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Re: A Murray River Issue

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  • expansa1
    G Day Richard, We breed several species of turtle each year. The thing you need to look at is your filtration. If you have a canister filter on the tank it
    Message 1 of 8 , Apr 30, 2002
      G'Day Richard,

      We breed several species of turtle each year. The thing you need to
      look at is your filtration. If you have a canister filter on the
      tank it can sometimes be the source of the problem. If the flow
      rate is reduced, the filter is dominated by bacteria that don't
      require oxygen. These bacteria take over from the 'good bacteria'
      and the waste produced is Hydrogen sulphide (I think), which smells
      like rotten egg gas. This sends the pH plummeting as it is a form of
      acid. If you have a canister filter, you need to clean it more
      frequently, up to once per week to prevent this reaction. Also, try
      increasing the Carbonate Hardness (KH) of the water, this buffers the
      pH so it does not fluctuate so dramatically. The KH can be increased
      using calcium carbonate or Carbonate Hardness Generator from an
      aquarium shop. The turtles will also benefit from the additional
      calcium in the water. There is another product called CYCLE, which
      is a 'good bacteria' suppliment. If you add this to the tank it will
      help get it back on track a lot faster.

      For more information on Turtle keeping you could take a look at
      http://groups.yahoo.com/group/AustralianFreshwaterTurtlesandFrogs/
      group. There is a File section that contains a care sheet that may
      be of use to you.

      Best of luck,

      Gabrielle and Craig Latta
    • Emma
      Hi Richard, The Murray turtles need greens in their diet, the older they get the more they eat. I feed mine on the nature weed I drag out the murray river
      Message 2 of 8 , May 2, 2002
        Hi Richard,
        The Murray turtles need greens in their diet, the older they get the more
        they eat. I feed mine on the nature weed I drag out the murray river
        everytime I go up at weekends. If you can find something similar it would
        help. Mine devour it faster than you can blink and prefer it to meat.

        Also, as murrays get older, unlike the ELN's, they tend to spend more time
        out of the water. Most people I know think turtles spend their entire
        lifetime in the water. It's not true, captive breed turtles do but it is
        detrimental to their shells. Wild turtles spend a lot of time out of the
        water and hibernate by digging a hole and burying themselves.

        It's hard to keep the two species together as they require slightly
        different habitats.
        Re the food you can buy frozen turtle blocks that are 50% veggies but it's
        just as easy to make it up yourself.
        The shell sounds ok but you need to watch out for it looking more like a
        pyramid than rounded. That means over feeding. Also it is light in colour
        it is a problem, they should be dark green.

        Like others have mentioned check out the filter and sort out the ph. To be
        honest I have never checked the ph in my tank, I put in those turtle blocks
        and the turtles went all funny so I took them out and now I used algae
        eaters instead (the blocks will kill these fish within a couple of
        hours). Becareful though as occassionally one will go missing :)

        Regards,
        Emma




        At 11:18 PM 30/04/2002, you wrote:
        >Dear Herps,
        >
        >By way of introduction, my name is Richard Broome, a Victorian
        >resident who has an Eastern Long Neck and a Murray River turtle.
        >Unfortunately, I also have a problem...
        >
        >His shell, while slightly pitted appears quite alright. The vets
        >verdict on the shell was to give it a clean bill of health.
        >
        >As a side note: At a point in the past, we used to have a large
        >amount of pebble material at the bottom of the tank. During this
        >time, it was noted that the ELN would routinely bite the Murray but
        >as soon as a the pebbles were removed it appeared that the ELN could
        >now recognise the Murray and left it alone. Very strange and it took
        >a long time to work out unfortunately.
        >
        >So, I am left at a loss as to why the Murray now no longer wishes to
        >eat. He will sometimes bite at the food, munch on it but spit it out
        >rather than swallow.
        >
        >Any thoughts you might have would be greatly appreciated!
        >
        >Best Regards,
        >
        >Richard Broome
      • M. Halliger
        Hello Richard, I have kept turtles/tortoises for many years and kept red eared sliders when I was living in Europe. Here I have both long necks and murray
        Message 3 of 8 , May 2, 2002
          Hello Richard,
          I have kept turtles/tortoises for many years and kept red eared sliders
          when I was living in Europe. Here I have both long necks and murray short
          necks although they are in an outside enclosure. I used to keep them
          inside in a fish tank. My advise would be to forget about the filter for
          a while. I know it is a hassle without it as the water becomes dirty very
          quickly. However, it gives you a chance to monitor how long it takes for
          the water to be too dirty and thus change it. A filter usually only
          removes the stuff that makes the water cloudy but it does not remove any
          dissolved chemicals which are usually more harmful.
          Another thing I would do is change its diet.
          I have has great success with the following recipe:
          400 g of lean mince (heart or beef etc)
          1 egg
          100 g green leafy vegetables like lettuce or silver beet
          1 table spoon of Wombaroo reptile supplement
          1 table spoon of calcium carbonate

          I put all that through a food processor or blender. About 400 ml of water
          and 50 g of gelatine are then mixed and heated until the gelatine is
          dissolved. Then I stir in the food mixture and let everything set ( comes
          out a bit like brawn). I cut it up into portion size pieces and freeze
          individual portions. When I need to feed (every second or third day) I
          defrost what I need and cut the portion into bite size pieces which I
          feed. The turtles/tortoises love it and are doing well. I got that recipe
          from Taronga Zoo who used to use it for sick tortoises.
          Please email if you need more info. All the best and I hope the critters
          will be ok.

          Cheerio, Michael H. Cobar
        • cryptoman85
          ... sliders ... short ... them ... filter for ... dirty very ... takes for ... remove any ... water ... is ... comes ... freeze ... day) I ... I ... recipe ...
          Message 4 of 8 , May 26, 2002
            --- In australianherps@y..., "M. Halliger" <hallgm@c...> wrote:
            > Hello Richard,
            > I have kept turtles/tortoises for many years and kept red eared
            sliders
            > when I was living in Europe. Here I have both long necks and murray
            short
            > necks although they are in an outside enclosure. I used to keep
            them
            > inside in a fish tank. My advise would be to forget about the
            filter for
            > a while. I know it is a hassle without it as the water becomes
            dirty very
            > quickly. However, it gives you a chance to monitor how long it
            takes for
            > the water to be too dirty and thus change it. A filter usually only
            > removes the stuff that makes the water cloudy but it does not
            remove any
            > dissolved chemicals which are usually more harmful.
            > Another thing I would do is change its diet.
            > I have has great success with the following recipe:
            > 400 g of lean mince (heart or beef etc)
            > 1 egg
            > 100 g green leafy vegetables like lettuce or silver beet
            > 1 table spoon of Wombaroo reptile supplement
            > 1 table spoon of calcium carbonate
            >
            > I put all that through a food processor or blender. About 400 ml of
            water
            > and 50 g of gelatine are then mixed and heated until the gelatine
            is
            > dissolved. Then I stir in the food mixture and let everything set (
            comes
            > out a bit like brawn). I cut it up into portion size pieces and
            freeze
            > individual portions. When I need to feed (every second or third
            day) I
            > defrost what I need and cut the portion into bite size pieces which
            I
            > feed. The turtles/tortoises love it and are doing well. I got that
            recipe
            > from Taronga Zoo who used to use it for sick tortoises.
            > Please email if you need more info. All the best and I hope the
            critters
            > will be ok.
            >
            > Cheerio, Michael H. Cobar

            hello michel my name is Daniel and i keep murray short necked turtles
            i was just wondering how old do murray short necks have to be to breed
            i was told ten years at least what do you think?.thanks
            Daniel Bloom
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