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Re: [atlas_craftsman] Not your average bench lathe...

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  • Jon Elson
    ... If you don t need long parts, there are vertical lathes that have a big turntable that looks like a huge faceplate with T-slots in it. It has a big
    Message 1 of 9 , Jan 31, 2001
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      Bob May wrote:

      > No, no. That's not inches but FEET! Sounds like something for a marine
      > application. The biggest land use lathes that I have known of are for
      > railroad usage when the railroads had to turn wheels up to about 7 feet in
      > diameter although they did other stuff up to about 10' in diameter. The
      > only other thing that I can think of for big lathes is for power plant stuff
      > and some of the turbines need lathes that big.

      If you don't need long parts, there are vertical lathes that have a big
      'turntable' that looks like a huge faceplate with T-slots in it. It has a
      big gantry over it that mounts a tool holder. These things run to 15,
      20 or more feet in diameter. Many of them are owned by the US
      Navy, and kept in warehouses somewhere for occasional use to
      repair battleship components. The Navy leases them out when somebody
      needs one. MSU (Michigan State University) leased two of them
      when building some cyclotrons a few years ago.

      Jon
    • Alan Sadler
      Just in case you find one of these big ones, I have a Starrett inside micrometer that ll measure to 36 (feet). It takes at least 2 people to carry it. Alan
      Message 2 of 9 , Feb 1, 2001
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        Just in case you find one of these big ones, I have a Starrett inside
        micrometer that'll measure to 36' (feet). It takes at least 2 people to
        carry it.

        Alan Sadler
        inDirect Solutions
        1510 West Glenlake Avenue
        Chicago, Illinois
        60660-1826
        Ph: 312-656-5969
        Fax: 773-761-7973
        e-mail: sadler@...
      • Tom Staley
        ... There s a company in Eugene, Oregon that make rock crushers that had a vertical lathe of the proportions described in this thread of messages. Also, a
        Message 3 of 9 , Feb 1, 2001
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          >No, no. That's not inches but FEET! Sounds like something for a marine
          >application. The biggest land use lathes that I have known of are for
          >railroad usage when the railroads had to turn wheels up to about 7 feet in
          >diameter although they did other stuff up to about 10' in diameter. The
          >only other thing that I can think of for big lathes is for power plant stuff
          >and some of the turbines need lathes that big.
          >Bob May
          >My new web space address is http://webu.wigloo.com/bobmay/ or
          >http://nav.to/bobmay
          >and my new email address is bobmay@...
          >Bob May
          >
          >
          >TO UNSUBSCRIBE FROM THE LIST:
          >You do this yourself by sending a message to:
          >atlas_craftsman-unsubscribe@egroups.com

          There's a company in Eugene, Oregon that make rock crushers that had
          a vertical lathe of the proportions described in this thread of
          messages. Also, a company in neighboring Springfield, Oregon that
          repairs the rolls for paper mills has an equally long bed length.
          Interesting stuff!

          Tom Staley
        • ikimjing@yahoo.com
          ... lathe ... 35 ... over slide and 35 feet between centers.It has 2 carriges and is rated at 60 ton.Most of the large pcs. are for hydrolic presses and
          Message 4 of 9 , Feb 1, 2001
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            --- In atlas_craftsman@y..., mark usik <mark.usik@s...> wrote:
            > I thought that I should pass on a request that came in today for a
            lathe
            > ( should be educational for some of our new members)
            >
            > Specs: swing over bed........ 120" dia (minimum)
            > distance between centers.... 420" (minimum) ... that's
            35
            > FEET
            > weight capacity ........ 160,000 lbs
            >
            >
            >
            > Hi all.I run a large lathe at work.It will swing84" over bed,76"
            over slide and 35 feet between centers.It has 2 carriges and is rated
            at 60 ton.Most of the large pcs. are for hydrolic presses and turbine
            and fan shafts.Did a fan shaft that was56,000 lbs.Never got to see
            the fan though.Thought you would be intrested.Take care. Jim
          • Jim Irwin
            During my senior year in college (Texas A&M) I worked for a large aluminum door & window company there (Alenco). Designed extrusion dies and various workplace
            Message 5 of 9 , Feb 1, 2001
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              During my senior year in college (Texas A&M) I worked for a large aluminum door
              & window company there (Alenco). Designed extrusion dies and various workplace
              special tools. The small extrusion press had a 6ft dia ram and operated at 3000+
              psi! Take a 6in. diameter billet of aluminum up to near melting temp and then
              squeeze it at that pressure (432,000 psi!) and it flows like toothpaste!

              Somebody had to bore that cylinder, and turn and finish that ram on some big-ass
              machinery! Later, after I was gone, they got a BIG press. 9ft bore for 9 inch
              billets.

              Manly machinery, to be sure!


              Best regards,

              Jim Irwin
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