          > April Williams
          > Pensacola, FL
          >



          ------------ --------- --------- ------

          When you reply to an email, PLEASE quote its relevant part(s) only, as context,
          and DELETE the rest - especially this line and the Yahoo lines. And PLEASE tell
          us your city, state and/or USDA zone.

          We welcome attached images RESIZED to be under 100KB in size - 640 x 480 pixel
          JPEG images at 50% or 1:40 compression are ideal. By attaching them you agree
          that, without giving up your rights to them, they may be shown on Azalea Society
          websites.

          To unsubscribe, send an email to: azaleas-unsubscribe @yahoogroups. com

          Yahoo! Groups Links

          <*> To visit your group on the web, go to:
          http://groups. yahoo.com/ group/azaleas/

          <*> Your email settings:
          Individual Email | Traditional

          <*> To change settings online go to:

          http://groups. yahoo.com/ group/azaleas/ join
          (Yahoo! ID required)

          <*> To change settings via email:
          mailto:azaleas- digest@yahoogrou ps.com
          mailto:azaleas- fullfeatured@ yahoogroups. com

          <*> To unsubscribe from this group, send an email to:
          azaleas-unsubscribe @yahoogroups. com

          <*> Your use of Yahoo! Groups is subject to:
          http://docs. yahoo.com/ info/terms/

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