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  • swizzlenutz
    I ve been thinking about wind power for about two years now and I want to get off the fence and start to make something. I d be happy with 250 watts for my
    Message 1 of 5 , Oct 20, 2009
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      I've been thinking about wind power for about two years now and I want to get off the fence and start to make something. I'd be happy with 250 watts for my first attempt if that's possible and maybe bigger and better in the future as I gain more knowledge. I'm having trouble with the part where the hub is connected to the generator and the generator to the batteries. I've seen several examples but for some reason I can't connect the dots in my mind. I understand that magnet passes copper coils = energy. What I don't get is the particular size magnets and size wire required to make 250w - 500w - 1,000w ect... The loops look simple enough to make but how are they wired together? My blades are going to be either 8 or 10 foot 2x4's and I have a treadmill motor lined up for the generator. How do the magnets, generator and coils all fit together on the hub?!? I guess I'm having a hard time because reading schematics to me is like reading Latin in brail. If schematics are a vital part of this project then how do I learn them? I really want to do this and any help will be greatly appreciated. More detailed pics would be great. Print outs of rotor designs, anything. I eventually want to make a 1,000w up to a 3,000w generator with as much salvaged parts as possible. I've been looking at this stuff for weeks and when I think I have something figured out another design makes me think I'm seeing something wrong. Swizzle
    • Steve Spence
      take a look at the wind turbine pics at http://www.green-trust.org/photoalbum/Wind%20Class/index.html and you will get a better idea of how it goes together.
      Message 2 of 5 , Oct 21, 2009
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        take a look at the wind turbine pics at
        http://www.green-trust.org/photoalbum/Wind%20Class/index.html and you
        will get a better idea of how it goes together. If you don't have Dan's,
        Hugh's, or our build guide, you'll want one or all.

        http://www.green-trust.org/wordpress/2009/05/07/the-woodhengeorg-green-trustorg-diy-wind-turbine/
        http://www.otherpower.com
        http://www.scoraigwind.com/


        Steve Spence
        Renewable energy and self sufficiency
        http://www.green-trust.org
        http://makingthewebwork.blogspot.com/




        swizzlenutz wrote:
        >
        >
        > I've been thinking about wind power for about two years now and I want
        > to get off the fence and start to make something. I'd be happy with 250
        > watts for my first attempt if that's possible and maybe bigger and
        > better in the future as I gain more knowledge. I'm having trouble with
        > the part where the hub is connected to the generator and the generator
        > to the batteries. I've seen several examples but for some reason I can't
        > connect the dots in my mind. I understand that magnet passes copper
        > coils = energy. What I don't get is the particular size magnets and size
        > wire required to make 250w - 500w - 1,000w ect... The loops look simple
        > enough to make but how are they wired together? My blades are going to
        > be either 8 or 10 foot 2x4's and I have a treadmill motor lined up for
        > the generator. How do the magnets, generator and coils all fit together
        > on the hub?!? I guess I'm having a hard time because reading schematics
        > to me is like reading Latin in brail. If schematics are a vital part of
        > this project then how do I learn them? I really want to do this and any
        > help will be greatly appreciated. More detailed pics would be great.
        > Print outs of rotor designs, anything. I eventually want to make a
        > 1,000w up to a 3,000w generator with as much salvaged parts as possible.
        > I've been looking at this stuff for weeks and when I think I have
        > something figured out another design makes me think I'm seeing something
        > wrong. Swizzle
        >
        >
      • Dan Fink
        Hi Swizzle -- Lots of questions! You should probably check out my book Homebrew Wind Power -- any library or bookstore can get it, Amazon has it, and if you
        Message 3 of 5 , Oct 22, 2009
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          Hi Swizzle --

          Lots of questions!
          You should probably check out my book "Homebrew Wind Power" -- any
          library or bookstore can get it, Amazon has it, and if you pull it up
          on Google Book Search, you can access and read their scanned copy for
          free....just punch in your various search terms.
          DAN FINK
        • Dan Fink
          Swizzle -- also, keep in mind that a treadmill motor will only take a 3-4 foot diameter blade set, and only provide 100-200 watts in high winds. More of a
          Message 4 of 5 , Oct 22, 2009
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            Swizzle -- also, keep in mind that a treadmill motor will only take a
            3-4 foot diameter blade set, and only provide 100-200 watts in high
            winds. More of a science fair project than something to power your
            house. A 20-foot diameter turbine is a HUGE underaking -- has to be
            very sturdy, on a very sturdy tower. You are pushing $8k in materials
            alone to build a 20-footer. See our page on that (we've built and
            flown 2 of them, plus dozens of 10-foot diameter turbines):
            http://www.otherpower.com/20page1.html
            As you can see, blades made of 2x4s or 2x6s won't cut it for a turbine that big!
            DAN FINK
          • swizzlenutz
            I will most likely still play around with the treadmill motor just for learning purposes. I can already see that the air coil design has a major advantage with
            Message 5 of 5 , Oct 22, 2009
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              I will most likely still play around with the treadmill motor just for learning purposes. I can already see that the air coil design has a major advantage with no cogging whatsoever. I may just stick with my original plan of an 8 footer out of 2x4's for the purpose of charging a small battery bank but I think a VAWT would be more suitable for my situation. From what I've read though these are not as efficient. I may just build a micro model for learning purposes as well just to help me understand more about what I'm trying to accomplish. Small magnets are cheap and I'm sure I can get a deal on 100 of them. One thing I know won't be in your book is the possibility of stacking 2 alternator on a single turbine, (VAWT, one on bottom, one on top)and wiring them together to a single battery bank. Also instead of epoxy would JB Weld be better or is there something wrong with using JB Weld on the coils? I see that the epoxy has a tendency to melt at higher temps. I'll check out your book on the net and hopefully I'll be able to buy it soon. I can't take the computer to my shed. Thanx for your help and sorry if I seem to be a bit of a pain. I'm just trying to get a little extra heat in here and trying to help my dad to come up with a simple way to reduce his $400 a month light bill in his shop. Swizzle
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