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Re: [AZ] R. colemanii articles

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  • Buddy Lee
    I have crosssed R. colemanii Fountain X Rosey Cheeks (Beasley) with great results.  Very fragrant and vigorous growing.  I m bringing  three of these
    Message 1 of 5 , Apr 30, 2008
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      I have crosssed R. colemanii 'Fountain' X 'Rosey Cheeks' (Beasley) with great results.  Very fragrant and vigorous growing.  I'm bringing  three of these hybrids to the convention in Ashville.  I can grow the now-called new species, R. colemanii without very much difficulty in Southeast Louisiana. I have never been successful growing R. eastmanii.  Plants from a selfed colemanii, white with large gold blotch, have produced extremely nice plants that vary from white to deep pink.  All these seedlings have the gold blotch.

       

      However the most striking trait I find with colemanii is the intense fragrance. 

       

      On another topic, has anyone read the article out of Japan concerning evergreen X deciduous azalea hybrids that have produced evergreen type plants with arborescens type fragrance.  Very interesting.

       

      Looking forward to a great convention this year in Ashville.

       

      Buddy



      ----- Original Message ----
      From: Mike Creel <mikeacreel@...>
      To: azaleas@yahoogroups.com
      Sent: Wednesday, April 30, 2008 6:35:40 PM
      Subject: Re: [AZ] R. colemanii articles

      I am still reading the two articles with great
      interest. I do wish someone had asked me or Dr.
      Charles Horn at Newberry College to provide buds of
      eastmanii for testing. I do not know the provenance
      of eastmanii grown at the RSF. In the early days some
      Dubious eastmanii was distributed.

      As for as fertility and crossability of the new
      species R. colemanii, I would think that individual
      plants are probably self-infertile, as most pure
      native azalea species seem to be; that related plants
      such as siblings are fully fertile in intra-species
      crosses; that any of the tetraploid native azalea
      species (austrinum, calendulaceum, atlanticum and some
      tet occidentale) will hybridize with it; and that
      known tetraploid species or groups like R. luteum, the
      Exbury azaleas, the Dodd austrinum X Exbury group and
      thw Aromi austrinum Exbury group. Colemanii might
      also hybridize with tet evergreen azalea varieties.

      Mike Creel, Lexington, SC

      --- jwillhite@comcast. net wrote:

      > My ARS Journal arrived last night, and I read with
      > interest the two articles on R. colemanii.
      > Congratulations to Steve Yeatts and Ron Miller and
      > the others on the discovery and the articles.
      >
      > The discussion placing the new species with a group
      > of tetraploid azaleas was very interesting, although
      > much of that particular discussion sailed over my
      > head. What should this information mean for the
      > gardener trying incorporate the new species into a
      > garden ? Does it tell you whether the plant can
      > self pollinate? does it tell you which azaleas r.
      > colemanii will cross with, and which it will not
      > cross with?
      >
      > I'd also love to hear from
      Steve or Ron or anyone
      > else with experience how the species performs in the
      > garden, and whether there are superior (for the
      > garden) forms?
      >
      > thanks, looking forward to seeing many of you at the
      > convention.
      >
      > jim willhite
      > west chester, pa



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    • Mike Creel
      From the photos I have seen of outstanding colemanii varieties, I hope that someone takes on the mission of propagating the best ones and making the available
      Message 2 of 5 , May 1, 2008
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        From the photos I have seen of outstanding colemanii
        varieties, I hope that someone takes on the mission of
        propagating the best ones and making the available to
        the few gardeners who prefer natives. There seems to
        be a lot of exceptional colemanii forms without ever
        having to create new forms outside the species.

        I am sorry to hear that Buddy Lee has not been able to
        grow R. eastmanii in southeast Lousiana. Suprisingly
        to me, eastmanii has done well in the hot, humid,
        often dry sandhills of my woods in Lexington County,
        SC, pretty much everywhere I plant it. I usually put
        seashells and pieces of fresh concrete or mortar in
        the mulch area around plants.

        Eastmanii is particularly curious in one respect: it
        is a piedmont species that also ranges well down into
        the coastal plain of South Carolina, often in areas
        with marl limestone. Not that far from our coast is
        the population of eastmanii at Santee State Park near
        Lake Marion.

        Buddy, do you have any idea why your eastmanii plants
        died? Did you start with plants or seeds and where
        did they come from? Seeds from coastal plain sites
        might work better. Did you use normal greenhouse
        methods for growing the seeds? My outdoor seed pots
        with a sprinkle of local azalea humus seem to produce
        a high percentage of seedlings for me.

        My two oldest plants of what is now considered
        colemanii are two 1999 Monroe County seedlings from
        John Thornton, which only now are looking strong
        enough to flower. They are in a drought affected
        site, now receiving better rains.

        Buddy, I cannot comment on colemanii fragrance YET,
        but it will have to be something to equal or exceed
        eastmanii. I have been in the woods with botanists
        and fragrance was how we found eastmanii. In my woods
        with just 4 or so mature plants, the scent is
        inescapable within the 7 acres. Have you visited an
        eastmanii native stand in peak of flower? It is no
        place for those with smell allergies.

        I have all the native azalea species in the ground,
        but have yet to experience the bloom of prinophyllum,
        occidentale or colemanii. Canadense seems to have no
        fragrance, which is odd. Vaseyii has no fragrance I
        an detect. Nor calendulaceum or cumberlandense.

        I wish someone could provide the exact reference for
        the article out of Japan concerning evergreen X
        deciduous azalea hybrids that have produced evergreen
        type plants with arborescens type fragrance. I have a
        few friends in horticulture research over they than
        can probably find it.

        Mike Creel, Lexington, SC

        --- Buddy Lee <robert03asa@...> wrote:

        > I have crosssed R. colemanii 'Fountain' X 'Rosey
        > Cheeks' (Beasley) with great results.  Very fragrant
        > and vigorous growing.  I'm bringing  three of these
        > hybrids to the convention in Ashville.  I can grow
        > the now-called new species, R. colemanii without
        > very much difficulty in Southeast Louisiana. I have
        > never been successful growing R. eastmanii.  Plants
        > from a selfed colemanii, white with large gold
        > blotch, have produced extremely nice plants that
        > vary from white to deep pink.  All these seedlings
        > have the gold blotch.
        >  
        > However the most striking trait I find with
        > colemanii is the intense fragrance. 
        >  
        > On another topic, has anyone read the article out of
        > Japan concerning evergreen X deciduous azalea
        > hybrids that have produced evergreen type plants
        > with arborescens type fragrance.  Very interesting.
        >  
        > Looking forward to a great convention this year in
        > Ashville.
        >  
        > Buddy
        >
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