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Re: Ahleuchatistas

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  • Michael Anton Parker
    Here s something I forgot to send along with my long post about Ahleuchatistas. It s a short, wonderfully written essay by the guitarist explaining the
    Message 1 of 10 , Dec 1, 2004
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      Here's something I forgot to send along with my long post about
      Ahleuchatistas. It's a short, wonderfully written essay by the
      guitarist explaining the band's name, and I think it not only gives
      some insight to their music, but gives a sense of the human dimension
      and intellect of this fine band.

      It's from their website:
      http://ahleuchatistas.com/go.php

      Mike Parker
      SE Pennsylvania

      np: Supuration "The Cube" (hey, I think I heard a Voivod cover on this
      album! very good album!)

      The best way to predict the future is to invent it. --Alan Kay

      -----------------------------------------------

      Mon Apr 19th 2004
      Ahleuchatistas: What's in a Name?
      By Shane Perlowin

      Consider the music of Charlie Parker and its origins. The oppressive
      conditions of the black ghetto in pre-Civil Rights Movement usa gave
      birth to one of the most revolutionary advances in music. the effects
      of which will be felt in music for the duration of human civilization.
      all serious "jazz" players after Bird followed suit or at least
      attempted to. His ideas inspire innumerable genres, often unbeknownst
      to the musicians executing them. His compositions continue to excite
      and challenge. A song called "Ah-Leu-Cha" is a particularly unique and
      thrilling piece, especially the version performed on the album Miles
      and Coltrane, by (no kidding!) Miles Davis and John Coltrane. This
      version is on fire!!! The melody is a barrage of electricity and
      sweat, the solos are relentless. Bebop posed a serious challenge to
      radio music and the dominant methods of administering culture. Its
      agitated and angular sound, syncopated rhythms, and blistering tempos
      planted its roots firmly out on the margins of US culture. Its
      emphasis on fresh improvisations that completely departed from a tunes
      main melody and instead relied on creative cunning in the heat of the
      moment in the context of rapidly shifting harmonies made
      compartmentalization and reproduction difficult for the record
      industry and the public relations industry; they could not easily
      subdue (pacify, colonize) it and sell it to a "mainstream" audience.
      This was no accident. This music was and is intellectually
      challenging, emotionally agitating (exciting!), self rewarding for the
      musicians performing it, cathartic. It is a far cry from the
      "affirmative" music you hear on jazz radio stations today owned by The
      Clear Channel Corporation. "Cool Jazz", "Breezy", "Light 101.5 FM".
      this garbage affirms the here and now, champions present conditions,
      delights in bland homogeneity. And that is its purpose, to relax you
      at the office, to stroke you after your long day of sitting in the
      cubicle in front of the computer screen, you drift away on the Bose
      wave-speaker seas of bright synthesizer major scale motifs and Kenny
      Gs aural Zoloft for the soul makes you boring, complacent, obedient,
      and psychologically prepared to take shit from your miserable boss
      while licking little red, white and blue postage stamps and reloading
      the stapler. Whereas bop will not let you settle. Dr. Martin Luther
      King Jr. quoted Socrates in his "Letter from Birmingham Jail" to point
      out that the mind must experience agitation in order to be shaken
      enough to necessarily question the present conditions of its
      existence. He was defending militant direct action as a tactic for
      bringing about justice within a society that was entrenched in smug
      bigotry and dismissive ambiguity. Bop and subsequent forms that have
      stayed true to the calling maintain the necessary agitation to inspire
      radical change in culture and politics, stoking the much needed
      variety and spontaneity in what can otherwise be a pretty grim and
      apathy-inspiring scene.

      Now fast forward to 1994 to the Present day. The Zapatista struggle in
      Chiapas, Mexico continues. Hijacking the culture industry through
      tech savvy and compelling ideological communiques, declaring autonomy
      through armed struggle and self-valorization in resistance to
      concentrated powers attempts to ghettoize and homogenize, to co-opt
      and steamroll through exclusionary trade agreements, the Zapatistas
      similarly embody and inspire principles of radical subjectivity, a
      reveling in marginalization from the banality of the imperial culture
      industrys malaise. Dubious attempts to coerce indigenous peoples into
      the same ghetto scene that birthed bebop have been nipped in the bud.
      at least temporarily. Their break from the norm of subservience and
      pliability too has had its effects on aesthetic culture beyond its
      locus. The Zapatistas have become the subject matter of popular music
      and art, punk culture and hip-hop have both benefited from the
      inspired resistance and bravery of an underdogs attempts at willful
      marginal autonomy.

      Are these sentiments in our music? They are. Not explicitly and
      rationally, but implicitly and viscerally. The same instinctual
      rebellion to questionable external conditions is a source for our
      creative energy. Whether or not such notions are conveyed completely
      is improbable. Is it a labor of love and necessity committed within
      the belly of the beast? Absolutely. I am in no way suggesting that
      we, the musicians, suffer a degree of oppression that is in any way
      comparable to that suffered by the indigenous peoples of Latin America
      or poor people of color in the united states. We are interrelated and
      interdependent. materially, economically, and culturally. We simply
      hope to make a positive cultural contribution to this dialogue that
      will transcend the parameters of administered culture and fire salvos
      from below the radar and create something positive in the world that
      will lend to the furtherance of people resisting prescribed culture
      that is administered from above.

      ---------------------------------------
    • StoOdin101@aol.com
      In a message dated 12/1/2004 5:20:26 PM Eastern Standard Time, michaelantonparker@gmail.com writes: np: Supuration The Cube (hey, I think I heard a Voivod
      Message 2 of 10 , Dec 1, 2004
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        In a message dated 12/1/2004 5:20:26 PM Eastern Standard Time,
        michaelantonparker@... writes:
        np: Supuration "The Cube" (hey, I think I heard a Voivod cover on this
        album! very good album!)
        .
        .
        Can't go wrong with VOIVOD. Except that, well, you _can._ But when they were
        good, they were supernally good. Dimension Hatross...Nothingface...Angel
        Rat...Outer Limits...essential discs.





        ø¤º°`°º¤ø,,,,ø¤º°`°º¤ø,,,,ø¤º°`°º¤ø,,,,ø¤º°`°º¤ø¤º°`°º¤ø,,,,ø¤ºø¤º°`°º¤ø,,,,ø¤
        º°`°º¤ø,,,,ø¤º°`°º¤

        Classical Music: a complex organisation of sound, set down by the composer,
        ill-served by the conductor, mangled by the musicians and ignored by the
        audience.


        [Non-text portions of this message have been removed]
      • Michael Anton Parker
        ... @@@@ Hmm, I d definitely add Killing Technology to a list of great, classic Voivod albums, even if the avant-gardism was less pronounced in that period,
        Message 3 of 10 , Dec 1, 2004
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          @@@ Stoodin:
          > Can't go wrong with VOIVOD. Except that, well, you _can._ But when they were
          > good, they were supernally good. Dimension Hatross...Nothingface...Angel
          > Rat...Outer Limits...essential discs.
          @@@@

          Hmm, I'd definitely add Killing Technology to a list of great, classic
          Voivod albums, even if the avant-gardism was less pronounced in that
          period, but I've never heard anything earlier than that one, or more
          recent than Angel Rat, so I've happily never heard anything less than
          great by them! I trust the opinions of those who say there have been
          stinkers in the past ten years.... The only Voivod I'd personally
          call "essential" would be Nothingface and maybe Dimension, but Angel
          Rat is pretty damn great too, kind of a "pop" album! I'll make a
          point of hearing Outer Limits sometime based on your recommendation...

          Mike Parker
          SE Pennsylvania

          np: Forever Einstein "One Thing After Another" [those bass harmonics are SICK!]

          The best way to predict the future is to invent it. --Alan Kay
        • StoOdin101@aol.com
          In a message dated 12/1/2004 9:30:02 PM Eastern Standard Time, michaelantonparker@gmail.com writes: I ll make a point of hearing Outer Limits sometime based on
          Message 4 of 10 , Dec 1, 2004
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            In a message dated 12/1/2004 9:30:02 PM Eastern Standard Time,
            michaelantonparker@... writes:
            I'll make a
            point of hearing Outer Limits sometime based on your recommendation
            .
            .
            .
            Outer Limits is a schizoid disc; some of it is could have come from Angel
            Rat, some of it from Nothingface. For my money, though, that disc is a must-own
            because of the tracks THE LOST MACHINE, WE ARE NOT ALONE, and most importantly,
            the 17-minute magnum opus JACK LUMINOUS, a mini-rock-opera about alien
            invasion that incorporates themes from the original Outer Limits TV series in its
            composition. It should be as well-known among proggers as SUPPERS READY or
            PLAGUE OF LIGHTHOUSE KEEPERS. Really good stuff.
            I'll go along with adding Killing Technology to the list, because it's the
            first one where the signs of brilliance emerge (THIS IS NOT AN EXERCISE,
            anyone?). But when Snake left the band and they replaced him with ... gz, I don't
            remember the guy's name, some growler ... the musical content returned to War
            and Pain/Rrroooaaarrr thrash. Can't recommend any of those discs (Negatron,
            Phobos, Voivod Lives). The recent return of Snake to the fold on the latest album,
            Voivod, resulted in a disc about as good as Killing Technology. It's
            listenable, but it's sure not where they once were. (It does have a set of lyrics that
            go down in the Idiotic Annals of History: "What is it?/Looks like an
            invisible planet!" I see things that look like invisible planets all the time, sheesh!
            ) Still, maybe there's hope...





            ø¤º°`°º¤ø,,,,ø¤º°`°º¤ø,,,,ø¤º°`°º¤ø,,,,ø¤º°`°º¤ø¤º°`°º¤ø,,,,ø¤ºø¤º°`°º¤ø,,,,ø¤
            º°`°º¤ø,,,,ø¤º°`°º¤

            Classical Music: a complex organisation of sound, set down by the composer,
            ill-served by the conductor, mangled by the musicians and ignored by the
            audience.


            [Non-text portions of this message have been removed]
          • Bart
            Hi StoOdin, I like the old VoiVod too. I agree with your recommendations. But I don t have Outer Limits nor ever heard it what makes me sometimes sad. But was
            Message 5 of 10 , Dec 1, 2004
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              Hi StoOdin,
              I like the old VoiVod too. I agree with your recommendations.
              But I don't have Outer Limits nor ever heard it what makes me sometimes sad. But was always living in feel that it's great album.
              And have Angel Rat only on old old tape, tho still in reach on the rack.
              Cheers
              Bart



              StoOdin101@... napisał:
              >In a message dated 12/1/2004 9:30:02 PM Eastern Standard Time,
              >michaelantonparker@... writes:
              >I\'ll make a
              >point of hearing Outer Limits sometime based on your recommendation
              >.
              >.
              >.
              >Outer Limits is a schizoid disc; some of it is could have come from Angel
              >Rat, some of it from Nothingface. For my money, though, that disc is a must-own
              >because of the tracks THE LOST MACHINE, WE ARE NOT ALONE, and most importantly,
              >the 17-minute magnum opus JACK LUMINOUS, a mini-rock-opera about alien
              >invasion that incorporates themes from the original Outer Limits TV series in its
              >composition. It should be as well-known among proggers as SUPPERS READY or
              >PLAGUE OF LIGHTHOUSE KEEPERS. Really good stuff.
              >I\'ll go along with adding Killing Technology to the list, because it\'s the
              >first one where the signs of brilliance emerge (THIS IS NOT AN EXERCISE,
              >anyone?). But when Snake left the band and they replaced him with ... gz, I don\'t
              >remember the guy\'s name, some growler ... the musical content returned to War
              >and Pain/Rrroooaaarrr thrash. Can\'t recommend any of those discs (Negatron,
              >Phobos, Voivod Lives). The recent return of Snake to the fold on the latest album,
              >Voivod, resulted in a disc about as good as Killing Technology. It\'s
              >listenable, but it\'s sure not where they once were. (It does have a set of lyrics that
              >go down in the Idiotic Annals of History: "What is it?/Looks like an
              >invisible planet!" I see things that look like invisible planets all the time, sheesh!
              > ) Still, maybe there\'s hope...
            • Bart
              Mike s Borella comments about his recent listening to latest Magma three times in row of this album, caused meself to listen to it constantly last night also
              Message 6 of 10 , Dec 1, 2004
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                Mike's Borella comments about his recent listening to latest Magma three times in row of this album, caused meself to listen to it constantly last night also three times in a repeat mode. What a great frenzy (in positive meaning) time I had with it!. Superb stuv.
                Cheers
                Bart
              • Michael Feathers
                ... So, I see my Wayside order was shipped. That means it may be home when I get home back from a trip Friday night... a couple of questions: Is the
                Message 7 of 10 , Dec 2, 2004
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                  Bart wrote:

                  > Mike's Borella comments about his recent listening to latest Magma
                  > three times in row of this album, caused meself to listen to it
                  > constantly last night also three times in a repeat mode. What a great
                  > frenzy (in positive meaning) time I had with it!. Superb stuv.
                  > Cheers
                  > Bart


                  So, I see my Wayside order was shipped. That means it may be home when
                  I get home back from a trip Friday night... a couple of questions: Is
                  the composition and "builder upper" like Kohntarkosz with a big climax?
                  Does it peter off into a long jam like MDK? What's its shape?
                • Mike Borella
                  ... Its more of an up and down, tension-and-release sort of thing. KA II, the second track is particularly intesne at parts. Mike -- Mike Borella mike at
                  Message 8 of 10 , Dec 2, 2004
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                    Michael Feathers wrote:

                    >
                    > So, I see my Wayside order was shipped. That means it may be home when
                    > I get home back from a trip Friday night... a couple of questions: Is
                    > the composition and "builder upper" like Kohntarkosz with a big climax?
                    > Does it peter off into a long jam like MDK? What's its shape?
                    >

                    Its more of an up and down, tension-and-release sort of thing. KA II,
                    the second track is particularly intesne at parts.

                    Mike

                    --
                    Mike Borella
                    mike at borella dot net
                    http://www.borella.net

                    Avant Music News
                    http://www.somnius.com/amn
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