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RE: [australianherps] Cane Toad Research

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  • Stu
    Seems to me, it might be too little too late. Why wasn t this done ten years ago. Stu ... From: stephen.weir@csiro.au [mailto:stephen.weir@csiro.au] Sent:
    Message 1 of 4 , Aug 31, 2004
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      Seems to me, it might be too little too late.

      Why wasn't this done ten years ago.

      Stu

      -----Original Message-----
      From: stephen.weir@... [mailto:stephen.weir@...]
      Sent: Wednesday, 1 September 2004 1:30 PM
      To: australianfrogs@yahoogroups.com; australianherps@yahoogroups.com
      Subject: [australianherps] Cane Toad Research

      From http://www.abc.net.au/news/newsitems/200408/s1188794.htm

      Last Update: Tuesday, August 31, 2004. 12:19pm (AEST)

      The CSIRO is working on a genetic virus that will kill cane toads.
      (Reuters)

      Virus aims to stop cane toad march
      The CSIRO says it is developing a genetic virus that will kill cane
      toads as they develop from tadpoles.

      Earlier this week, the Federal Government warned that Western Australia
      is facing an invasion by cane toads migrating from South Australia and
      the Northern Territory.

      The national science body says the virus will act as a vehicle for a
      genetic trigger that causes the cane toads to stop developing and die
      when they are in their tadpole phase.

      CSIRO research scientist Tony Robinson says the development of the virus
      will take at least 10 years, but once introduced it will cut their
      numbers effectively.

      Mr Robinson says the CSIRO is developing long-term solutions that will
      tie in with current efforts by other agencies to reduce the number of
      toads.

      "Our approach is, people have to realise [it is] a very long-term
      approach and what we're trying will not be available to stop the cane
      toads moving right now," he said.

      This sounds like the next step on from the Betaglobin research, see
      http://www.csiro.au/promos/ozadvances/Series15Cane.htm

      Steve








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    • Pets R Us
      I certainly hope they are succesfull. I m a bit surprised at the bit about them moving into WA from SA. I ve never heard of toads being in SA, has anyone else?
      Message 2 of 4 , Sep 1, 2004
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        I certainly hope they are succesfull. I'm a bit surprised at the bit about them moving into WA from SA. I've never heard of toads being in SA, has anyone else?
        Cheers Scoot
        ----- Original Message -----
        From: stephen.weir@...
        To: australianfrogs@yahoogroups.com ; australianherps@yahoogroups.com
        Sent: Wednesday, September 01, 2004 1:00 PM
        Subject: [australianherps] Cane Toad Research


        From http://www.abc.net.au/news/newsitems/200408/s1188794.htm

        Last Update: Tuesday, August 31, 2004. 12:19pm (AEST)

        The CSIRO is working on a genetic virus that will kill cane toads. (Reuters)

        Virus aims to stop cane toad march
        The CSIRO says it is developing a genetic virus that will kill cane toads as they develop from tadpoles.

        Earlier this week, the Federal Government warned that Western Australia is facing an invasion by cane toads migrating from South Australia and the Northern Territory.

        The national science body says the virus will act as a vehicle for a genetic trigger that causes the cane toads to stop developing and die when they are in their tadpole phase.

        CSIRO research scientist Tony Robinson says the development of the virus will take at least 10 years, but once introduced it will cut their numbers effectively.

        Mr Robinson says the CSIRO is developing long-term solutions that will tie in with current efforts by other agencies to reduce the number of toads.

        "Our approach is, people have to realise [it is] a very long-term approach and what we're trying will not be available to stop the cane toads moving right now," he said.

        This sounds like the next step on from the Betaglobin research, see http://www.csiro.au/promos/ozadvances/Series15Cane.htm

        Steve





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      • stephen.weir@csiro.au
        The cynics might say because of a lack of commitment by governments. Those more kind may say because the knowledge and technology did not exist to do what they
        Message 3 of 4 , Sep 1, 2004
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          The cynics might say because of a lack of commitment by governments.

          Those more kind may say because the knowledge and technology did not exist to do what they are attempting.

          Me? I think the reason lies between the two.

          IMO, Cane Toads, for all their not-so-good looks and invasive nature, are not in the top few greatest environmental threats facing this country. Habitat degradation, exotic diseases, and other feral animals (cats, foxes, fish, buffalo) wreak far more long term damage and some can be directly blamed for extinctions. Still be good to curb their spread or even reduce their distribution.

          Steve

          > -----Original Message-----
          > From: Stu [mailto:nezbit@...]
          > Sent: Wednesday, 1 September 2004 16:56
          > To: australianherps@yahoogroups.com
          > Subject: RE: [australianherps] Cane Toad Research
          >
          >
          > Seems to me, it might be too little too late.
          >
          > Why wasn't this done ten years ago.
          >
          > Stu
          >
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