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21638Re: Is it okay to not care for/understand some music?/Lol on Ogun

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  • Brian K
    Nov 1, 2006
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      >Personally, I find even his freest stuff quite lyrical and tuneful,
      >but Coxhill has a very varied catalog. What you have is basically The
      >Joy of Paranoia I think.

      Hi Lenny,

      Thanks for the reply on this. Recommendations do sound like they'd be
      pretty good. Lol must be the musician who actually must have played
      in every context. "Coxhill On Ogun" as Lol mentions in the notes,
      starts with "The Joy of Paranoia" (from '77)and then the '76
      album "Diverse", where he is totally solo on two long tunes: "Diver"
      and "Divers". They actually do seem to be very lyrical and tuneful at
      times themselves, sounding like some great bebop wanting too break
      out of his weaving-like playing, but then falls apart again and I
      admit I've gotten a chuckles out of it.

      The first tune "Diver" begins with some funny
      shreiking/grating/skronking noises that one can't help but get a
      laugh out of it (I mean this in a good way!). I take it as his sense
      of humor at work though.

      There are some good points to it I have to admit, but I also must
      admit I feel maybe that my mind just can't make sense out of it with
      all the randomness. I would consider my attention span at least
      better than average as I've listened to some pretty complex music
      already (not bragging believe me), but this music seems to way over
      my head-very clinical mostly to me. Another thing that doesn't help
      is that this Ogun CD sounds like it may have been recorded almost
      directly from somewhat good, yet a bit scratchy here-and-there vinyl
      copies of the two albums. I'd like too look into his other work that
      you've mentioned, but I personally and honestly just can't recommend
      Lol's Ogun work here as a place too start for others like me just now
      and in the future seeking out his work.

      Sorry for all this length,
      Take Care,
      Brian




      --- In avant-progressive@yahoogroups.com, "palcontented1"
      <palcontented1@...> wrote:
      >
      > --- In avant-progressive@yahoogroups.com, "Brian K" <brian011879@>
      > wrote:
      >
      > Personally, I find even his freest stuff quite lyrical and tuneful,
      > but Coxhill has a very varied catalog. What you have is basically
      The
      > Joy of Paranoia I think. You may prefer the one that was originally
      on
      > Random Radar, Digswell Duets, half of which is with pianist Veryan
      > Weston and the other with Simon Emerson's electronics. I really like
      > Lol's work on Max Nagl's album of Edward Gorey settings, The Evil
      > Garden (also with Julie Tippetts). Unfortunately much of the
      eccentric
      > stuff that shows his self deprecating wit and variety to best effect
      > is either o/p or has never been reissued. Hardly any of the Nato or
      > Chabada recordings ever made it to cd, and there is some great
      > unlikely material out there. The Melody Four recordings for instance
      > with Beresford and Coe, or The Recedents with Mike Cooper and Roger
      > Turner, present quite a contrast. His early solo Fleas in Custard,
      and
      > the Welfare State lp for which he served as musical director also
      > embody this ease with contrasting material. I have the first of the
      > two Miller/Coxhill's and it's quite pleasant. You should maybe start
      > with Ear of the Beholder which can still be found, I think, is quite
      > varied and gives a good idea of his spirit.
      >
      > I will always remember with fondness his performance with The
      > Recedents in 1990. I don't think he was even planning to play his
      sax.
      > He had this small assembly of cheap electronic circuitry, and it
      > malfunctioned. Turner and Cooper just kept playing as Lol kvetched
      to
      > them about his gear, got out a suitcase and laboriously packed it
      all
      > away, muttering to himself the entire time. Then he pulled a curved
      > soprano out of its case and played some of the most beautiful
      > expressive lines to be heard this side of Steve Lacy. To this day I
      > don't know whether he was really pissed off, or if it was a kind of
      > low rent performance art, but their set was wonderful.
      > >
      > > I have "Coxhill on Ogun", and I've given this many, many spins on
      my
      > > walkman, with uninterrupted listening. There's some good parts,
      > > like "The Wakefield Capers". For the life of me, I can't get
      myself
      > > into most of the rest of the album (mostly solo).
      > >
      > > I'm guessing his work with others like the Miller Bros., BofB,
      and
      > > The Whole World are quite good though.
      > >
      > > I really want too get into enjoying British and European free-
      > > improvisation music, but all the samples on Allmusic.com, like
      with
      > > my Coxhill album, it just won't register into my head or
      something. I
      > > really like Martin Davidson's website for Emanem, and the
      selections
      > > look they'd be very interesting, but I'm scared I may buy
      something I
      > > might not care for. I really miss the rules of structure with
      free-
      > > improvisation so far. It's just not like free-jazz to me.
      > >
      > > Any good starting points for free-improvistion stuff? You can e-
      mail
      > > me offline on that if you feel more comfortable.
      > >
      > > By the way, I am loving and enjoying a few great albums right
      now:
      > > Missus Beastly (with gorilla cover, 1974, really great btw!) Cos-
      > > "Post-Aeolian Train Robbery", Companyia Electrica
      > > Dharma "L'oucomballa" and Edition Speciale "Aliquante"--all of
      which
      > > are Superb music! Ann Ballester really smokes on the ARP! Also,
      Harry
      > > Miller's "Which Way Now"(Awesome, and packs quite a punch I might
      > > add!) and SM's "Middle Earth Masters". I also like SML's 'new'
      studio
      > > album, but am saddened knowing this was the last recording with
      Elton
      > > (the album is dedicated to him). Patrizio Fariseeli's piano
      > > renditions of Area material is great, but I better buy a PAL DVD
      > > player off ebay if I want to watch it someday, lol! Finally, I
      have
      > > Nigel Morris' "Soundscapes and Conversations", which is a very
      nice
      > > comeback for him.
      > >
      > > Sorry for the length,
      > > Take Care,
      > > Brian
      > >
      >
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