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Re: [atm_free] New member and an off topic question

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  • brock.family
    Hi Mike. When looking at the woods did you rack the focuser in and out through the full extent of travel both with and without the extender tube? You may not
    Message 1 of 7 , Nov 1, 2009
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      Hi Mike.
      When looking at the woods did you rack the focuser in
      and out through the full extent of travel both with and without the
      extender tube? You may not have had it in focus. Another
      possibility is that the finder is out of adjustment. While the
      woods might have been in the finder the main scope may have
      been pointing to the sky above. Was the sky cloudy? That
      would explain the white. Try again but move the scope around more.

      Dave


      ----- Original Message -----
      From: "Mike Sloane" <mikesloane@...>
      To: <atm_free@yahoogroups.com>
      Sent: Sunday, November 01, 2009 10:52 AM
      Subject: [atm_free] New member and an off topic question


      > Thanks for having me. I was recently given a reflector telescope and
      > need some help setting it up. It is a "FieldVision" model 114 1000, and
      > it appears to be complete. It came with several eyepiece lenses, an
      > "extender tube" for the eyepieces, and a Barlow lens, but no
      > instructions. I pointed it at the woods about 100 yards away and
      > expected to see an inverted image, but all I see is white.

      > Mike
    • Furt
      Mike, Use the eyepiece with the biggest number (focal length) on it first. This will give you the lowest magnification which makes it easier to find things.
      Message 2 of 7 , Nov 1, 2009
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        Mike,

        Use the eyepiece with the biggest number (focal length) on it first. This will give you the lowest magnification which makes it easier to find things. Also, make sure that you are looking at something at least a block away. Sight down the edge of the tube to point it since the finder scope may be way off.

        --- In atm_free@yahoogroups.com, Mike Sloane <mikesloane@...> wrote:
        >
        > Thanks for having me. I was recently given a reflector telescope and
        > need some help setting it up. It is a "FieldVision" model 114 1000, and
        > it appears to be complete. It came with several eyepiece lenses, an
        > "extender tube" for the eyepieces, and a Barlow lens, but no
        > instructions. I replaced two broken control knobs/shafts and got it
        > working mechanically, but I have no idea how to set up all the controls
        > or how to even begin. I pointed it at the woods about 100 yards away and
        > expected to see an inverted image, but all I see is white. I understand
        > from my various "google" searches that the instructions for the unit
        > came on a CD, but I have had no luck trying to chase it down. I realize
        > that this might not be an especially good unit, but the price was right,
        > and I would like to "get my toe in the water" before spending real money
        > and time on a better unit.
        >
        > If anyone can give me some direction, I won't bother you any more with
        > this kind of question. I just didn't know where else to turn.
        >
        > Rather than clutter up the photo album, I put an image of the telescope
        > on my own album site:
        > <http://public.fotki.com/mikesloane/tools__equipment/fieldvision-reflect.html>
        >
        > Thanks for your help,
        >
        > Mike
        >
      • trulyyours05
        Hi Mike, No need to apologize for asking a question. I ve been doing astronomy for years and the members of this group still have to endure my questions. Your
        Message 3 of 7 , Nov 1, 2009
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          Hi Mike,
          No need to apologize for asking a question. I've been doing astronomy for years and the members of this group still have to endure my questions.

          Your description is a little strange when you say you see "white". With the telescope pointed at the woods you should see a blur, but not white. You say there were some broken parts. Are you sure the telescope is complete?

          The telescope will not focus closer than several hundred yards, so look at a distant target. Even if it is not collimated you should see something. Try to adjust the aim of your finder scope to match what you see in the telescope. Next, try to collimate it. Look at these web pages to get an idea: <http://telescopes.skymania.com/2007/09/how-to-collimate-telescope.html>, <http://telescopes.skymania.com/2007/09/how-to-collimate-telescope.html>.

          With your telescope a rough collimation will work well. I have one that is similar and used to collimate it without any tools and could get good airy disk results. You don't need to center spot the main mirror, just be sure the image of the main mirror is very well centered in the secondary mirror. It helps to align your eye for this if you insert something into the focuser like a plastic film can that has a small circular hole cut out of its bottom. Then, adjust the tilt of the main mirror so that the image of the secondary and the spider is well centered and you are looking straight back at the center of your own eye's pupil. Play around with it and you should have success. Good luck.

          Al


          --- In atm_free@yahoogroups.com, Mike Sloane <mikesloane@...> wrote:
          >
          > Thanks for having me. I was recently given a reflector telescope and
          > need some help setting it up. It is a "FieldVision" model 114 1000, and
          > it appears to be complete. It came with several eyepiece lenses, an
          > "extender tube" for the eyepieces, and a Barlow lens, but no
          > instructions. I replaced two broken control knobs/shafts and got it
          > working mechanically, but I have no idea how to set up all the controls
          > or how to even begin. I pointed it at the woods about 100 yards away and
          > expected to see an inverted image, but all I see is white. I understand
          > from my various "google" searches that the instructions for the unit
          > came on a CD, but I have had no luck trying to chase it down. I realize
          > that this might not be an especially good unit, but the price was right,
          > and I would like to "get my toe in the water" before spending real money
          > and time on a better unit.
          >
          > If anyone can give me some direction, I won't bother you any more with
          > this kind of question. I just didn't know where else to turn.
          >
          > Rather than clutter up the photo album, I put an image of the telescope
          > on my own album site:
          > <http://public.fotki.com/mikesloane/tools__equipment/fieldvision-reflect.html>
          >
          > Thanks for your help,
          >
          > Mike
          >
        • Mike Sloane
          Thanks, Al. several people have responded, and group member Dale Eason has been helping me off-line. It appears that my main problem was that I was trying to
          Message 4 of 7 , Nov 1, 2009
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            Thanks, Al. several people have responded, and group member Dale Eason
            has been helping me off-line. It appears that my main problem was that I
            was trying to use the 4mm eyepiece that was in the unit when I got it. I
            followed Dale's suggestion and replaced it with the 20mm eyepiece, and I
            think I am getting on the right track.

            As much as I can tell, the telescope is indeed complete - when I look at
            the "big" end, I can see an inverted tiny image of what the eyepiece is
            pointed at. Two other things I didn't realize are that 1. I should be
            looking at things farther away than 100 yards and 2. I need to move the
            focusing rack much more slowly - this isn't like a 35mm camera focus knob.

            I dearly hope that the unit is collimated properly, because I suspect it
            is very easy for an inexperienced person to get things really screwed up
            in a hurry. But I will keep the references for future use, if necessary.
            When I look into the telescope without the eyepiece in place what I see
            is my own eye looking back, so I am hopeful that is a Good Thing (based
            on your description).

            My next steps are to do some "googling" and acquire some sky watching
            books (I can see how one could end up spending some money on this
            hobby). I don't have the patience or skills that you guys have to make
            your own equipment, so I will just sit back and try to absorb some of
            your knowledge.

            Thanks for putting up with an old new guy.

            Mike

            trulyyours05 wrote:
            >
            >
            > Hi Mike,
            > No need to apologize for asking a question. I've been doing astronomy
            > for years and the members of this group still have to endure my questions.
            >
            > Your description is a little strange when you say you see "white". With
            > the telescope pointed at the woods you should see a blur, but not white.
            > You say there were some broken parts. Are you sure the telescope is
            > complete?
            >
            > The telescope will not focus closer than several hundred yards, so look
            > at a distant target. Even if it is not collimated you should see
            > something. Try to adjust the aim of your finder scope to match what you
            > see in the telescope. Next, try to collimate it. Look at these web pages
            > to get an idea:
            > <http://telescopes.skymania.com/2007/09/how-to-collimate-telescope.html
            > <http://telescopes.skymania.com/2007/09/how-to-collimate-telescope.html>>,
            > <http://telescopes.skymania.com/2007/09/how-to-collimate-telescope.html
            > <http://telescopes.skymania.com/2007/09/how-to-collimate-telescope.html>>.
            >
            > With your telescope a rough collimation will work well. I have one that
            > is similar and used to collimate it without any tools and could get good
            > airy disk results. You don't need to center spot the main mirror, just
            > be sure the image of the main mirror is very well centered in the
            > secondary mirror. It helps to align your eye for this if you insert
            > something into the focuser like a plastic film can that has a small
            > circular hole cut out of its bottom. Then, adjust the tilt of the main
            > mirror so that the image of the secondary and the spider is well
            > centered and you are looking straight back at the center of your own
            > eye's pupil. Play around with it and you should have success. Good luck.
            >
            > Al
          • atmpob
            Don t be afraid of the collimation process. This is a common user adjustment that usually must be done that kind of scope. It is just as easy to get it right
            Message 5 of 7 , Nov 1, 2009
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              Don't be afraid of the collimation process. This is a common user adjustment that usually must be done that kind of scope.

              It is just as easy to get it right as screw it up. You will eventually learn how to do it.

              Dale Eason

              --- In atm_free@yahoogroups.com, Mike Sloane <mikesloane@...> wrote:
              >
              >>
              > I dearly hope that the unit is collimated properly, because I suspect it
              > is very easy for an inexperienced person to get things really screwed up
              > in a hurry. But I will keep the references for future use, if necessary.
            • James Takac
              Hi Dale I agree with you. My very first attempt at collimation was a total screwup but it wasn t hard to get right afterwards. I had noone to show me firsthand
              Message 6 of 7 , Nov 1, 2009
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                Hi Dale

                I agree with you. My very first attempt at collimation was a total screwup but
                it wasn't hard to get right afterwards. I had noone to show me firsthand and
                was going in and out of the house from puter to scope trying. So I'd say to
                em don't be afraid to screw up. It aint that hard to recover from. In fact
                it's a good learning experience imho

                James

                On Monday 02 November 2009 09:36:00 atmpob wrote:
                > Don't be afraid of the collimation process. This is a common user
                > adjustment that usually must be done that kind of scope.
                >
                > It is just as easy to get it right as screw it up. You will eventually
                > learn how to do it.
                >
                > Dale Eason
                >
                > --- In atm_free@yahoogroups.com, Mike Sloane <mikesloane@...> wrote:
                > > I dearly hope that the unit is collimated properly, because I suspect it
                > > is very easy for an inexperienced person to get things really screwed up
                > > in a hurry. But I will keep the references for future use, if necessary.
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