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19599RE: [AZ] [this is from the ASK US page, so please send me a CC] Is it evergreen?

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  • Thomas Schuetz
    Apr 8, 2014
    • 0 Attachment
      Barry, Not a lot of dieback in azaleas. Rhododendrons are another matter.
      Several have branches which appear to be sacrificed. Some of the tender
      azalea clones (like Pink Ruffles here) have many brown crinkly leaves but I
      do not believe that it is permanently damaged. It does surprisingly well
      here with some protection. There is no Bark split (I believe) because (1) I
      have not fertilized in some time (2) the plants are mature enough that the
      sun (on a suddenly warm day) does not shine on the stem. I live on a shale
      hill and the flooding potential is more toward Philadelphia. Buds have a
      whorl of leaves and appear dormant. Time will tell. Since I cannot predict
      the remainder of spring weather, I cannot predict whether bloom will be late
      or not. It is expected to hit 70 F in a week .


      Tom Schuetz
      schuetz101@...
      USDA Zone 7A (as of 2012)

      -----Original Message-----
      From: azaleas@yahoogroups.com [mailto:azaleas@yahoogroups.com] On Behalf Of
      bsperling
      Sent: Sunday, April 06, 2014 8:54 PM
      To: azaleas@yahoogroups.com
      Subject: Re: [AZ] [this is from the ASK US page, so please send me a CC] Is
      it evergreen?

      Hi Tom,
      Yes, the photos will be interesting but the results of the terrible
      winter at the end of the spring will be interesting, too:
      Has there been a lot of dieback? Bark split? Did all of the precip
      flood some plants so that they died by having their roots in water too long?
      How about bud hardiness? Will there be a poor bloom but good summer
      growth?? Of course the first bloom will be late but will the Satsukis be on
      time, leading to a compressed season?
      A lot to talk about in the coming months.
      Barry


      Thomas Schuetz wrote:
      > Barry, I was going to respond to this but you did such a good job
      > responding I will just comment that this was a hard winter in
      > Pennsylvania for many azaleas. Most of mine are exceptionally thin
      > since the plants (in response to this winter's conditions) had fewer
      > persistent leaves. I tried to take some photos to show the condition
      > but the inside of the plants is still too dark to photograph well.
      >
      > Tom Schuetz
      > schuetz101@...
      > USDA Zone 7A (as of 2012)
      >
      > -----Original Message-----
      > From: azaleas@yahoogroups.com [mailto:azaleas@yahoogroups.com] On
      > Behalf Of bsperling
      > Sent: Sunday, April 06, 2014 8:20 PM
      > To: azaleas@yahoogroups.com; tonypham@...
      > Subject: Re: [AZ] [this is from the ASK US page, so please send me a
      > CC] Is it evergreen?
      >
      > Hi Tony,
      > Deciduous azaleas in PA lose all their leaves in the winter and
      > evergreen ones retain the "persistent" leaves at the end of the stem
      > until the next year, so your first picture is of an evergreen.
      > Morning sun (with afternoon shade) will be the best lighting
      > conditions for them. Plants left out in a lot of sun will have more
      > flowers and shorter stems than ones in more shade, but the insect pest
      > problems will increase, so a plant in full sun is usually not best.
      > I don't know of any azalea that will look like a boxwood in the dead
      > of winter so plant boxwoods where you want that screening and plant
      > azaleas where you want spring flowers. There's a plant for everything
      > but no plant does it all!
      > Good luck and send us a picture of the spring blooms!
      > Barry
      >
      > Tony Pham wrote:
      > > [Attachment(s) <#TopText> from Tony Pham included below] > >
      > Hello, > > We just bought a house in Boothwyn, PA 19061 near DE
      > border and the > house has two azalea bushes.
      > >
      > > They are at the north side of the house and in a corner, so they
      > never > receive sunlight. They have clusters of about 5-7 leaves at
      > the tip > but nothing below that all winter. I want to propagate them
      > to plant > as hedges to create formal garden. I want the hedge to be
      > as thick as > possible all winter. I never see an evergreen azalea,
      > but the foliage > of these bush looks thin.
      > >
      > > So, the questions are:
      > > 1. Are these bushes evergreen azalea or they are deciduous azelea
      > that > retain some leaves thanks to the warmth from the house?
      > > 2. The foliage is so thin on these azalea because it never receive
      > > sunlight? If I plant it in a full sun spot, will the foliage be >
      > thicker?
      > > 2. Is evergreen azalea thick like English boxwood in the winter?
      > >
      > > Attached are a picture of the azalea taken at the same time with
      > the > Japanese maple tree to show when the Japanese maple lost all
      > its > leaves in the winter, the azalea still have some thin foliage.
      > >
      > > Thank you for your help!
      > >
      > > Tony Pham
      > >
      > >
      >
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      When you reply to an email, PLEASE quote its relevant part(s) only, as
      context, and DELETE the rest - especially this line and the Yahoo lines.
      And PLEASE tell us your city, state and/or USDA zone.

      We welcome attached images RESIZED to be under 100KB in size - 640 x 480
      pixel JPEG images at 50% or 1:40 compression are ideal. By attaching them
      you agree that, without giving up your rights to them, they may be shown on
      Azalea Society websites.

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