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Re: [axialflux] hydrogen, Hugh Piggott's axial flux pdf file plans

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  • Dave R
    If the electrolysis process is done using wind energy, it wouldn t be a waste of electricity, it would be free hydrogen/oxygen. Or am I missing something? ...
    Message 1 of 66 , Feb 28, 2011
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      If the electrolysis process is done using wind energy, it wouldn't be a waste of electricity, it would be free hydrogen/oxygen. Or am I missing something?

      --- On Mon, 2/28/11, Joe mijdtr <joeokforme@...> wrote:

      From: Joe mijdtr <joeokforme@...>
      Subject: [axialflux] hydrogen, Hugh Piggott's axial flux pdf file plans
      To: axialflux@yahoogroups.com
      Date: Monday, February 28, 2011, 6:29 PM

       
      hi steve and all, about hydrogen,, i have studied it extensively, and experimented. i have found electrolysis method is a waste of electricity.
      however,, chemical reaction via lye and alum shows promise. messy ( eye protection, eye protection, eye protection!) but "free" hydrogen with a by-product of alumina which has uses in industry.

      also note,,, hydrogen will embrittle metal used to store and dispense it. one can get some pretty serious pressure from the reaction also.

      on Hugh Piggott's subject,, there are plans on the files section that show when i laid it out, the magnets are not on the same radius as the coils. are the coils supposed to be on a larger radius? i thought the magnets are supposed to pass alongside the coils, having both centers of the coil and mags to have the same radius?

      i wonder why it hasn't been noticed before or am i missing something?

      thanks folks,
      peace, love, live and let live,
      joe

      --- In axialflux@yahoogroups.com, "Steve Spence" <sspence@...> wrote:
      >
      > I see two things when I see hydrogen schemes:
      >
      > 1. Someone who slept through science class
      > 2. Someone who hopes others slept through science class
      >


    • Joe mijdtr
      your statement is correct, i concur. thanks for reminding me the neg. terminal produces the H2 the hho i spoke of was in respect of the systems where both +
      Message 66 of 66 , Mar 30, 2011
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        your statement is correct, i concur.

        thanks for reminding me the neg. terminal produces the H2

        the hho i spoke of was in respect of the systems where both + and - are in the same vessle. thanks for the input

        joe

        --- In axialflux@yahoogroups.com, ecomm@... wrote:
        >
        > Both processes produce pure hydrogen. I am not familiar with the lye and
        > alum process, but with electrolysis, the hydrogen bubbles up from the
        > negative electrode and the oxygen from the positive. The water needs to
        > connect both electrodes for the system to work. A device can be arranged
        > such that the electrodes are positioned in their own tube, and the water
        > "connection" made below the bubbling path of the gases. In this way, the
        > hydrogen may be collected and the oxygen vented to the atmosphere if it
        > is surplus to requirements.
        >
        > It is true that the electricity used to run electrolysis could be better
        > used directly for other things, but consider a situation where the
        > battery bank is fully charged, the hot water is already hot from a solar
        > hot water service and there is nothing left to do with surplus wind
        > power but direct it to a dummy load. Would an electrolysis based
        > hydrogen plant not be beneficial as an extra (non-battery) power storage
        > system, assuming it is done safely as with any flammable gas system? I
        > understand that this circumstance may not be likely for a lot of
        > off-grid systems, and for grid tied, one would be better off selling
        > surplus power back to the electricity utility, but it is worth the thought.
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