Loading ...
Sorry, an error occurred while loading the content.

Re: [atm_free] Awful quiet these days...

Expand Messages
  • William Byrd
    Something! There, someone said it. I don t have anything going until I get a mirror back from being figured. Then I ll start building my final ATM
    Message 1 of 15 , Aug 5, 2004
    • 0 Attachment
      "Something!" There, someone said it. <g>

      I don't have anything going until I get a mirror back from being figured.
      Then I'll start building my final ATM project. The mirror is an 18.75" f/5.3
      cellular. Lightweight and long focal length. The design is going to be sort
      of a minimalist truss dob with tracking to be added later. Not sure how it
      will turn out but it should be an interesting project!!
      Bill in SA

      ----- Original Message -----
      From: "Ken Hunter" <atm_ken_hunter@...>
      To: <atm_free@yahoogroups.com>
      Sent: Friday, August 06, 2004 8:07 AM
      Subject: [atm_free] Awful quiet these days...


      > Somebody say something!
      >
    • Ken Hunter
      Somebody say something! Ken Hunter
      Message 2 of 15 , Aug 6, 2004
      • 0 Attachment
        Somebody say something!

        Ken Hunter
      • Jan van Gastel
        Well, Ken, you just did, hello.. Not much to say. Today I made new wheelblocks for my 20 inch Dob. Since I computorized the scope, I can t use the handbarrows
        Message 3 of 15 , Aug 6, 2004
        • 0 Attachment
          Well, Ken, you just did, hello..

          Not much to say. Today I made new wheelblocks for my 20 inch Dob. Since I
          computorized the scope, I can't use the handbarrows any more. I have to
          disassemble everything to be able to get in in my Combo. Takes about half an
          our. So now I made four blocks, each having one wheel, which can very easily
          be attached to the scope. Now I only need to take the secondary cage and the
          trusses from the scope and ride the rest into the car. Takes about 10-15
          minutes I think.

          Jan
          http://home.wanadoo.nl/jhm.vangastel/Astronomy/

          ----- Original Message -----
          From: "Ken Hunter" <atm_ken_hunter@...>
          To: <atm_free@yahoogroups.com>
          Sent: Friday, August 06, 2004 5:07 PM
          Subject: [atm_free] Awful quiet these days...


          > Somebody say something!
          >
          > Ken Hunter
          >
          >
          >
          >
          >
          >
          >
          > Yahoo! Groups Links
          >
          >
          >
          >
          >
        • starzkey
          Ok, here is something that may interest fellow ATM s planning on a visit to Stellafane this year: I will be giving a talk Saturday afternoon at 2 P.M. on the
          Message 4 of 15 , Aug 6, 2004
          • 0 Attachment
            Ok, here is something that may interest fellow ATM's planning on a
            visit to Stellafane this year: I will be giving a talk Saturday
            afternoon at 2 P.M. on the optical design for a 32" F/6 all
            spherical relay cassegrain that I and a friend are in the process of
            building. I mention it here because the Stellafane convention
            bulletin doesn't, as I am a last minute "fill in" for a previously
            scheduled speaker that had to back out.

            Scott Milligan
          • William Byrd
            Hi Glenn! ... your ... This is a little extreme but I love the way it looks. Some light control pieces will be needed for most of the places I observe. See pic
            Message 5 of 15 , Aug 6, 2004
            • 0 Attachment
              Hi Glenn!

              ----- Original Message -----

              > Hi Listers.
              > I have a 18 inch Newt and need a good mount. Do you have plans Bill for
              your
              > mount?

              This is a little extreme but I love the way it looks. Some light control
              pieces will be needed for most of the places I observe. See pic at this
              small URL:
              http://littleurl.com/?01m2
              Bill
            • Glenn Burgess
              Hi Listers. I have a 18 inch Newt and need a good mount. Do you have plans Bill for your mount? Can I see or get a copy, please. Currently using copy of a GEM
              Message 6 of 15 , Aug 6, 2004
              • 0 Attachment
                Hi Listers.
                I have a 18 inch Newt and need a good mount. Do you have plans Bill for your
                mount?
                Can I see or get a copy, please.
                Currently using copy of a GEM but considering wedge/fork mounts. Eg Beacon
                Hill and Mead Gigawedge.
                I am impressed with the stability of the dob versus what I have.
                Glenn Burgess
                Auckland
                New Zealand




                The design is going to be sort
                of a minimalist truss dob with tracking to be added later.
                Bill in SA
              • William Byrd
                Hmmm...worked first try for me. Here s the full thing...cut and paste to get it into the address line:
                Message 7 of 15 , Aug 6, 2004
                • 0 Attachment
                  Hmmm...worked first try for me. Here's the full thing...cut and paste to get
                  it into the address line:

                  http://www.galaxyoptics.com/GalaxyOpticsSKYOBSERVATORYwiththeSKY18Telescope.html

                  Bill in SA


                  ----- Original Message ----- > Thanks but no luck opening the url!
                • Woodchuck
                  ... After many years absence, I m back into mirror grinding, and intend to make a machine. I m looking for suggestions and specifications. I have on hand:
                  Message 8 of 15 , Aug 7, 2004
                  • 0 Attachment
                    On Fri, 6 Aug 2004, Ken Hunter wrote:

                    > Somebody say something!
                    >
                    > Ken Hunter

                    After many years absence, I'm back into mirror grinding, and intend
                    to make a machine. I'm looking for suggestions and specifications.
                    I have on hand:

                    Tools: 9" SB lathe. 7" Atlas shaper. Floor drill press. 16"
                    bandsaw. 8" table saw. The relevant small stuff. Plenty of
                    woodworking tools and woodworking skills.

                    Materials: two 1/4hp 90VDC motors with BEEL SCR controllers and
                    worm gear reducers, giving 44 and 120 rpm each. A couple of large
                    (16" and some smaller ones) cast iron lathe faceplates. Pulleys:
                    4" (2), 6" (3), 12" (2), all cast iron. Am scheming to get idlers
                    and some ~3" pulleys for the first stage. All pulleys are 2-V
                    except the 12's. Will acquire relevant bearings, bushings and
                    shafting as required.

                    Design specs: to handle at largest a nominal 14" blank. To perform
                    all functions from edging and roughing to final figuring.

                    Projected design: I'd like to do this with a Zeiss-type machine,
                    with independent stroke and cross-throw speeds.

                    Questions etc...

                    1) Is the Zeiss as viable as I think? Do I get anything I wouldn't
                    get from an Elgin? Should I even consider a Draper? Space is not
                    a major consideration.

                    2) In order to handle 14" nominal blanks, what are your recommendations
                    for maximum stroke length, i.e. for the diameter of the crank wheel
                    for stroke? Clearly 14" is the maximum sane diameter, but what is
                    really needed?

                    3) Likewise for the cross-throw.

                    4) The plan is to drive the table from the cross-throw. Is this optimum?
                    I have other motors but am loathe to complicate things beyond two.
                    Driving the table from the cross-throw decouples it from the stroke,
                    of course.

                    5) What sort of speed ranges should I have for table, stroke and cross-throw,
                    given that this is a soup-to-nuts machine? (I will have some sort of
                    add-on rig for edging, but wish to use this machine and its turntable.)

                    6) Do the usual sort of ball-bearing flange bearings have the design
                    to properly take the thrust load of grinding? Tapered roller flange
                    bearings (or similar designs) are not easy to find cheap, and cheap
                    matters. What are good alternatives for taking the thrust load of
                    the table shaft? What is a proper shaft size? I am considering
                    a 1" solid hardened shaft, but it seems "unoptimal". I feel constrained
                    (by available pulleys already in inventory) to 1.25 or 1.5" D max
                    for the shaft. Will I rue the day I decided that? Should I be
                    going to a 2" or larger (hollow) shaft?

                    7) I understand the degrees of freedom for this machine to be
                    as follows:

                    a) ratio of cross-throw spindle to table spindle rpm
                    b) ratio of cross-throw spindle to stroke spindle rpm
                    c) length of stroke
                    d) length of cross-throw
                    e) radial offset of stroke, i.e. extended line of stroke passes
                    over center of work, but stroke is assymmetric.
                    f) lateral offset of stroke, i.e. extended line of stroke
                    does not pass over center of work.

                    In the usual Zeiss design, there might be a (g), ratio of tool
                    rotation to one of the other speeds, the tool being driven. I
                    intend the tool to be free to rotate. (e) and (f) are notional,
                    and are the result of adjusting (c) and (d) and the static position
                    of the drive pin. (e) and (f) are direct physical adjustments on
                    an Elgin or Draper, however. This I see as a Zeiss drawback: the
                    notional degrees of freedom [customary because of the long and
                    widespread use of Elgin/Draper designs] and the machine adjustments
                    are not the same. I might design the Zeiss to have the offsets
                    as direct adjustments, but the result might be a Damned Folly,
                    if you know what I mean.

                    Well, that should be something to break the silence :-) I solicit
                    any and all comments, giving thanks for them in advance.

                    I'm in Bedford, PA; any neighbors on the list?

                    Dave
                  • RON WHITE
                    Dave There is too many designs for me to recommend any as best, However –use chain drive instead of pulleys- Many people figure with a machine, my machine
                    Message 9 of 15 , Aug 7, 2004
                    • 0 Attachment

                      Dave

                      There is too many designs for me to recommend any as best, However �use chain drive instead of pulleys-

                      Many people figure with a machine, my machine can do a classic W pattern but I find it easier to finish by hand. The learning curve for machine figuring may not be worth the effort�most figuring time is testing and waiting not pushing.

                       

                      My machine runs very slow about the same as a patient barrel walker.

                      The table turns 1/3 to 1/6 RPM with 18 strokes across the table per turn. Many other machines turn up to 40 or more RPM with very good results.

                      I find the smoothness achieved is well worth the extra time it may take ( I really don�t think mine polishes any slower than a fast machine.

                      ATMers and pros that use the fast turning machines get excellent results. I think the key is just learning the machine.

                      Check my reply to James on pumps for the slurry / grit.  With my machine and auto pump I can generate the curve and start polishing a 16� mirror in less than 5 days. I run the polish operation 24 hours a day MOT for as long as it takes- 2 to 2/1/2 days with a bit of luck. All this while I show up to work at my real job and sleep at night.

                      Figuring is by hand with a lot of testing � hour or less pushing the glass and maybe 2 hours a day total time it can take me many weeks or even months to finish a mirror.

                       

                      I turn a 35" X 1 1/2" thick aluminum table,  shafts are 3/4" I don't have a central shaft but 1" od steel or brass tube works good- I use cheap floating type pillow blocks for bearings and one 1/4 HP 12 RPM gear motor for power. the fewer parts you use the better. and if you bend a 3/4" drive shaft something  is real wrong.

                       

                      Hope this helps a bit

                      Ron White



                      Woodchuck <djv@...> wrote:
                      On Fri, 6 Aug 2004, Ken Hunter wrote:

                      > Somebody say something!
                      >
                      > Ken Hunter

                      After many years absence, I'm back into mirror grinding, and intend
                      to make a machine. I'm looking for suggestions and specifications.
                      I have on hand:

                      Tools: 9" SB lathe. 7" Atlas shaper. Floor drill press. 16"
                      bandsaw. 8" table saw. The relevant small stuff. Plenty of
                      woodworking tools and woodworking skills.

                      Materials: two 1/4hp 90VDC motors with BEEL SCR controllers and
                      worm gear reducers, giving 44 and 120 rpm each. A couple of large
                      (16" and some smaller ones) cast iron lathe faceplates. Pulleys:
                      4" (2), 6" (3), 12" (2), all cast iron. Am scheming to get idlers
                      and some ~3" pulleys for the first stage. All pulleys are 2-V
                      except the 12's. Will acquire relevant bearings, bushings and
                      shafting as required.

                      Design specs: to handle at largest a nominal 14" blank. To perform
                      all functions from edging and roughing to final figuring.

                      Projected design: I'd like to do this with a Zeiss-type machine,
                      with independent stroke and cross-throw speeds.

                      Questions etc...

                      1) Is the Zeiss as viable as I think? Do I get anything I wouldn't
                      get from an Elgin? Should I even consider a Draper? Space is not
                      a major consideration.

                      2) In order to handle 14" nominal blanks, what are your recommendations
                      for maximum stroke length, i.e. for the diameter of the crank wheel
                      for stroke? Clearly 14" is the maximum sane diameter, but what is
                      really needed?

                      3) Likewise for the cross-throw.

                      4) The plan is to drive the table from the cross-throw. Is this optimum?
                      I have other motors but am loathe to complicate things beyond two.
                      Driving the table from the cross-throw decouples it from the stroke,
                      of course.

                      5) What sort of speed ranges should I have for table, stroke and cross-throw,
                      given that this is a soup-to-nuts machine? (I will have some sort of
                      add-on rig for edging, but wish to use this machine and its turntable.)

                      6) Do the usual sort of ball-bearing flange bearings have the design
                      to properly take the thrust load of grinding? Tapered roller flange
                      bearings (or similar designs) are not easy to find cheap, and cheap
                      matters. What are good alternatives for taking the thrust load of
                      the table shaft? What is a proper shaft size? I am considering
                      a 1" solid hardened shaft, but it seems "unoptimal". I feel constrained
                      (by available pulleys already in inventory) to 1.25 or 1.5" D max
                      for the shaft. Will I rue the day I decided that? Should I be
                      going to a 2" or larger (hollow) shaft?

                      7) I understand the degrees of freedom for this machine to be
                      as follows:

                      a) ratio of cross-throw spindle to table spindle rpm
                      b) ratio of cross-throw spindle to stroke spindle rpm
                      c) length of stroke
                      d) length of cross-throw
                      e) radial offset of stroke, i.e. extended line of stroke passes
                      over center of work, but stroke is assymmetric.
                      f) lateral offset of stroke, i.e. extended line of stroke
                      does not pass over center of work.

                      In the usual Zeiss design, there might be a (g), ratio of tool
                      rotation to one of the other speeds, the tool being driven. I
                      intend the tool to be free to rotate. (e) and (f) are notional,
                      and are the result of adjusting (c) and (d) and the static position
                      of the drive pin. (e) and (f) are direct physical adjustments on
                      an Elgin or Draper, however. This I see as a Zeiss drawback: the
                      notional degrees of freedom [customary because of the long and
                      widespread use of Elgin/Draper designs] and the machine adjustments
                      are not the same. I might design the Zeiss to have the offsets
                      as direct adjustments, but the result might be a Damned Folly,
                      if you know what I mean.

                      Well, that should be something to break the silence :-) I solicit
                      any and all comments, giving thanks for them in advance.

                      I'm in Bedford, PA; any neighbors on the list?

                      Dave



                      ------------------------ Yahoo! Groups Sponsor --------------------~-->
                      Make a clean sweep of pop-up ads. Yahoo! Companion Toolbar.
                      Now with Pop-Up Blocker. Get it for free!
                      http://us.click.yahoo.com/L5YrjA/eSIIAA/yQLSAA/o_XolB/TM
                      --------------------------------------------------------------------~->


                      Yahoo! Groups Links

                      <*> To visit your group on the web, go to:
                      http://groups.yahoo.com/group/atm_free/

                      <*> To unsubscribe from this group, send an email to:
                      atm_free-unsubscribe@yahoogroups.com

                      <*> Your use of Yahoo! Groups is subject to:
                      http://docs.yahoo.com/info/terms/


                    • Richard Schwartz
                      What can I say? ... From: Ken Hunter To: Sent: Friday, August 06, 2004 8:07 AM Subject: [atm_free]
                      Message 10 of 15 , Aug 7, 2004
                      • 0 Attachment
                        What can I say?

                        ----- Original Message -----
                        From: "Ken Hunter" <atm_ken_hunter@...>
                        To: <atm_free@yahoogroups.com>
                        Sent: Friday, August 06, 2004 8:07 AM
                        Subject: [atm_free] Awful quiet these days...


                        > Somebody say something!
                        >
                        > Ken Hunter
                        >
                        >
                        >
                        >
                        >
                        >
                        >
                        > Yahoo! Groups Links
                        >
                        >
                        >
                        >
                        >
                        >
                      • Glenn Burgess
                        Bill, Thanks but no luck opening the url! Glenn ... From: William Byrd [mailto:web01@flash.net] Sent: Saturday, August 07, 2004 8:17 AM To:
                        Message 11 of 15 , Aug 7, 2004
                        • 0 Attachment
                          Bill,
                          Thanks but no luck opening the url!
                          Glenn



                          -----Original Message-----
                          From: William Byrd [mailto:web01@...]
                          Sent: Saturday, August 07, 2004 8:17 AM
                          To: atm_free@yahoogroups.com
                          Subject: Re: [atm_free] Awful quiet these days...


                          Hi Glenn!

                          ----- Original Message -----

                          > Hi Listers.
                          > I have a 18 inch Newt and need a good mount. Do you have plans Bill for
                          your
                          > mount?

                          This is a little extreme but I love the way it looks. Some light control
                          pieces will be needed for most of the places I observe. See pic at this
                          small URL:
                          http://littleurl.com/?01m2
                          Bill






                          Yahoo! Groups Links
                        • Woodchuck
                          ... I ll take that under advisement, but I ve got the pile of pulleys already. I suppose the advantage of chain is positive drive/less hp loss to friction? ...
                          Message 12 of 15 , Aug 9, 2004
                          • 0 Attachment
                            On Sat, 7 Aug 2004, RON WHITE wrote:
                            >
                            > Dave
                            >
                            > There is too many designs for me to recommend any as best, However –use chain drive instead of pulleys-

                            I'll take that under advisement, but I've got the pile of pulleys already.
                            I suppose the advantage of chain is positive drive/less hp loss to friction?

                            > Many people figure with a machine, my machine can do a classic W pattern but I find it easier to finish by hand. The learning curve for machine figuring may not be worth the effort—most figuring time is testing and waiting not pushing.

                            As it was written in the early ATM books, what's a hobby for, if not
                            to waste time? I look forward, actually, to messing around with the
                            machine.

                            > My machine runs very slow about the same as a patient barrel walker.
                            >
                            > The table turns 1/3 to 1/6 RPM with 18 strokes across the table per turn. Many other machines turn up to 40 or more RPM with very good results.

                            That gives a stroke/table ratio of 18, hmmm, for 5 rpm table, that
                            would be a 90 Hz stroke rate. (Translating to the terms I think in.)
                            Yeah, that's ballpark for what I was planning.

                            > I find the smoothness achieved is well worth the extra time it may take ( I really don’t think mine polishes any slower than a fast machine.

                            You may be right. Except for small lenses polished by spinning, I
                            have the intuition that the time spent polishing is the same, manual
                            or machine, if one ignores the rests that the manual polisher takes
                            and the machine doesn't, and that slow vs fast machine polishing
                            speeds may only weakly depend on speed. (Assuming pitch+rouge/CeO
                            in all cases). Too fast a machine and maybe the pitch/rouge doesn't
                            "bite" as well. I know when working by hand, slow and sure seemed
                            to give the better result, the drag of the polisher became heavier,
                            and the feel more "silken", for want of a better term, meaning it
                            seemed to be making excellent contact, and there was no "suction"
                            or "hydroplaning" going on.

                            > ATMers and pros that use the fast turning machines get excellent results. I think the key is just learning the machine.

                            This seems to be the case.

                            > Check my reply to James on pumps for the slurry / grit. With my machine and auto pump I can generate the curve and start polishing a 16” mirror in less than 5 days. I run the polish operation 24 hours a day MOT for as long as it takes- 2 to 2/1/2 days with a bit of luck. All this while I show up to work at my real job and sleep at night.

                            I may go with a pump, but being retired, I don't have a real j*b anymore.

                            > Figuring is by hand with a lot of testing ½ hour or less pushing the glass and maybe 2 hours a day total time it can take me many weeks or even months to finish a mirror.
                            >
                            >
                            >
                            > I turn a 35" X 1 1/2" thick aluminum table, shafts are 3/4" I don't have a central shaft but 1" od steel or brass tube works good- I use cheap floating type pillow blocks for bearings and one 1/4 HP 12 RPM gear motor for power. the fewer parts you use the better. and if you bend a 3/4" drive shaft something is real wrong.

                            Agree. What are you using for the table bearings? You've had good
                            results with cheap pillow blocks, are these the Asian (Chicom/India)
                            ones that seem to flood Ebay? I have a couple of those, they *seem*
                            already, although not finished to Dodge/Sealmaster/Link-Belt
                            standards, of course.

                            > Hope this helps a bit

                            Yes, thanks, Ron. I've not exactly stimulated a torrent of other
                            posts, I see ;-) There appears to be something amiss with the list.
                            Vladimir has posted on the atm list that his post here just bounced;
                            we'll see, I guess, whether this one does, too.

                            Dave
                          • RON WHITE
                            ... My first machine used belts to slow the speed down so I have a ton of belts and sheaves if you need them just let me know what you need --The chain and
                            Message 13 of 15 , Aug 9, 2004
                            • 0 Attachment


                              > Dave

                              My first machine used belts to slow the speed down so I have a ton of belts and sheaves if you need them just let me know what you need --The chain and gear motor is the way to go, much smoother and way less prone to screwing up.

                              > The table turns 1/3 to 1/6 RPM with 18 strokes across the table per turn. Many other machines turn up to 40 or more RPM with very good results.

                              That gives a stroke/table ratio of 18, hmmm, for 5 rpm table, that
                              would be a 90 Hz stroke rate. (Translating to the terms I think in.)
                              Yeah, that's ballpark for what I was planning.

                              You may not want to bump up the stroke speed that much- my machine works on the stroke other machines turn faster and work on the off-set rotation for the action. If you bump up my #'s on both directions the surface speed may be to fast- remember that on fast turning machines the mirror is turning with the rotation --a bit slower so even if it is zooming along the actual surface speed between the tool and mirror is not that high. On my design the action is across the mirror- the mirror still follows the tool around at about 1/4 the table speed but the arm is pushing it at 1" per second actual surface speed--if you can adjust to get around the same actual surface speed between the tool and the mirror you will be in great shape. With small lenses this will be a much higher RPM and stroke speed but the surface speed is the key.


                              have the intuition that the time spent polishing is the same, manual
                              or machine, if one ignores the rests that the manual polisher takes
                              and the machine doesn't, and that slow vs fast machine polishing
                              speeds may only weakly depend on speed.

                              I have never finished a mirror as fast on the machine as the hand polishing times given at many web sites- So I assume that the actual time of tool to mirror is higher on the machine-- I may be adding the polish to often with the machine and slowing the action.

                              Too fast a machine and maybe the pitch/rouge doesn't
                              "bite" as well. I know when working by hand, slow and sure seemed
                              to give the better result, the drag of the polisher became heavier,
                              and the feel more "silken", for want of a better term, meaning it
                              seemed to be making excellent contact, and there was no "suction"
                              or "hydroplaning" going on.

                              I have tried extremely slow speeds on the machine-less than 1/2" per second for polishing-- the actual progress doesn�t seem to be much slower than at 1" per second--at faster speeds 2-3" per second the progress seems to be much slower. I think you are right about the hydroplaning

                               What are you using for the table bearings? You've had good
                              results with cheap pillow blocks, are these the Asian (Chicom/India)
                              ones that seem to flood Ebay? I have a couple of those, they *seem*
                              already, although not finished to Dodge/Sealmaster/Link-Belt
                              standards, of course.


                              My bearings are from Grainger�s, McMaster -Carr may be a better retail source, about $10.00 each. The bearing is retained in a sheet metal cup with a rubber sleeve so alignment is not a problem. The table floats on 1" conveyer type balls (9 point support) I rolled a rack gear into a circle around the outside of the table a pinion gear supplies the rotation. As well as back and forth movement. --A central pipe axel with 3 conveyer balls would work as well. I needed the extra floating support because I used the table as a tool to grind a 24" flat mirror.


                              Yes, thanks, Ron. I've not exactly stimulated a torrent of other
                              posts, I see ;-) There appears to be something amiss with the list.
                              Vladimir has posted on the atm list that his post here just bounced;
                              we'll see, I guess, whether this one does, too.

                              I've been meaning to send a note to Vladimir I had some sort of problem where I was on the bouncing list and somtimes missed posts. This can be corrected at the Yahoo Groups help site.--I noticed that Vladimir's name was on the bouncing members list as well---It is an easy fix if you notice you have a problem.

                              There is a Mirror-Matic group that may be helpful'

                              Ron White


                            • Ken Hunter
                              ... bounced; we ll see, I guess, whether this one does, too. ... I ve checked Vladimirs account and it seems OK, could see no reason for his attempt to bounce.
                              Message 14 of 15 , Aug 10, 2004
                              • 0 Attachment
                                --- In atm_free@yahoogroups.com, Woodchuck <djv@b...> wrote:

                                > Vladimir has posted on the atm list that his post here just
                                bounced; we'll see, I guess, whether this one does, too.
                                >
                                > Dave

                                I've checked Vladimirs account and it seems OK, could see no reason
                                for his attempt to bounce. It could be one of those Yahoo things we
                                endure occasionally. Even so, it's nice to have the service they
                                give us.

                                Ken Hunter
                                ATM_FREE owner
                              • Woodchuck
                                ... Yeah, no complaints here. I m always a bit amazed that yahoo s lists work as well as they do. They must have some really throbbing connectivity. Dave
                                Message 15 of 15 , Aug 10, 2004
                                • 0 Attachment
                                  On Tue, 10 Aug 2004, Ken Hunter wrote:

                                  > --- In atm_free@yahoogroups.com, Woodchuck <djv@b...> wrote:
                                  >
                                  > > Vladimir has posted on the atm list that his post here just
                                  > bounced; we'll see, I guess, whether this one does, too.
                                  > >
                                  > > Dave
                                  >
                                  > I've checked Vladimirs account and it seems OK, could see no reason
                                  > for his attempt to bounce. It could be one of those Yahoo things we
                                  > endure occasionally. Even so, it's nice to have the service they
                                  > give us.
                                  >
                                  > Ken Hunter
                                  > ATM_FREE owner

                                  Yeah, no complaints here. I'm always a bit amazed that yahoo's lists
                                  work as well as they do. They must have some really throbbing
                                  connectivity.

                                  Dave
                                Your message has been successfully submitted and would be delivered to recipients shortly.