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How deep is a hole?

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  • Mark K
    G day All, I m in the design stage of modelling an open sided loco shed with timber framing under a corrugated iron roof and a lean-to. Cheap on materials,
    Message 1 of 7 , Mar 2 2:26 AM
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      G'day All,
      I'm in the design stage of modelling an open sided loco shed with timber
      framing under a corrugated iron roof and a lean-to. Cheap on materials,
      simple shapes and plenty of character. A hopefully simple first large
      structure.

      I want to include a maintenance pit for loco servicing.

      How deep are some prototype pits? I don't expect a person to be able to
      stand up in a pit used for small narrow gauge loco's, but is there a
      precedence for any particular depth?
      It will be either brick or stone lined, built in the 1900's

      Thanks in advance,
      Mark K
      Sydney Oz


      [Non-text portions of this message have been removed]
    • David R Axup
      G day Mark, The only loco maintenance pit I ever inspected was for 5 3 and it was deep enough to stand up in. I would have thought as a matter of
      Message 2 of 7 , Mar 2 3:03 AM
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        G'day Mark,

        The only loco maintenance pit I ever inspected was for 5' 3" and it was
        deep enough to stand up in. I would have thought as a matter of
        practicality that any pit you couldn't stand in would be a liability
        rather than an asset. Maintenance pits in other transport industries
        are all deep enough to take a standing mechanic.

        Cheers,

        David
        -----Original Message-----
        From: ausnarrowgauge@yahoogroups.com
        [mailto:ausnarrowgauge@yahoogroups.com] On Behalf Of Mark K
        Sent: Thursday, 2 March 2006 9:26 PM
        To: ausnarrowgauge@yahoogroups.com
        Subject: [ausnarrowgauge] How deep is a hole?

        G'day All,
        I'm in the design stage of modelling an open sided loco shed with timber
        framing under a corrugated iron roof and a lean-to. Cheap on materials,
        simple shapes and plenty of character. A hopefully simple first large
        structure.

        I want to include a maintenance pit for loco servicing.

        How deep are some prototype pits? I don't expect a person to be able to
        stand up in a pit used for small narrow gauge loco's, but is there a
        precedence for any particular depth?
        It will be either brick or stone lined, built in the 1900's

        Thanks in advance,
        Mark K
        Sydney Oz


        [Non-text portions of this message have been removed]



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        [Non-text portions of this message have been removed]
      • Ken Clark
        ... able to ... Mark Ken s photos placed a photo of an open air inspection pit, located on the 3ft gauge Cuzco & Santa Anna in Peru, line to Machu Pichu. If
        Message 3 of 7 , Mar 2 9:58 AM
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          --- In ausnarrowgauge@yahoogroups.com, "Mark K" <trainbrain@...>
          wrote:

          > I want to include a maintenance pit for loco servicing.
          >
          > How deep are some prototype pits? I don't expect a person to be
          able to
          > stand up in a pit used for small narrow gauge loco's, but is there a
          > precedence for any particular depth?
          > It will be either brick or stone lined, built in the 1900's
          >
          > Thanks in advance,
          > Mark K
          > Sydney Oz
          >
          Mark
          "Ken's photos" placed a photo of an open air inspection pit,
          located on the 3ft gauge Cuzco & Santa Anna in Peru, line to
          Machu Pichu. If memory is correct depth was 4ft 6in. A set of
          HO plans I have show a depth of 4ft 9in for the Sterling Co engine
          house kit.

          Ken Clark
          Calgary Ab
          GWN
        • charles schuster
          Re : Queanbeyan Yard Mark, Hi! I was over at the old Queanbeyan freight yard looking for the freight weighbridge and details for an O scale model being
          Message 4 of 7 , Mar 7 1:40 PM
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            Re :
            Queanbeyan Yard

            Mark,
            Hi!
            I was over at the old Queanbeyan freight yard looking for the freight
            weighbridge and details for an "O" scale model being planned by David
            Pallas and Phil Badger.
            No joy!
            However, I did stumble across a rustic ash/inspection pit on what
            the ARHS guys called the "Fettler's Siding" that runs behind the
            Cooma-Canberra Junction Signal Box in front of the long Ganger's
            Trolley shed.
            The pit was not lined and the rail was supported on massive, rough
            hewn, bridge timbers in surprisingly good condition..
            Unusual was the drainage. There are inlet and outlet culvert rain
            water drains in the bottom of the pit.
            I feel that it could be simple to "narrow gauge" the pit.
            I am surprised that such an open pit has survived unfilled. It looks
            as if it has not been used for a long time.
            If any one are interested I can get over again soon,do some basic
            measurements and take some pictures.

            Regards,

            Charles.




            --- In ausnarrowgauge@yahoogroups.com, "Mark K" <trainbrain@...>
            wrote:
            >
            > G'day All,
            > I'm in the design stage of modelling an open sided loco shed with
            timber
            > framing under a corrugated iron roof and a lean-to. Cheap on
            materials,
            > simple shapes and plenty of character. A hopefully simple first
            large
            > structure.
            >
            > I want to include a maintenance pit for loco servicing.
            >
            > How deep are some prototype pits? I don't expect a person to be
            able to
            > stand up in a pit used for small narrow gauge loco's, but is there a
            > precedence for any particular depth?
            > It will be either brick or stone lined, built in the 1900's
            >
            > Thanks in advance,
            > Mark K
            > Sydney Oz
            >
            >
            > [Non-text portions of this message have been removed]
            >
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