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Captain Beefheart rest in peace

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  • Cuneiform / Wayside
    It has been confirmed that Don van Vliet has died today of complications from MS, which he suffered from for many years. It was apparently a quite painful
    Message 1 of 4 , Dec 17, 2010
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      It has been confirmed that Don van Vliet has died today of
      complications from MS, which he suffered from for many years.

      It was apparently a quite painful birth - read John French's book
      Through the Eyes of Magic" - but no matter *how* it happened, he had
      a musical output that was significant and boundary breaking.

      He was very unwell for the last 25 years and had stopped making music
      nearly 30 years ago. But even so, he leaves behind a substantial and
      significant body of work. One that still continues to baffle many
      people while it entrances many others.

      45 years after his first recordings and NO ONE really ever sounded
      like him, did they?

      rest in peace, Don.


      Steve Feigenbaum
    • Gagliarchives Radio Philadelphia
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      Message 2 of 4 , Dec 17, 2010
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        --- On Fri, 12/17/10, Cuneiform / Wayside <CuneiWay@...> wrote:


        From: Cuneiform / Wayside <CuneiWay@...>
        Subject: [avant-progressive] Captain Beefheart rest in peace
        To: "Avant-Progressive" <avant-progressive@yahoogroups.com>
        Date: Friday, December 17, 2010, 5:09 PM


         



        It has been confirmed that Don van Vliet has died today of
        complications from MS, which he suffered from for many years.

        It was apparently a quite painful birth - read John French's book
        Through the Eyes of Magic" - but no matter *how* it happened, he had
        a musical output that was significant and boundary breaking.

        He was very unwell for the last 25 years and had stopped making music
        nearly 30 years ago. But even so, he leaves behind a substantial and
        significant body of work. One that still continues to baffle many
        people while it entrances many others.

        45 years after his first recordings and NO ONE really ever sounded
        like him, did they?

        rest in peace, Don.

        Steve Feigenbaum










        [Non-text portions of this message have been removed]
      • fastianed
        Hey all, That is sad news. He was definitely unique. Cruising youtube, I found several songs from a French TV performance in 1980. Very high quality shoot
        Message 3 of 4 , Dec 20, 2010
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          Hey all,
          That is sad news. He was definitely unique. Cruising youtube, I found several songs from a French TV performance in 1980. Very high quality shoot and of course great songs mostly from Doc. Also a BBC documentary narrated by John Peel from the late 90's is very good. Lots of clips and interviews with John French, Frank Zappa, Jimmy Carl Black,Ry Cooder, and others.

          John T

          --- In avant-progressive@yahoogroups.com, Cuneiform / Wayside <CuneiWay@...> wrote:
          >
          > It has been confirmed that Don van Vliet has died today of
          > complications from MS, which he suffered from for many years.
          >
          > It was apparently a quite painful birth - read John French's book
          > Through the Eyes of Magic" - but no matter *how* it happened, he had
          > a musical output that was significant and boundary breaking.
          >
          > He was very unwell for the last 25 years and had stopped making music
          > nearly 30 years ago. But even so, he leaves behind a substantial and
          > significant body of work. One that still continues to baffle many
          > people while it entrances many others.
          >
          > 45 years after his first recordings and NO ONE really ever sounded
          > like him, did they?
          >
          > rest in peace, Don.
          >
          >
          > Steve Feigenbaum
          >
        • ghodges223
          I was in an all-vinyl LP store in Berkeley several weeks ago and since the owner wasn t playing any music on his turntable, and I was the only customer in the
          Message 4 of 4 , Feb 5, 2011
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            I was in an all-vinyl LP store in Berkeley several weeks ago and since the owner wasn't playing any music on his turntable, and I was the only customer in the store, I requested that he put on his copy of "Trout Mask Replica" he had for sale, which he was glad to do. I had never listened to this album all the way thru, so I was educated- At the end of the first side of the first album, the owner commented, "Very abstract!",  and I agreed. Very intriguing listening- at one point it seemed that the owner was talking to other employees in a disguised room near the counter that perhaps I had failed to notice, but then I realized that there WERE no people (nor other room), and that the random voices I was hearing were actually in the music itself- It was difficult to follow the meaning of the words, perhaps logic was not the tool to use when listening.  Very artistic approach- barrier breaking to be sure.  The guitar breaks (I'm not familiar with the guitarists)  reminded me a lot of  some of French, Frith, Kaiser, Thompson's music- Henry Kaiser's guitar playing has a lot of Captain Beefheart in it, and Fred Frith I'm sure appreciates this music (actually, I'm sure he loves this music).  The owner of the store, months earlier, had a copy of the album Captain Beefheart did with Frank Zappa,  they did as a duo (1970-1971?)- but it was sold (I had wanted to buy it, but passed it up in November).  I asked how he liked that album and he said it was great...(I think he mentioned "Muffin Man") and said he would look for another copy, which I will buy if he finds.

            Anyway, there is a Captain Beefheart Tribute concert at the Independent (Grove and Divisidero in SF) on Friday 2/11/2011, for those of you in the SF Bay Area, where they will be showing films, original artwork (Don van Vliet's paintings!), and remembrances (who is Gary
            Lucas?,  he organized the event) for $20/ticket- I plan to be there- save me a ticket...

            There is, and never will be another artist like him.  Fascinating music if you open your ears...
            Sad to lose uncompromising people who think like this, and REFUSE to tailor their art to try and conform to a market,...They're called pioneers.
            R.I.P.

            Gary H.

            On Dec 20, 2010, at 6:35:19 PM, fastian@... wrote:

            From: fastianed <fastian@...>
            Subject: [avant-progressive] Re: Captain Beefheart rest in peace
            Date: December 20, 2010 6:33:30 PM PST
            To: avant-progressive@yahoogroups.com
            Hey all,
            That is sad news. He was definitely unique. Cruising youtube, I found several songs from a French TV performance in 1980. Very high quality shoot and of course great songs mostly from Doc. Also a BBC documentary narrated by John Peel from the late 90's is very good. Lots of clips and interviews with John French, Frank Zappa, Jimmy Carl Black,Ry Cooder, and others.

            John T

            --- In avant-progressive@yahoogroups.com, Cuneiform / Wayside <CuneiWay@...> wrote:
            >
            > It has been confirmed that Don van Vliet has died today of 
            > complications from MS, which he suffered from for many years.

            > It was apparently a quite painful birth - read John French's book 
            > Through the Eyes of Magic" - but no matter *how* it happened, he had 
            > a musical output that was significant and boundary breaking.

            > He was very unwell for the last 25 years and had stopped making music 
            > nearly 30 years ago. But even so, he leaves behind a substantial and 
            > significant body of work. One that still continues to baffle many 
            > people while it entrances many others.

            > 45 years after his first recordings and NO ONE really ever sounded 
            > like him, did they?

            > rest in peace, Don.


            > Steve Feigenbaum
            >



            [Non-text portions of this message have been removed]
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