Loading ...
Sorry, an error occurred while loading the content.

Newbie here to the group

Expand Messages
  • brilliantgoldfinger
    I am interested in building a generator of my own, but I am new to all this. I have read otherpower.com s website, pretty much all of it. But I still have a
    Message 1 of 5 , Sep 8, 2006
    View Source
    • 0 Attachment
      I am interested in building a generator of my own, but I am new to
      all this. I have read otherpower.com's website, pretty much all of
      it. But I still have a lot of questions, since I'm not an
      electrician, but I have had some experience in some telephone
      systems, (operating in a -48Volt DC environment). Here are some
      questions:

      1. The more RPM's that the generator turns, produces more voltage/
      or amps? What is the average voltage/ amps produced by a 3 phase
      design spinning at a certain RPM? For example, if the generator is
      turning at about 150 RPM, what output can I expect on average?

      2. At high speeds, how bad is the HEAT produced by the generator?
      Will this cause problems with the generator over time? and what can I
      do to alleviate this problem?

      3. Would capacitors serve at all to STORE the energy? How well do
      they work? Are they too expensive?

      4. If, by chance, the output of the generator is too MUCH for the
      batteries, is there some type of shunt or device to help REGULATE
      how much energy is placed in the batteries?

      5. What size power cable would be best to deliver the energy from
      the generator to the batteries? Say, a 50 Ft. distance? 1/0, 2/0,
      4/0? etc?

      Thanks to you if you have any answers to these newbie questions.
      I will probably have lots more in the future.
    • Steve Spence
      See below: Steve Spence Director, Green Trust http://www.green-trust.org _____ From: axialflux@yahoogroups.com [mailto:axialflux@yahoogroups.com] On Behalf Of
      Message 2 of 5 , Sep 8, 2006
      View Source
      • 0 Attachment

        See below:

         

        Steve Spence

        Director, Green Trust

        http://www.green-trust.org


        From: axialflux@yahoogroups.com [mailto: axialflux@yahoogroups.com ] On Behalf Of brilliantgoldfinger
        Sent: Friday, September 08, 2006 10:50 AM
        To: axialflux@yahoogroups.com
        Subject: [axialflux] Newbie here to the group

         

        I am interested in building a generator of my own, but I am new to
        all this. I have read otherpower.com' s website, pretty much all of
        it. But I still have a lot of questions, since I'm not an
        electrician, but I have had some experience in some telephone
        systems, (operating in a -48 Volt DC environment) . Here are some
        questions:

        1. The more RPM's that the generator turns, produces more voltage/
        or amps? What is the average voltage/ amps produced by a 3 phase
        design spinning at a certain RPM? For example, if the generator is
        turning at about 150 RPM, what output can I expect on average?

        You would have to test this with a calibrated rpm source.

        2. At high speeds, how bad is the HEAT produced by the generator?
        Will this cause problems with the generator over time? and what can I
        do to alleviate this problem?

        It’s a very open design, so heat is not an issue. Air cooling works great.

        3. Would capacitors serve at all to STORE the energy? How well do
        they work? Are they too expensive?

        Expensive, and not applicable to long term storage like batteries. They are for quick discharge applications. Batteries are so much cheaper. You should get 10+ years on a good deep cycle set if you treat them right.

        4. If, by chance, the output of the generator is too MUCH for the
        batteries, is there some type of shunt or device to help REGULATE
        how much energy is placed in the batteries?

        The alternator is usually always too much for the batteries to allow direct connect. A charge controller is a must.

        5. What size power cable would be best to deliver the energy from
        the generator to the batteries? Say, a 50 Ft. distance? 1/0, 2/0,
        4/0? etc?

        There are calculators and tables that will determine wiring size for a given amperage/distance. Depends on the amps you are having to handle.

        Thanks to you if you have any answers to these newbie questions.
        I will probably have lots more in the future.

      • Dan Fink
        Welcome to the group! I ve interspersed some more info after Steve s comments. DAN F http://www.otherpower.com/ ... We use an optical tachometer to check each
        Message 3 of 5 , Sep 9, 2006
        View Source
        • 0 Attachment
          Welcome to the group! I've interspersed some more info after Steve's
          comments. DAN F http://www.otherpower.com/

          On Sat, 2006-09-09 at 07:58 +0000, axialflux@yahoogroups.com wrote:
          > I am interested in building a generator of my own, but I am new to
          > all this. I have read otherpower.com's website, pretty much all of
          > it. But I still have a lot of questions, since I'm not an
          > electrician, but I have had some experience in some telephone
          > systems, (operating in a -48Volt DC environment). Here are some
          > questions:
          >
          > 1. The more RPM's that the generator turns, produces more voltage/
          > or amps? What is the average voltage/ amps produced by a 3 phase
          > design spinning at a certain RPM? For example, if the generator is
          > turning at about 150 RPM, what output can I expect on average?
          >
          > You would have to test this with a calibrated rpm source.
          We use an optical tachometer to check each alternator after assembly. If
          you build a 10-footer with alternator similar to what we discuss here,
          you can expect cut-in at about 150 rpm (with a 12-volt
          turbine)....cut-in is when the turbine output voltage reaches the
          battery bank voltage and charging starts.
          >
          > 2. At high speeds, how bad is the HEAT produced by the generator?
          > Will this cause problems with the generator over time? and what can I
          > do to alleviate this problem?
          >
          > It's a very open design, so heat is not an issue. Air cooling works
          > great.

          Yep, not a problem -- *unless* something is preventing the turbine from
          furling or if you open up the airgap too much. As the output (and heat)
          in the stator increases, the wind speed is increasing too, for more
          cooling.
          >
          > 3. Would capacitors serve at all to STORE the energy? How well do
          > they work? Are they too expensive?
          >
          > Expensive, and not applicable to long term storage like batteries.
          > They are
          > for quick discharge applications. Batteries are so much cheaper. You
          > should
          > get 10+ years on a good deep cycle set if you treat them right.
          Yep!

          >
          > 4. If, by chance, the output of the generator is too MUCH for the
          > batteries, is there some type of shunt or device to help REGULATE
          > how much energy is placed in the batteries?
          >
          > The alternator is usually always too much for the batteries to allow
          > direct
          > connect. A charge controller is a must.
          And, the charge controller is different type than a standard solar panel
          controller. It has to divert power to a dump load (heating elements)
          when the batteries fill, because the wind turbine must *always* remain
          loaded. Some commercial controllers (Trace C-40 and C-60 for example)
          have a dump load setting and work out of the box for a wind turbine;
          just add water or air heating elements.
          >
          > 5. What size power cable would be best to deliver the energy from
          > the generator to the batteries? Say, a 50 Ft. distance? 1/0, 2/0,
          > 4/0? etc?
          >
          > There are calculators and tables that will determine wiring size for a
          > given
          > amperage/distance. Depends on the amps you are having to handle.

          You can go a little thinner than usual with a wind turbine, they don't
          mind a 'spongy' line...it does make them spin faster. Since most of your
          output is at low wind speeds and low power, there's little loss. At
          higher outputs, you'd lose more if your wires are too thin. Also,
          seriously consider a 24 or 48v system -- With a 10-foot 48v machine, you
          can run a couple hundred feet of wire from turbine to battery bank on
          #10 Romex. A trick we've used with 12v machines at long distances is
          slightly bigger magnets (wedges instead of rectangles) and a
          corresponding change in wire size and # of turns in the stator. With a
          short, thick wire run such a machine would stall badly. With the very
          spongy line of too-thin wire, it runs fine. Better to size the wire
          larger to begin with, but if that's cost prohibitive, that trick can
          work.
          >
          > Thanks to you if you have any answers to these newbie questions.
          > I will probably have lots more in the future.
          >
          >
          >

          Have fun!
          DANF
        • Vishwas Gokhale
          Hi! I am Vishwas Gokhale Pune India. While discussing axial flux generators ,you have been discussing all the time of coupling to a wind turbine. I am
          Message 4 of 5 , Sep 9, 2006
          View Source
          • 0 Attachment
            Hi!
            I am Vishwas Gokhale Pune India.
            While discussing  axial flux generators ,you have been discussing all the time of coupling to a wind turbine.  I am interested in biogas as an energy source. I am working on a concept of using old automobile engine complete  with its clutch and gearbox system. The old used ones are avaialable for as low price as 200 US$ . If this system is made to run on biogas and coupled to an axial flux generator complete with battery charging and battery bank mounted on the chasis, we have a comlete mobile power generation system which can be towed to the  biogas plant locations in indian villages.   In that case we  have a   decentralized power source at a place where it is needed most.  This is a requirement of power hungry people living in the backyard of human civilization.
             
            Can this group help me deviceing such a system?
            Dan Fink <danbob@...> wrote:
            Welcome to the group! I've interspersed some more info after Steve's
            comments. DAN F http://www.otherpow er.com/

            On Sat, 2006-09-09 at 07:58 +0000, axialflux@yahoogrou ps.com wrote:
            > I am interested in building a generator of my own, but I am new to
            > all this. I have read otherpower.com' s website, pretty much all of
            > it. But I still have a lot of questions, since I'm not an
            > electrician, but I have had some experience in some telephone
            > systems, (operating in a -48Volt DC environment) . Here are some
            > questions:
            >
            > 1. The more RPM's that the generator turns, produces more voltage/
            > or amps? What is the average voltage/ amps produced by a 3 phase
            > design spinning at a certain RPM? For example, if the generator is
            > turning at about 150 RPM, what output can I expect on average?
            >
            > You would have to test this with a calibrated rpm source.
            We use an optical tachometer to check each alternator after assembly. If
            you build a 10-footer with alternator similar to what we discuss here,
            you can expect cut-in at about 150 rpm (with a 12-volt
            turbine).... cut-in is when the turbine output voltage reaches the
            battery bank voltage and charging starts.
            >
            > 2. At high speeds, how bad is the HEAT produced by the generator?
            > Will this cause problems with the generator over time? and what can I
            > do to alleviate this problem?
            >
            > It's a very open design, so heat is not an issue. Air cooling works
            > great.

            Yep, not a problem -- *unless* something is preventing the turbine from
            furling or if you open up the airgap too much. As the output (and heat)
            in the stator increases, the wind speed is increasing too, for more
            cooling.
            >
            > 3. Would capacitors serve at all to STORE the energy? How well do
            > they work? Are they too expensive?
            >
            > Expensive, and not applicable to long term storage like batteries.
            > They are
            > for quick discharge applications. Batteries are so much cheaper. You
            > should
            > get 10+ years on a good deep cycle set if you treat them right.
            Yep!

            >
            > 4. If, by chance, the output of the generator is too MUCH for the
            > batteries, is there some type of shunt or device to help REGULATE
            > how much energy is placed in the batteries?
            >
            > The alternator is usually always too much for the batteries to allow
            > direct
            > connect. A charge controller is a must.
            And, the charge controller is different type than a standard solar panel
            controller. It has to divert power to a dump load (heating elements)
            when the batteries fill, because the wind turbine must *always* remain
            loaded. Some commercial controllers (Trace C-40 and C-60 for example)
            have a dump load setting and work out of the box for a wind turbine;
            just add water or air heating elements.
            >
            > 5. What size power cable would be best to deliver the energy from
            > the generator to the batteries? Say, a 50 Ft. distance? 1/0, 2/0,
            > 4/0? etc?
            >
            > There are calculators and tables that will determine wiring size for a
            > given
            > amperage/distance. Depends on the amps you are having to handle.

            You can go a little thinner than usual with a wind turbine, they don't
            mind a 'spongy' line...it does make them spin faster. Since most of your
            output is at low wind speeds and low power, there's little loss. At
            higher outputs, you'd lose more if your wires are too thin. Also,
            seriously consider a 24 or 48v system -- With a 10-foot 48v machine, you
            can run a couple hundred feet of wire from turbine to battery bank on
            #10 Romex. A trick we've used with 12v machines at long distances is
            slightly bigger magnets (wedges instead of rectangles) and a
            corresponding change in wire size and # of turns in the stator. With a
            short, thick wire run such a machine would stall badly. With the very
            spongy line of too-thin wire, it runs fine. Better to size the wire
            larger to begin with, but if that's cost prohibitive, that trick can
            work.
            >
            > Thanks to you if you have any answers to these newbie questions.
            > I will probably have lots more in the future.
            >
            >
            >

            Have fun!
            DANF




            Vishwas Gokhale
            Principal Consultant,
            GIT Associates,
            1034/2/B, 6, Annapurna Model colony,
            Pune 411016
            www.gitassociates.com


            Find out what India is talking about on - Yahoo! Answers India
            Send FREE SMS to your friend's mobile from Yahoo! Messenger Version 8. Get it NOW

          • Steve Spence
            Our goal with these units is to apply them to any type of motivator, whether wind, steam, human power, or engine. We can help you with this. Steve Spence
            Message 5 of 5 , Sep 11, 2006
            View Source
            • 0 Attachment

              Our goal with these units is to apply them to any type of motivator, whether wind, steam, human power, or engine. We can help you with this.

               

              Steve Spence

              Director, Green Trust

              http://www.green-trust.org


              From: axialflux@yahoogroups.com [mailto: axialflux@yahoogroups.com ] On Behalf Of Vishwas Gokhale
              Sent: Sunday, September 10, 2006 12:09 AM
              To: axialflux@yahoogroups.com
              Subject: Re: [axialflux] Newbie here to the group

               

              Hi!

              I am Vishwas Gokhale Pune India .

              While discussing  axial flux generators ,you have been discussing all the time of coupling to a wind turbine.  I am interested in biogas as an energy source. I am working on a concept of using old automobile engine complete  with its clutch and gearbox system. The old used ones are avaialable for as low price as 200 US$ . If this system is made to run on biogas and coupled to an axial flux generator complete with battery charging and battery bank mounted on the chasis, we have a comlete mobile power generation system which can be towed to the  biogas plant locations in indian villages.   In that case we  have a   decentralized power source at a place where it is needed most.  This is a requirement of power hungry people living in the backyard of human civilization.

               

              Can this group help me deviceing such a system?

            Your message has been successfully submitted and would be delivered to recipients shortly.