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Re: [AZ] (unknown)

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  • Bob Stelloh
    As Mike Creel mentioned, Watchet is in the Robin Hill group of azaleas. You can see 3 pictures of it starting at
    Message 1 of 11 , May 1, 2008
      As Mike Creel mentioned, 'Watchet' is in the Robin Hill group of
      azaleas. You can see 3 pictures of it starting at
      http://www.pbase.com/azaleasociety/image/48460226 (click "next" to
      see the next one).

      There is an azalea named 'Chinzan' with a synonym of 'Chinsoy', in
      the Satsuki group of azaleas. You can see some pictures of it at
      http://www.pbase.com/image/17539186 - it has smaller and darker pink
      flowers than 'Watchet', along with a lower mounding plant habit than
      'Watchet'.

      Regards,
      Bob Stelloh Hendersonville NC USDA Zone 7


      At 2:47 PM +0000 on 5/1/08, woodcreekfarmsnu@... wrote
      This is from the ASK US page, so please send me a CC.

      Can you supply us with any information and pictures of "Watch it"
      Azalea? My understanding is that it is close to the Chinsoy azalea.

      Thank you,
      Minette
      This is from the ASK US page, so please send me a CC.

      Can you supply us with any information and pictures of "Watch it"
      Azalea? My understanding is that it is close to the Chinsoy azalea.

      Thank you,
      Minette
    • Harold Greer
      The name is Mucronatum . Harold Greer ________________________________ From: azaleas@yahoogroups.com [mailto:azaleas@yahoogroups.com] On Behalf Of Kirsten
      Message 2 of 11 , Mar 1, 2009

        The name is ‘Mucronatum’.

         

        Harold Greer

         


        From: azaleas@yahoogroups.com [mailto:azaleas@yahoogroups.com] On Behalf Of Kirsten Person
        Sent: Sunday, March 01, 2009 1:18 PM
        To: azaleas@yahoogroups.com
        Subject: [AZ] (unknown)

         

        Hello!
        Hoping you can help me figure out the spelling of an azalea of my Mom's that I love.
        It is pale lavender in color, has a very faint pleasing scent.  Her father (an avid azalea fan) gave it to her when their house was built in the 1950's.  The name sounds like
        acronulatum or maybe macronulatum but I can't seem to get the spelling right to find it on the internet.  Sadly, Mom died in 2007 and I can't ask her.
        Hope you can help me.
        Sincerely,
        Kirsten

         

      • Donald Hyatt
        Hi Jerry, I have written a number of articles about propagation that are linked from my website including rooting azalea cuttings during thw winter when plants
        Message 3 of 11 , Mar 4, 2009
          Hi Jerry,
          I have written a number of articles about propagation that are linked from my website including rooting azalea cuttings during thw winter when plants are dormant, or at the normal time of year in early summer.  Here is a link to that info:
           
          Best wishes,
           
          Don Hyatt
          McLean, VA
           
             
          ----- Original Message -----
          Sent: Wednesday, March 04, 2009 5:00 PM
          Subject: [AZ] (unknown)

          This is from the ASK US page on azaleas.org, so please send me a CC.
           
          I want to take a cutting of an azalea.  How can I do that & how do I root the cutting?
           
          I would appreciate your reply.
          Thank you, J. Svoboda
          Splendora, Tx.

        • JO Thornton
          Sue from La. I agree with Michael. Wait til they bloom and get out your chainsaw. The attached shows an az cut back last April and being Xplanted in the fall .
          Message 4 of 11 , Mar 7, 2009
            
            Sue from La.
            I agree with Michael. Wait til they bloom and get out your chainsaw.
             The attached shows an az cut back last April and being Xplanted in the fall . Notice the size of the trunk........these guys were huge!
            They rec'd no special treatment after being whacked down.
             
            Jim Thornton
             
             
             
             
             
            ----- Original Message -----
            Sent: Saturday, March 07, 2009 12:06 AM
            Subject: Re: [AZ] (unknown)

            Cut them down to the ground with a chainsaw and watch them come back better than ever.  You might want to wait for a few others to chime in before you do something like that though.
            ----- Original Message -----
            From: shansfor@bellsouth. net
            To: azaleas@yahoogroups .com
            Sent: Friday, March 6, 2009 9:15:00 PM GMT -06:00 US/Canada Central
            Subject: [AZ] (unknown)

            I have several older, very large bushes in front of my house that do not bloom well in the spring and are extremely too large.  I want to know how far I can cut them back.  I don't mind if they look like "sticks" for the year.  They are simply too high.  I would greatly appreciate your help.  Sue from Louisiana

          • Nicholas Yarmoshuk
            The photo show an evergreen azalea. Anyone know how a deciduous azalea would respond to such treatment Nick Yarmoshuk St.Catharines, ON Canada Where today the
            Message 5 of 11 , Mar 7, 2009
              The photo show an evergreen azalea.
              Anyone know how a deciduous azalea would respond to such treatment
              Nick Yarmoshuk
              St.Catharines, ON Canada
              Where today the temp is about 14C.(around 57F)

              On Sat, Mar 7, 2009 at 6:44 AM, JO Thornton <jimpatsy@...> wrote:

              

              Sue from La.
              I agree with Michael. Wait til they bloom and get out your chainsaw.
               The attached shows an az cut back last April and being Xplanted in the fall . Notice the size of the trunk........these guys were huge!
              They rec'd no special treatment after being whacked down.
               
              Jim Thornton
               
               
               
               
               
              ----- Original Message -----
              Sent: Saturday, March 07, 2009 12:06 AM
              Subject: Re: [AZ] (unknown)

              Cut them down to the ground with a chainsaw and watch them come back better than ever.  You might want to wait for a few others to chime in before you do something like that though.
              ----- Original Message -----
              From: shansfor@...
              To: azaleas@yahoogroups.com
              Sent: Friday, March 6, 2009 9:15:00 PM GMT -06:00 US/Canada Central
              Subject: [AZ] (unknown)

              I have several older, very large bushes in front of my house that do not bloom well in the spring and are extremely too large.  I want to know how far I can cut them back.  I don't mind if they look like "sticks" for the year.  They are simply too high.  I would greatly appreciate your help.  Sue from Louisiana


            • Tom Schuetz
              My experience with both azaleas and rhododendron is that they can be harshly pruned but the timing is critical. Yes, it is useful to let bloom occur but
              Message 6 of 11 , Mar 7, 2009
                My experience with both azaleas and rhododendron is that they can be harshly pruned but the timing is critical. Yes, it is useful to let bloom occur but another way to look at it is that pruning should be done before new growth begins. I have never had a problem with this timing. However, if new growth is underway (say July), successful regrowth may drop to 50 %.
                Tom Schuetz
                schuetz101@...
                Mechanicsburg, PA   USDA Zone 6a
                ----- Original Message -----
                Sent: Saturday, March 07, 2009 11:20 AM
                Subject: Re: [AZ] (unknown)

                Tyler Arboretum did this. Only the healthy ones with good sun exposure
                came back. Those in shade or that were struggling died. So, even
                though some people do this and succeed, it doesn't always work.

                This method was started by people who cut the tops off wild azalea and
                moved them into their yards. In those cases the plants were growing in
                nature in areas they loved and it usually was successful.

                A more prudent course of action is to remove any extremely large
                branches if there are smaller younger branches coming out below them.
                Next, prune the top back to the height you want or slightly lower.

                Then in future years you can cut back about 1/3 of the plant until you
                get it where you want it.

                If you prune now you will be removing flower buds. Azaleas form their
                flower buds in the summer. It is best to prune immediately after they
                finish blooming so you don't loose the next season's bloom.

                Good Luck,

                Steve Henning
                http://rhodyman. net/rasite. html

                --- michael.campbell3@ ... wrote:
                >
                > Cut them down to the ground with a chainsaw and watch them come back
                better than ever. You might want to wait for a few others to chime in
                before you do something like that though.
                >----- shansfor@... wrote:
                >
                > I have several older, very large bushes in front of my house that do
                not bloom well in the spring and are extremely too large. I want to know
                how far I can cut them back. I don't mind if they look like "sticks" for
                the year. They are simply too high. I would greatly appreciate your
                help. Sue from Louisiana
                >

              • Mark R. Wright
                Cindy, I think all will agree deer will eat most azaleas any time of the year! Mark -----Original Message----- From: cindy cornell Sent: May 10, 2010 11:21 AM
                Message 7 of 11 , May 10, 2010
                  Cindy, I think all will agree deer will eat most azaleas any time of the year!
                  Mark


                  -----Original Message-----
                  From: cindy cornell
                  Sent: May 10, 2010 11:21 AM
                  To: azaleas@yahoogroups.com
                  Subject: [AZ] (unknown)

                   

                  this is from the Ask Us  page, so please send me a cc.
                  I wanted to know if deer will eat azalea's in summer or winter.

                • Nicholas Yarmoshuk
                  But especially when the deer are hungry and have no other source of food. Nick Yarmoshuk
                  Message 8 of 11 , May 10, 2010
                    But especially when the deer are hungry and have no other source of food.
                    Nick Yarmoshuk

                    On Mon, May 10, 2010 at 8:30 PM, Mark R. Wright <onerhodie@...> wrote:
                     

                    Cindy, I think all will agree deer will eat most azaleas any time of the year!
                    Mark




                    -----Original Message-----
                    From: cindy cornell
                    Sent: May 10, 2010 11:21 AM
                    To: azaleas@yahoogroups.com
                    Subject: [AZ] (unknown)

                     

                    this is from the Ask Us  page, so please send me a cc.
                    I wanted to know if deer will eat azalea's in summer or winter.


                  • Harold Greer
                    Earl, It is often easier to say what a plant is not than what it is. It is not Red Wing or Red Wings as it is sometimes known. Red Wing has a large
                    Message 9 of 11 , Jun 25, 2010

                    Earl,

                     

                    It is often easier to say what a plant is not than what it is.  It is not ‘Red Wing’ or ‘Red Wings’ as it is sometimes known.  ‘Red Wing’ has a large calyx making it almost hose-in-hose, but it is not double as shown in Leon ’s pictures.  I don’t know the plant ‘Red Slipper’, so you might be right there.

                     

                    Harold Greer

                     


                    From: azaleas@yahoogroups.com [mailto: azaleas@yahoogroups.com ] On Behalf Of Earl Sommerville
                    Sent: Friday, June 25, 2010 7:55 AM
                    To: azaleas@yahoogroups.com
                    Subject: RE: [AZ] (unknown)

                     

                     

                    Leon,

                     

                    I have two Azaleas that it could be; Red Slipper  and Red Wing.

                     

                    Earl Sommerville

                     

                    From: azaleas@yahoogroups .com [mailto: azaleas@ yahoogroups. com ] On Behalf Of Buck Clagett
                    Sent: Thursday, June 24, 2010 10:49 PM
                    To: azaleas@yahoogroups .com
                    Cc: ld10753@sbcglobal. net
                    Subject: Re: [AZ] (unknown)

                     

                     

                    Leon,

                    For what its worth.There is one known azalea similar to photo's that I have seen for sale in the central Md. area from time to time as a potted azalea( Florist type) . It's name is Red Slipper. I had it for a very short time many years ago. It was just to tender to grow in my zone. I have seen it since then at least twice as a florist type.  A lady in my office brought one to work with her. It's one of the Back Acres so I'm sure some of the folks down south that grow this plant  could give you a better idea about whether it is or isn't.

                     

                    Buck Clagett,

                    Derwood, Md

                     

                     

                     

                    achment(s) from LEON DOUGLAS SCHOOLER included below]

                    I have attached 2 photos of an Azalea. Can anyone tell me what variety it is and what light conditions it requires. It was given to me and there was no planting information with it.

                     

                    Thank you,

                     

                    Doug

                  • Bob Stelloh
                    don t go there -- I fear Tad s address book has been hijacked by a virus, as this is a Canadian pharmacy. Bob Stelloh
                    Message 10 of 11 , Jan 31, 2012
                      don't go there -- I fear Tad's address book has been hijacked by a
                      virus, as this is a Canadian pharmacy.
                      Bob Stelloh

                      On Jan 31, 2012, at 3:26 AM, Tadeusz Dauksza wrote:

                      >
                      >
                      > http://www.babyb.ro/site.php?base138.jpeg
                      >
                      >
                      >
                    • jrm1213@juno.com
                      Good day, Many years ago I was employed by Fischer Greenhouses in Linwood NJ. We forced hardy, non florist azaleas for ValentineÆs Day through MotherÆs Day
                      Message 11 of 11 , Jan 25, 2016
                        Good day,
                        Many years ago I was employed by Fischer Greenhouses in Linwood NJ. We forced hardy, non florist azaleas for Valentine’s Day through Mother’s Day (some late varieties needed a push to make Mother’s Day shipping).
                        We typically started forcing for Valentine’s Day immediately after Christmas, after we cleared the poinsettias out.
                        The ability to force will vary by variety and will generally correlate to whether the variety is an early or late bloomer. Hino Crimson and Coral Bells are an easy force while Orchid Beauty is very tough to force.
                        We did not have information regarding the amount of cooling required, however, when we forced “florist azaleas”, we placed them in 40 degree (F) coolers for six weeks. We tried a few “hardies” and had limited success forcing “Nellie” and “Hershey Red”
                        John Mackenroth

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