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Re: [australianherps] One more reason against exotics?

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  • Anne Thomas
    Yey I agree my husband and I have many snakes and all of them are in locked cabinets. We would not keep snakes unless they are locked away. The people who
    Message 1 of 13 , Jul 4, 2009
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      Yey I agree my husband and I have many snakes and all of them are in locked cabinets. We would not keep snakes unless they are locked away. The people who kept this snake it not do their homework on how to keep and how to house. If they did then may be this accident would not have happened.
      Anne




      ________________________________
      From: John Fowler <rajohn1@...>
      To: australianherps@yahoogroups.com
      Sent: Friday, 3 July, 2009 8:05:17 PM
      Subject: RE: [australianherps] One more reason against exotics?





      I'm not sure if this could be used as an argument against keeping exotics,
      rather than keeping large pythons, or other "dangerous" reptiles.

      A corn snake or red eared terrapin is exotic and is unlikely to be able to
      kill a child, although I suppose a young child might try and eat a terrapin
      and choke to death on it.

      Also, there are many animals kept in Australia that are probably more
      dangerous than that particular python.

      Horses, can kill and injure adults, Dogs can also be very dangerous, and
      animals straying onto roads, (native and stock) can cause fatal accidents.

      There are plenty of dangerous Australian venomous snakes that would be more
      of a concern than a largish python.

      I think part of the problem is that the Burmese python, was possibly not
      considered to be dangerous at all by its owner, as it wasn't a gigantic
      snake, it also might have been quite docile.

      It is unfortunate that accidents happen, no matter how many laws are in
      place, and we need to be aware of the dangers. Personally I would be against
      any laws that banned keeping pythons. We already have too much regulation.

      We already have laws that prohibit exotics, - Are those laws likely to be
      loosened in the future?

      John

      -----Original Message-----
      From: australianherps@ yahoogroups. com
      [mailto:australianherps@ yahoogroups. com] On Behalf Of Jean DAndrea
      Sent: Friday, 3 July 2009 12:45 PM
      To: australianherps@ yahoogroups. com
      Subject: Re: [australianherps] One more reason against exotics?

      --- On Thu, 2/7/09, stephen.weir@ csiro.au <stephen.weir@ csiro.au> wrote:

      Hi Steve,

      Agree it's another argument against exotics.  
      I blame the parents for the snake's escape - they should have made
      sure it was secure in it's cage, and that if it did get out, it couldn't
      get into the child's room

      Now the snake, and the parents, are suffering, all from a preventable
      incident.  

      I hope the snake survives.

      Jean











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    • Anne Thomas
      So do I. It was nt the snakes fault the owners must have not done their homework. Anne ________________________________ From: Jean DAndrea
      Message 2 of 13 , Jul 4, 2009
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        So do I. It was'nt the snakes fault the owners must have not done their homework.
        Anne




        ________________________________
        From: Jean DAndrea <snakesmum@...>
        To: australianherps@yahoogroups.com
        Sent: Friday, 3 July, 2009 12:44:47 PM
        Subject: Re: [australianherps] One more reason against exotics?






        --- On Thu, 2/7/09, stephen.weir@ csiro.au <stephen.weir@ csiro.au> wrote:

        Hi Steve,

        Agree it's another argument against exotics.  
        I blame the parents for the snake's escape - they should have made
        sure it was secure in it's cage, and that if it did get out, it couldn't
        get into the child's room

        Now the snake, and the parents, are suffering, all from a preventable
        incident.  

        I hope the snake survives.

        Jean











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      • tye purnell
        It is always going to be dangerous to keep large pythons, our olive pythons for example are capable of growing larger than 2.5 meters and could easily kill an
        Message 3 of 13 , Jul 9, 2009
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          It is always going to be dangerous to keep large pythons, our olive pythons for example
          are capable of growing larger than 2.5 meters and could easily kill an infant. it was only a few years ago that and Australian man was killed by his scrub python. this side of the story is a real reality check for keepers.
           
           The big issue with exotics is given the optunity to be free in our australian environment, some species can be devestating to our native wildlife, corn snakes might sound safe enough but when they become a competitor in the wild with our Broad headed snakes for example, you can be sure that the native species which is very slow to reproduce and is aleady a species with a small population is going to be pushed out.
           
            I hope that we keep our laws against exotics for the protection of our own species, it would also be great if NPWS were more on the ball with this subject, I am not sure who is responsible for tracking exotic breeders down but there are plenty out there. I work in a petstore, in the last week alone i have had people buying heat lights to incubate chemeleon eggs, mice for corn snakes and also the cheapest and most inappropriate housing for corn snakes. that is just this past week and there are plenty more stories to tell from the past 2 and a half years.
           
          Tye
           
           
           
          --- On Fri, 3/7/09, John Fowler <rajohn1@...> wrote:


          From: John Fowler <rajohn1@...>
          Subject: RE: [australianherps] One more reason against exotics?
          To: australianherps@yahoogroups.com
          Received: Friday, 3 July, 2009, 8:35 PM








          I'm not sure if this could be used as an argument against keeping exotics,
          rather than keeping large pythons, or other "dangerous" reptiles.

          A corn snake or red eared terrapin is exotic and is unlikely to be able to
          kill a child, although I suppose a young child might try and eat a terrapin
          and choke to death on it.

          Also, there are many animals kept in Australia that are probably more
          dangerous than that particular python.

          Horses, can kill and injure adults, Dogs can also be very dangerous, and
          animals straying onto roads, (native and stock) can cause fatal accidents.

          There are plenty of dangerous Australian venomous snakes that would be more
          of a concern than a largish python.

          I think part of the problem is that the Burmese python, was possibly not
          considered to be dangerous at all by its owner, as it wasn't a gigantic
          snake, it also might have been quite docile.

          It is unfortunate that accidents happen, no matter how many laws are in
          place, and we need to be aware of the dangers. Personally I would be against
          any laws that banned keeping pythons. We already have too much regulation.

          We already have laws that prohibit exotics, - Are those laws likely to be
          loosened in the future?

          John

          -----Original Message-----
          From: australianherps@ yahoogroups. com
          [mailto:australianherps@ yahoogroups. com] On Behalf Of Jean DAndrea
          Sent: Friday, 3 July 2009 12:45 PM
          To: australianherps@ yahoogroups. com
          Subject: Re: [australianherps] One more reason against exotics?

          --- On Thu, 2/7/09, stephen.weir@ csiro.au <stephen.weir@ csiro.au> wrote:

          Hi Steve,

          Agree it's another argument against exotics.  
          I blame the parents for the snake's escape - they should have made
          sure it was secure in it's cage, and that if it did get out, it couldn't
          get into the child's room

          Now the snake, and the parents, are suffering, all from a preventable
          incident.  

          I hope the snake survives.

          Jean











          ____________ _________ _________ _________ _________ _________ _
          ________
          Access Yahoo!7 Mail on your mobile. Anytime. Anywhere.
          Show me how: http://au.mobile yahoo.com/ mail

          [Non-text portions of this message have been removed]

          ------------ --------- --------- ------

          Yahoo! Groups Links

          Checked by AVG - www.avg.com
          Version: 8.5.375 / Virus Database: 270.13.2/2215 - Release Date: 07/02/09
          18:06:00

















          ____________________________________________________________________________________
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