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Re: [atlas_craftsman] Lubrication

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  • J Tiers
    ... like ... I added lube points to my carriage for the ways (not an A-C) and have been MUCH happier. Pumps OUT a lot of crud that must have been hanging in
    Message 1 of 22 , Apr 1 8:56 PM
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      >I am considering adding lubrication to my lathe and mill/drill. I would
      like
      >to hear some pros and cons.



      I added lube points to my carriage for the ways (not an A-C) and have been
      MUCH happier. Pumps OUT a lot of crud that must have been hanging in there.
      And, the difference in ease of movement is 3 to 1 over previous way where
      oil had to get under past the wipers.

      I wanted to do a 1 shot type, but also wanted to get done, so I ended up
      with two 1/4 inch Gits fliptops , one for each of the ways. A wisp of
      pulled felt in each as a filter, and off we went.

      Jerry
    • rocketpsi
      Hi, How religously does the lubrication schedual need to be adhered to? Typically, I m using my late model 12 w/timkens for quick fix up jobs or projects
      Message 2 of 22 , Aug 15, 2003
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        Hi,

        How religously does the lubrication schedual need to be adhered to?
        Typically, I'm using my late model 12" w/timkens for quick fix up
        jobs or projects around the house maybe two or three times a week.
        The average run time <1/2 hour, sometimes 5 minutes.Every couple of
        weeks or so I do a thorough cleaning and complete daily / weekly /
        monthly lubrication.I always visually inspect headstock and drive
        gears for oil/grease films. Would it be advised to go through the
        daily lube regimen for 5-10 minute light duty job?


        R. Helm
      • Jon Elson
        ... I ALWAYS lube those parts of the machine that I will use, EVERY time I use it. I think the Timken bearings hold oil in them for quite a while, but I don t
        Message 3 of 22 , Aug 15, 2003
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          rocketpsi wrote:

          >Hi,
          >
          >How religously does the lubrication schedual need to be adhered to?
          >Typically, I'm using my late model 12" w/timkens for quick fix up
          >jobs or projects around the house maybe two or three times a week.
          >The average run time <1/2 hour, sometimes 5 minutes.Every couple of
          >weeks or so I do a thorough cleaning and complete daily / weekly /
          >monthly lubrication.I always visually inspect headstock and drive
          >gears for oil/grease films. Would it be advised to go through the
          >daily lube regimen for 5-10 minute light duty job?
          >
          >
          I ALWAYS lube those parts of the machine that I will use, EVERY time
          I use it. I think the Timken bearings hold oil in them for quite a while,
          but I don't know for sure. I assume everything else loses most of its oil
          film over 24 hours or so. I especially clean and lube the bed and
          crossslide
          every time I use it. I admit I don't lube every oil hole in the apron
          unless
          I'm doing a long job. I don't do anything on the main leadscrew unless I
          will use it, and I don't always oil the cross slide and compound screws
          and nuts.
          There are even some "secret" lube points, like the Craftsman 12" back gear
          shaft, that you have to pull out a round cover to get at, or the
          countershaft
          that has an oil cup in the middle, between the two pulleys. There's also
          an oil hole for the 4-step pulley in the bottom of one of the pulley holes.
          That is needed only when using the back gear.

          But, I really try to lube it properly, as I'm sure that not taking the time
          to properly lube a machine is one of the surest ways to wreck it, although
          a bit slowly. Remember that NOTHING on these lathes is hardened.

          Jon
        • Ronald Thibault
          ... I always add oil to the bearings, wipe down the ways and relube them before each use, regardless of how long I plan to use it. Ron Thibault Warrenville, SC
          Message 4 of 22 , Aug 17, 2003
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            At 09:45 PM 8/15/2003 +0000, you wrote:
            >Hi,
            >
            >How religously does the lubrication schedual need to be adhered to?
            >Typically, I'm using my late model 12" w/timkens for quick fix up
            >jobs or projects around the house maybe two or three times a week.
            >The average run time <1/2 hour, sometimes 5 minutes.Every couple of
            >weeks or so I do a thorough cleaning and complete daily / weekly /
            >monthly lubrication.I always visually inspect headstock and drive
            >gears for oil/grease films. Would it be advised to go through the
            >daily lube regimen for 5-10 minute light duty job?
            >
            >
            >R. Helm


            I always add oil to the bearings, wipe down the ways and relube
            them before each use, regardless of how long I plan to use it.


            Ron Thibault
            Warrenville, SC USA
            http://personal.atl.bellsouth.net/t/h/thib9564/
          • Ron
            I just purchased a used(duh) 3986 Atlas lathe. I don t have the manual yet but am wondering what kind of lubricant is used in all of the oil cups on the
            Message 5 of 22 , May 12, 2004
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              I just purchased a used(duh) 3986 Atlas lathe. I don't have the
              manual yet but am wondering what kind of lubricant is used in all of
              the oil cups on the lathe-Thanx-Rolf
            • carbure2003
              The lube chart I have stipulates SAE 20 oil in all oil cuups. For gearing, it lists Keystone 1222 gear lubricant. (never found any equivalent) Guy Cadrin ...
              Message 6 of 22 , May 12, 2004
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                The lube chart I have stipulates SAE 20 oil in all oil cuups.

                For gearing, it lists Keystone 1222 gear lubricant. (never found any
                equivalent)





                Guy Cadrin

                --- In atlas_craftsman@yahoogroups.com, "Ron" <luvatenor@h...> wrote:
                > I just purchased a used(duh) 3986 Atlas lathe. I don't have the
                > manual yet but am wondering what kind of lubricant is used in all
                of
                > the oil cups on the lathe-Thanx-Rolf
              • noxonje
                I have abudy who works for Napa Auto Parts. We did find an equiviliant for the Keystone Gear Lube. Napa makes and sells an aerosol called open gear lubricant
                Message 7 of 22 , May 12, 2004
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                  I have abudy who works for Napa Auto Parts. We did find an
                  equiviliant for the Keystone Gear Lube. Napa makes and sells an
                  aerosol called "open gear lubricant" it is about $3.95 per can. I
                  have been using it for about 6 years now with no problems

                  j

                  --- In atlas_craftsman@yahoogroups.com, "carbure2003" <guycad@n...>
                  wrote:
                  > The lube chart I have stipulates SAE 20 oil in all oil cuups.
                  >
                  > For gearing, it lists Keystone 1222 gear lubricant. (never found
                  any
                  > equivalent)
                  >
                  >
                  >
                  >
                  >
                  > Guy Cadrin
                  >
                  > --- In atlas_craftsman@yahoogroups.com, "Ron" <luvatenor@h...>
                  wrote:
                  > > I just purchased a used(duh) 3986 Atlas lathe. I don't have the
                  > > manual yet but am wondering what kind of lubricant is used in
                  all
                  > of
                  > > the oil cups on the lathe-Thanx-Rolf
                • jjjorg1
                  Keystone replaced 122 gear lubricant with Moly 29 Open Gear compound. For the bearings, you could use KLC antiwear 68 or similar hydraulic type SAE 20 weight
                  Message 8 of 22 , May 12, 2004
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                    Keystone replaced 122 gear lubricant with Moly 29 Open Gear compound.
                    For the bearings, you could use KLC antiwear 68 or similar hydraulic
                    type SAE 20 weight oil. Keystone website is
                    www.keystonelubricants.com. Also, Atlas lubrication info is
                    available at www.atlas-press.com/servicebulletins.htm. Joel.


                    --- In atlas_craftsman@yahoogroups.com, "carbure2003" <guycad@n...>
                    wrote:
                    > The lube chart I have stipulates SAE 20 oil in all oil cuups.
                    >
                    > For gearing, it lists Keystone 1222 gear lubricant. (never found
                    any
                    > equivalent)
                    >
                    >
                    >
                    >
                    >
                    > Guy Cadrin
                    >
                    > --- In atlas_craftsman@yahoogroups.com, "Ron" <luvatenor@h...>
                    wrote:
                    > > I just purchased a used(duh) 3986 Atlas lathe. I don't have the
                    > > manual yet but am wondering what kind of lubricant is used in
                    all
                    > of
                    > > the oil cups on the lathe-Thanx-Rolf
                  • Carl Raish
                    A while back there was a discussion about gear lubrication. While I was at an old time machine shop I ask the machinist about lubricating open gears on a
                    Message 9 of 22 , Aug 24, 2004
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                      A while back there was a discussion about gear lubrication. While I
                      was at an old time machine shop I ask the machinist about
                      lubricating open gears on a lathe. He told me he used Gear Shield
                      Extra Heavy Spray by Lubriplate, black and silver spray can. I
                      bought some and tried it, easy to put on and it stays on the gears.
                      Check it out it should work great.

                      Carl Denver
                    • Robert Berry
                      Can someone tell me what to use to oil the small spring loaded ball ports on a 101.07403? As in, is there a standard nozzle that fits the small opening? I
                      Message 10 of 22 , Mar 15, 2008
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                        Can someone tell me what to use to oil the "small spring loaded ball
                        ports" on a 101.07403? As in, is there a standard nozzle that fits
                        the small opening? I hope this makes sense.
                      • ajxnagy
                        Back when I was in lubricant development the main desire for way oil was the prevention of stick - slip so that the carriage would move smoothly - this is
                        Message 11 of 22 , Oct 17, 2008
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                          Back when I was in lubricant development the main desire for way oil was the prevention of "stick - slip" so that the carriage would move smoothly - this is high load, slow motion. This is a different lubrication regime than you find in relatively highspeed bearings. Again a good rust and oxidation inhibited oil with antiwear properties is all you need for bearings found on our small machines. A jet turbine oil would also be an excellent choice. My candidates are automobile power steering fluid and automatic automatic transmission fluid. For the gears and lead screw threads I use a very light film of 90 weight gear oil. Gear oil really has a lot of antiwear additive in it. You don't need much. If the power steering fluid can take care of the highspeed highpressure hydraulic system it can take care if the lathe's rotational components.

                          Crankcase oils have detergents and acid neutralizing components that are needed because of contamination by combustion products. You don't need this on the lathe - I don't think it hurts except for the odor. All lubricants are simply base oils that provide a carrier for the additives that do most of the work. Synthetic or petroleum based really makes very little or no difference. However perception is reality so if you think it works for you have at it. If you don't have metal to metal contact, relatively low temperatures, no standing water and no grit between the rubbing surfaces you should be able to run your small machines without problems.




                          ----- Original Message -----
                          From: rfmarchi@...
                          To: atlas_craftsman@yahoogroups.com
                          Sent: Friday, October 17, 2008 12:04 PM
                          Subject: Re: [atlas_craftsman] New Half nuts hard to engage and other info.



                          I agree that 10 or 20 W oil is a good choice, although I do like the "stickiness"

                          of way oil for the parts of the ways that are in heavy use and frequently wiped.

                          -----Original Message-----
                          From: bill phelps <sweetwaterent2000@...>
                          To: atlas_craftsman@yahoogroups.com
                          Sent: Fri, 17 Oct 2008 10:25 am
                          Subject: Re: [atlas_craftsman] New Half nuts hard to engage and other info.

                          i cant figure out why any one would use way oil on these small lathes? atlas does not list it in there lube chart 10 w or 20 w oil is more than suficiant

                          --- On Fri, 10/17/08, Thomas <jaguar3145@...> wrote:

                          From: Thomas <jaguar3145@...>

                          Subject: [atlas_craftsman] New Half nuts hard to engage and other info.

                          To: atlas_craftsman@yahoogroups.com

                          Date: Friday, October 17, 2008, 2:27 AM

                          Hi Group; Installed the spare apron I bought on eBay after a new

                          bushing for the carriage handwheel, some JB weld on the gear case (are

                          all of these cracked ?), new longer studs for the scroll and brand new

                          half nuts (gift from a pal that got some in a box of parts with an old

                          10"). All that work seemed to be wasted when the feed screw jammed

                          tight and the clutch slipped! I like that clutch!!!! So I went through

                          the old posts and found two goodies of information. John Mecham, who

                          bought his lathe new, I think, said it may be normal. Made me feel

                          better! The other tidbit is a reference about instructions to file the

                          half nuts at 45 degrees to facilitate engagement. Could someone clarify

                          where to file ? Also I noticed that the pipe cleaner wires were NOT

                          moving the oil to the places necessary. I have been using way oil on

                          all the lube points on my lathe. So, since I had both aprons on tne

                          bench I filled the "cup" with Way oil on one apron and Chevron Handy

                          oil on the other. The Way oil didnn't move alog the wire but the Handy

                          oil did; so I won't be using Way oil there! Please don't tell me about

                          10 weight engine oil: it stinks and the whole shop up! Thomas

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                        • pflatlyne
                          It sounds like there is no real One Final Answer to this question. Ive been using type F automatic transmission fluid. No problems so far. However,now I
                          Message 12 of 22 , Oct 17, 2008
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                            It sounds like there is no real "One Final Answer" to this question.
                            Ive been using type F automatic transmission fluid. No problems so
                            far. However,now I blame you if it explodes. ;-)


                            --- In atlas_craftsman@yahoogroups.com, "ajxnagy" <ajxnagy@...> wrote:
                            >
                            > Back when I was in lubricant development the main desire for way oil
                            was the prevention of "stick - slip" so that the carriage would move
                            smoothly - this is high load, slow motion. This is a different
                            lubrication regime than you find in relatively highspeed bearings.
                          • Elton E. (Tony) Clark
                            On Fri, Oct 17, 2008 at 3:08 PM, pflatlyne wrote: It sounds like there is no real One Final Answer to this question. Ive been using
                            Message 13 of 22 , Oct 17, 2008
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                              On Fri, Oct 17, 2008 at 3:08 PM, pflatlyne <pflatlyne@...> wrote:

                              It sounds like there is no real "One Final Answer" to this question.
                              Ive been using type F automatic transmission fluid. No problems so
                              far. However,now I blame you if it explodes. ;-)

                              *I have apparently made the same decision: I keep a couple of oil cans full
                              of ATF on the lathe and I use it for most everything; the extreme pressure
                              additive makes it an excellent cutting oil as well.*
                              **
                              *The clencher was the subjective test in "Home Machinist Magazine" which
                              resulted in a mix of AFT and acetone testing as better than ANY commercial
                              penetrating fluid including KROIL!*
                              **
                              *It';s working for me . *
                              **
                              *Tony*
                              **


                              [Non-text portions of this message have been removed]
                            • ajxnagy
                              Just don t let it get above about 600 degrees F and it shouldn t autoignite. 8 ) (I wear glasses) I hope someone is not using a Dexron formula ATF or there
                              Message 14 of 22 , Oct 17, 2008
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                                Just don't let it get above about 600 degrees F and it shouldn't autoignite. 8>) (I wear glasses)

                                I hope someone is not using a Dexron formula ATF or there might be some controversy and prolonged discussion about your choice of type F. We might even be able to prompt a discussion regarding the impact of the lubricant's color on its performance. It is a marketing fact that the general population doesn't trust a water white lubricant.

                                Either you learn by personal experience or you learn by someone elses and as a consequence there is no One Final Answer. As for me I have tools and eqjuipment decades years old that continue to perform just as long as they are kept from their enemies of dirt and lack of lubrication. They are still like new.

                                Case closed.

                                ----- Original Message -----
                                From: pflatlyne
                                To: atlas_craftsman@yahoogroups.com
                                Sent: Friday, October 17, 2008 3:08 PM
                                Subject: [atlas_craftsman] Re: Lubrication


                                It sounds like there is no real "One Final Answer" to this question.
                                Ive been using type F automatic transmission fluid. No problems so
                                far. However,now I blame you if it explodes. ;-)

                                --- In atlas_craftsman@yahoogroups.com, "ajxnagy" <ajxnagy@...> wrote:
                                >
                                > Back when I was in lubricant development the main desire for way oil
                                was the prevention of "stick - slip" so that the carriage would move
                                smoothly - this is high load, slow motion. This is a different
                                lubrication regime than you find in relatively highspeed bearings.





                                [Non-text portions of this message have been removed]
                              • jerdal@sbcglobal.net
                                ... From: ajxnagy To: Sent: Friday, October 17, 2008 2:24 PM Subject: [atlas_craftsman] Lubrication
                                Message 15 of 22 , Oct 17, 2008
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                                  ----- Original Message -----
                                  From: "ajxnagy" <ajxnagy@...>
                                  To: <atlas_craftsman@yahoogroups.com>
                                  Sent: Friday, October 17, 2008 2:24 PM
                                  Subject: [atlas_craftsman] Lubrication


                                  > Back when I was in lubricant development the main desire for way oil was
                                  > the prevention of "stick - slip" so that the carriage would move
                                  > smoothly - this is high load, slow motion. This is a different lubrication
                                  > regime than you find in relatively highspeed bearings.

                                  Shortly the posts with concoctions of Rislone and marvel etc will surface,
                                  no doubt.....

                                  if 20 wt is good enough for you, don't try anything new, it might shock
                                  you......

                                  But the above post is absolutely right on. I have a 10" Logan as well as
                                  some atlas machines, and way oil goes on the ways of the lathe. MUCH better
                                  than straight oil as far as stick-slip.That enhances the ability to get
                                  precise movement of the carriage........ quite a bit.

                                  JT
                                • Warren D.
                                  I ve been reading about the discussion of oiling a lathe. I haven t been using way oil. How important it that? Enco has it for about $15 a gal plus
                                  Message 16 of 22 , Jan 2, 2011
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                                    I've been reading about the discussion of oiling a lathe. I haven't been using way oil. How important it that? Enco has it for about $15 a gal plus shipping. Scott mentioned the bar oil for the open gears. I think that's perfect. It has a stringy feature for chains so that the oil will stick and not fling off. As for the rest I'v been using regular 20w oil. I probably need to change the way wipes but will have to buy several to get 4 and haven't found a cheap source. I put white grease on the gears once. BIIIIGGGG mistake. But I gotta learn.
                                    Thanks
                                    Warren
                                  • ranchero60
                                    All of our spindles on our Hardinge toolroom lathes use a Mobil #1 spindle oil it is about the same as the small cans of sewing machine oil I buy at the fabric
                                    Message 17 of 22 , Jan 2, 2011
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                                      All of our spindles on our Hardinge toolroom lathes use a Mobil #1
                                      spindle oil it is about the same as the small cans of sewing machine oil
                                      I buy at the fabric store.The small cans go a long way.

                                      On 1/2/2011 6:08 PM, Warren D. wrote:
                                      >
                                      > I've been reading about the discussion of oiling a lathe. I haven't
                                      > been using way oil. How important it that? Enco has it for about $15 a
                                      > gal plus shipping. Scott mentioned the bar oil for the open gears. I
                                      > think that's perfect. It has a stringy feature for chains so that the
                                      > oil will stick and not fling off. As for the rest I'v been using
                                      > regular 20w oil. I probably need to change the way wipes but will have
                                      > to buy several to get 4 and haven't found a cheap source. I put white
                                      > grease on the gears once. BIIIIGGGG mistake. But I gotta learn.
                                      > Thanks
                                      > Warren
                                      >
                                      >


                                      [Non-text portions of this message have been removed]
                                    • Elton E. (Tony) Clark
                                      ... *there are no facts anymore:* ** *Example: I just read an article in Race Engine Technology magazine on the oils that Joe Gibbs uses in his Nascar race
                                      Message 18 of 22 , Jan 2, 2011
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                                        >
                                        > *Things are moving so rapidly in lubrication I'm thinking*
                                        >
                                        *there are no facts anymore:*
                                        **
                                        *Example: I just read an article in "Race Engine Technology" magazine on
                                        the oils that Joe Gibbs uses in his Nascar race engines. These are 800 HP
                                        358 cubic inch V8s running up to 10,000 RPM for two or more hours.*
                                        **
                                        *Oil? Open Cup races SAE 5W20 XP1*
                                        * Restrictor races SAE 0W20 XP2*
                                        * Nationwide SAE 0W20 XP2*
                                        * Qualifying SAE 0W XP0*
                                        **
                                        *There are various lubricating coatings used in race engines that may do
                                        "miracles". We may see the day when something that looks like sewing
                                        machine oil serves everything from wheel bearings up.** . sigh.*
                                        **
                                        **


                                        [Non-text portions of this message have been removed]
                                      • c_h_a_r_t_n_y
                                        Re to Tony Talking lube is like talking politics. OPINION and MYTH. Back in the day when I was in maintenance, we had a lube supplier with an engineer who
                                        Message 19 of 22 , Jan 3, 2011
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                                          Re to Tony
                                          Talking lube is like talking politics. OPINION and MYTH.

                                          Back in the day when I was in maintenance, we had a lube supplier with an engineer who worked with us and reviewed any possible lube related failures. I remember well. He said 2% of failures due to what you use. Rest due to not having lube in right place, right time, clean and other.

                                          For anyone discussing what to use:
                                          How long since you checked every oil point.
                                          How about your tumbler gears taken off and cleaned, oiled.
                                          How long since cross slide off.
                                          How long since carriage off.
                                          How long since compound off.
                                          How long since spindle out.

                                          And each cleaned.

                                          I had my tumbler gears off as they seemed tight. Cleaned and oiled and still the compound gear was tight when the cap screw was tightened. No reason, just always been that way. I turned a tick off the smaller gear face and now have a tiny bit of endplay and all is well.

                                          Oh well, that is just my and my experience.

                                          -chart-
                                          -------------------

                                          --- In atlas_craftsman@yahoogroups.com, "Elton E. (Tony) Clark" <eltonclark@...> wrote:
                                          >
                                          > >
                                          > > *Things are moving so rapidly in lubrication I'm thinking*
                                          > >
                                          > *there are no facts anymore:*
                                          > **
                                          > *Example: I just read an article in "Race Engine Technology" magazine on
                                          > the oils that Joe Gibbs uses in his Nascar race engines. These are 800 HP
                                          > 358 cubic inch V8s running up to 10,000 RPM for two or more hours.*
                                          > **
                                          > *Oil? Open Cup races SAE 5W20 XP1*
                                          > * Restrictor races SAE 0W20 XP2*
                                          > * Nationwide SAE 0W20 XP2*
                                          > * Qualifying SAE 0W XP0*
                                          > **
                                          > *There are various lubricating coatings used in race engines that may do
                                          > "miracles". We may see the day when something that looks like sewing
                                          > machine oil serves everything from wheel bearings up.** . sigh.*
                                          > **
                                          > **
                                          >
                                          >
                                          > [Non-text portions of this message have been removed]
                                          >
                                        • trois2005
                                          If you can find chlorinated parifin you can put it on a steel rod and and run it in a hole in another piece of steel and it wont hurt either one its a super
                                          Message 20 of 22 , Jan 3, 2011
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                                            If you can find chlorinated parifin you can put it on a steel rod and and run it in a hole in another piece of steel and it wont hurt either one its a super lube. Only problem is that you can only find it in 50 gallon drums.

                                            --- In atlas_craftsman@yahoogroups.com, "Elton E. (Tony) Clark" <eltonclark@...> wrote:
                                            >
                                            > >
                                            > > *Things are moving so rapidly in lubrication I'm thinking*
                                            > >
                                            > *there are no facts anymore:*
                                            > **
                                            > *Example: I just read an article in "Race Engine Technology" magazine on
                                            > the oils that Joe Gibbs uses in his Nascar race engines. These are 800 HP
                                            > 358 cubic inch V8s running up to 10,000 RPM for two or more hours.*
                                            > **
                                            > *Oil? Open Cup races SAE 5W20 XP1*
                                            > * Restrictor races SAE 0W20 XP2*
                                            > * Nationwide SAE 0W20 XP2*
                                            > * Qualifying SAE 0W XP0*
                                            > **
                                            > *There are various lubricating coatings used in race engines that may do
                                            > "miracles". We may see the day when something that looks like sewing
                                            > machine oil serves everything from wheel bearings up.** . sigh.*
                                            > **
                                            > **
                                            >
                                            >
                                            > [Non-text portions of this message have been removed]
                                            >
                                          • Warren D.
                                            Do you have a picture?
                                            Message 21 of 22 , Jan 4, 2011
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                                              Do you have a picture?

                                              --- In atlas_craftsman@yahoogroups.com, "J Tiers" <jerdal@...> wrote:
                                              >
                                              >
                                              >
                                              > >I am considering adding lubrication to my lathe and mill/drill. I would
                                              > like
                                              > >to hear some pros and cons.
                                              >
                                              >
                                              >
                                              > I added lube points to my carriage for the ways (not an A-C) and have been
                                              > MUCH happier. Pumps OUT a lot of crud that must have been hanging in there.
                                              > And, the difference in ease of movement is 3 to 1 over previous way where
                                              > oil had to get under past the wipers.
                                              >
                                              > I wanted to do a 1 shot type, but also wanted to get done, so I ended up
                                              > with two 1/4 inch Gits fliptops , one for each of the ways. A wisp of
                                              > pulled felt in each as a filter, and off we went.
                                              >
                                              > Jerry
                                              >
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