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Re: [avant-progressive] Re: Luciano Pavarotti: RIP !. -

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  • Michael Feathers
    ... That sums it up for me. I love Magma but I never could stand real operatic singing.
    Message 1 of 10 , Sep 7, 2007
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      Gerald Van Waes wrote:

      >When Pavarotti just came up, a guy who was very much into classical music
      >said to me Pavarotti had just not enough talent to make it in the opera
      >world to the real professionals, but then when he tried the popular way,
      >suddenly everybody was saying he was the greatest voice that ever lived.
      >With his voice I personally always was reminded at frogs, at the stage when
      >you fry then, and they sing before they explode.
      >
      That sums it up for me. I love Magma but I never could stand real
      operatic singing.
    • Gerald Van Waes
      Michael Feathers ro : That sums it up for me. I love Magma but I never could stand real operatic singing. Well, there still exist certain different styles in
      Message 2 of 10 , Sep 7, 2007
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        Michael Feathers ro : That sums it up for me. I love Magma but I never could
        stand real
        operatic singing.



        Well, there still exist certain different styles in operatic singing. One of
        the styles is to sound like Pavarotti, blown up with push. Of course you
        have to have volume if you want to reach a whole cinema of an audience. But
        just go to all voices ever recorded….from 1920’s until now.. you can hear
        many other surprises and approaches. Some “Italian schools” make singers
        sound like dying in a Passolini movie. It is so decadent and unreal. But
        just hear Marian Anderson in the ‘40s for instance : she learned gospel
        first. A very natural voice. New voices like the Belgian Van Seele or
        Spanish new voices I cannot recall right now, one realises there are more
        natural ways of singing with real personalities. Why uplift Pavarotti like
        the Madonna star in opera ? It is also good to realize the fake part of it
        too. If you take the real greats, you immediately hear the difference.
        Altough Italian opera can use Passolini kind of exaggerations well. One of
        my favourite voices ever is Alfred Deller. Very subtle. His voice was
        perfect for Purcell. A completely different technique he had, autodidactic
        as he was he formed a new school.



        PS. The voices used for Magma sounds natural to me. Like the female singer
        from Amon Düül II. Wasn’t she a guest once ?



        Gerald



        [Non-text portions of this message have been removed]
      • Michael Feathers
        ... You ve got a point. I shouldn t write off the whole genre. The thing I don t like to hear is severe strain in a voice. It just bothers me. The one operatic
        Message 3 of 10 , Sep 7, 2007
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          Gerald Van Waes wrote:

          >Michael Feathers ro : That sums it up for me. I love Magma but I never could
          >stand real
          >operatic singing.
          >
          >
          >
          >Well, there still exist certain different styles in operatic singing. One of
          >the styles is to sound like Pavarotti, blown up with push. Of course you
          >have to have volume if you want to reach a whole cinema of an audience. But
          >just go to all voices ever recorded….from 1920’s until now.. you can hear
          >many other surprises and approaches. Some “Italian schools” make singers
          >sound like dying in a Passolini movie. It is so decadent and unreal. But
          >just hear Marian Anderson in the ‘40s for instance : she learned gospel
          >first. A very natural voice. New voices like the Belgian Van Seele or
          >Spanish new voices I cannot recall right now, one realises there are more
          >natural ways of singing with real personalities. Why uplift Pavarotti like
          >the Madonna star in opera ? It is also good to realize the fake part of it
          >too. If you take the real greats, you immediately hear the difference.
          >Altough Italian opera can use Passolini kind of exaggerations well. One of
          >my favourite voices ever is Alfred Deller. Very subtle. His voice was
          >perfect for Purcell. A completely different technique he had, autodidactic
          >as he was he formed a new school.
          >
          >
          >
          >PS. The voices used for Magma sounds natural to me. Like the female singer
          >from Amon Düül II. Wasn’t she a guest once ?
          >
          You've got a point. I shouldn't write off the whole genre. The thing I
          don't like to hear is severe strain in a voice. It just bothers me. The
          one operatic singer I do like is a guy named Ivan Rebroff(sp?). He could
          sing in an insanely low register.
        • Joe Barnekow
          ... German singer ( I.R. not his real name) who became famous with his pseudo-russian repertoire. Had even some hits in the German charts some 30 years ago.
          Message 4 of 10 , Sep 7, 2007
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            Michael Feathers schrieb:
            > The
            > one operatic singer I do like is a guy named Ivan Rebroff(sp?). He could
            > sing in an insanely low register.
            >
            >
            German singer ( I.R. not his real name) who became famous with his
            pseudo-russian repertoire. Had even some hits in the German charts some
            30 years ago.
            Maybe the voice is bearable but the the songs are total kitsch! If you
            want to know more, look here:

            http://www.ivan-rebroff.de/ir.htm

            Joe
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