Loading ...
Sorry, an error occurred while loading the content.

Re: Sunday Morning Records

Expand Messages
  • whozza_bunyip2
    ... Mine does... and it makes me a little uncomfortable, actually.
    Message 1 of 48 , Jul 1, 2003
    • 0 Attachment
      --- In augiemarch@yahoogroups.com, "Daniel Beattie"
      <thanks4thememes@y...> wrote:
      > Glenn hits those high notes in his falsetto register, so why
      > shouldn't we? (Falsetto doesn't exactly carry well over a crowded
      > city street, but what choice do we have?
      >

      Mine does... and it makes me a little uncomfortable, actually.
    • Lisa Lee
      True. Chaucer I have always found pretty intimidating a prospect. I personally have not had the gumption to tackle Canterbury Tales yet. Tend to appreciate
      Message 48 of 48 , Jun 5, 2008
      • 0 Attachment
        True. Chaucer I have always found pretty intimidating a prospect. I
        personally have not had the gumption to tackle Canterbury Tales yet.
        Tend to appreciate Shakespeare's plays more on stage, but sonnets on
        page.

        --- In augiemarch@yahoogroups.com, Ada Lam <adahylam@...> wrote:
        >
        > Each to their own. I have to say it's been at least fifteen years
        since
        > I've tried to wrangle Chaucer - however, I definitely find it
        easier
        > (and more pleasant) to listen to Shakespeare than read it.
        >
        > Rebecca Barton wrote:
        > >
        > > Hey, thanks you guys for reminding me I have to book tickets to
        the
        > > Canterbury Tales adaptation/play thingy they're doing in
        Northbridge
        > > this weekend. Good timing :-)
        > >
        > > I've read (though wouldn't have a clue about this myself)
        Chaucer's
        > > writings get used to study how vowel sounds used to be pronounced
        in
        > > middle english by looking at what he rhymes with. Once you've got
        the
        > > pronunciations right, reading is so much easier than listening to
        it.
        > > IMO...
        > >
        > > *From:* augiemarch@yahoogroups.com
        [mailto:augiemarch@yahoogroups.com]
        > > *On Behalf Of *Aurora
        > > *Sent:* Thursday, 5 June 2008 2:15 PM
        > > *To:* augiemarch@yahoogroups.com
        > > *Subject:* Re: [augiemarch] Re: (OT) Canterbury Tales r ant...
        > >
        > > FYI, Pasolini adapted Canterbury Tales to the big screen. Perhaps
        Mel
        > > Gibson should as well, Lord knows he'd be *thrilled* to have a go
        at
        > > "The Prioress's Tale".
        > >
        > > On 6/5/08, *trinabenina* <trinabenina@...
        > > <mailto:trinabenina@...>> wrote:
        > >
        > > Really? I'm the opposite, it makes so much more sense to read it
        than
        > > try and follow it when spoken.
        > >
        > > Yes, I know, this thread is five years old, but I thought I'd add
        to
        > > it anyway
        > >
        > > --- In augiemarch@yahoogroups.com
        > > <mailto:augiemarch%40yahoogroups.com>, Ada Lam <augie@> wrote:
        > > >
        > > > I think it's interesting how 'old' English is a lot more
        comprehensible
        > > > when spoken than when it's read... for example, watching
        Shakespeare in
        > > > its original language is relatively easy; reading Shakespeare
        is a pain
        > > > and a half. Same for Chaucer/The Canterbury Tales - we studied
        it for a
        > > > short period of time, by reading it aloud rather than simply
        trying to
        > > > read it on the page.
        > > >
        > > > Ada
        > > >
        > > > On Wed, 2003-06-25 at 14:24, Tim Weekes wrote:
        > > > > > How close is Shallow Grave to The Pardoner's Tale?
        > > > >
        > > > > It is much closer to "The Pardoner's Tale" than "A Simple
        > > > > Plan"...I'd like to see someone turn "The Canterbury Tales"
        into a
        > > > > movie...and keep it in Middle English...that would be real
        class.
        > > > > Hell, they're letting Mel Gibson waste...I mean...*SPEND* 40
        million
        > > > > on his Jesus biopic...and that's entirely in Latin...and
        think about
        > > > > it - who was the better writer: God or Geoffrey Chaucer...pah-
        > > > > lease...
        > > > >
        > > > > tim w.
        > > > >
        > > > >
        > >
        > >
        >
      Your message has been successfully submitted and would be delivered to recipients shortly.