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Re: [atlas_craftsman] Re: [atleas_craftsman] Drilling well centered holes

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  • James Irwin
    îTwould depend on whether you╣re using oil hardening, air hardening, or water hardening drill rod. Yes...it matters at the quench, but really doesn╣t so
    Message 1 of 58 , Aug 17, 2013
      Re: [atlas_craftsman] Re: [atleas_craftsman] Drilling well centered holes ‘Twould depend on whether you’re using oil hardening, air hardening, or water hardening drill rod.
      Yes...it matters at the quench, but really doesn’t so much at the drawing step. The final color does matter, so water dunk or spray is good for most.

      Jim Irwin



      On 8/17/13 2:36 PM, "cliveadams23@..." wrote:

      I usually use water.

      Clive


      -----Original Message-----
      From: Carl Hollopeter <chollo@...>
      To: atlas_craftsman <atlas_craftsman@yahoogroups.com>
      Sent: Sat, 17 Aug 2013 20:26
      Subject: Re: [atlas_craftsman] Re: [atleas_craftsman] Drilling well centered holes

       
       
       
         
      Clive,
         Thanks for your reply, one more, what are you using for a quenching medium?
      Carl H

      From: cliveadams23@...
      Sent: Saturday, August 17, 2013 1:37 PM
      To: atlas_craftsman@yahoogroups.com
      Subject: Re: [atlas_craftsman] Re: [atleas_craftsman] Drilling well centered holes
       
        

      I heat the business end to red heat then quench to harden it. Then it's cleaned up to bright metal and tempered to a kind of medium straw colour and quenched again. The colour is hard to describe but it's after the light straw and before the dark straw as they're running down toward the tip!

      Did that answer your question or were you looking for a full blow-by-blow account? Hope I've explained it adequately.

      Clive




      -----Original Message-----
      From: Carl Hollopeter <chollo@...>
      To: atlas_craftsman <atlas_craftsman@yahoogroups.com>
      Sent: Sat, 17 Aug 2013 19:22
      Subject: Re: [atlas_craftsman] Re: [atleas_craftsman] Drilling well centered holes

        
      Clive,
         What is your method of “hardening and tempering” the bits after you grind them?
      Carl H

      From: cliveadams23@...
      Sent: Saturday, August 17, 2013 1:44 AM
      To: atlas_craftsman@yahoogroups.com
      Subject: Re: [atlas_craftsman] Re: [atleas_craftsman] Drilling well centered holes
       
        
      Oh - those bushings . . .

      I had to make a couple 20-odd years ago when I bought the lathe - I used mild steel turned to size on I/D and O/D, then secured a machine vice to the cross-slide and milled the slots with an end-mill held in the chuck. Made keys out of mild steel and brazed them in place. It worked, and they're still in use.

      I know the machining method was questionable but it got the job done with what I had at the time.

      I've had better success keeping a D-bit on course than twist drills (you might call them gun drills over there . . . ?) You make them out of silver steel (drill rod) and file a flat on it, then grind the bit from there and harden and temper it. Chip clearance is nil and you have to keep withdrawing the bit to keep the chips from binding which is a PITA but they (generally) stay on course and drill an accurate hole.

      I'm not a big fan of very slender boring bars because of the spring in them - the further in they get the more spring  you get and I've ended up with funnel-shaped holes in the past . . . And a boring bar that will pass through a 3/8"  hole is slender, even between centres.

      Whatever, good luck!

      Clive


      -----Original Message-----
      From: wa5cab <wa5cab@...>
      To: atlas_craftsman <atlas_craftsman@yahoogroups.com>
      Sent: Sat, 17 Aug 2013 6:36
      Subject: Re: [atlas_craftsman] Re: [atleas_craftsman] Drilling well centered holes

        
      DH,

      OK.  That's what I was afraid you were talking about.  Those are die cast parts.  You basically cannot make those on an engine lathe.  As the surface finish of the OD is not critical (it does not move relative to the bore of the change gears), you could make usable facsimiles if you had free access to an NC work center and were a very savvy programmer.  But the cost of machine time would eat your lunch if you were trying to make a buck on the parts and had to pay for machine time.  Assuming that 1 degree rotation between passes gave an acceptable surface finish, the end mill would need to make 4 passes to cut the two keys plus an estimated 303 (or maybe only 299) passes to cut the reduced diameter surface.  Or, assuming that you used a 1/8" diameter end mill,  you could reduce the number of passes for the majority of the surface to 7 by rotating the part instead of moving it end to end but you would still have to finish the 1/16" wide a rea on both sides of both keys with longitudinal cuts.  Which theoretically I think would take 57 passes at 1 degree per pass.

      In a message dated 08/16/2013 20:06:46 PM Central Daylight Time, thehairs@...
      writes:
      OK Robert, The bushing  photo is in a album labeled " Drilling well centered  holes"

      D.Hair


      Robert Downs - Houston
      wa5cab dot com (Web Store)
      MVPA 9480

       
         
       

         


    • anthrhodes
      D. Hair, You could also ask them if they can do an extrusion the full form of the section of the bushing. It s likely they can but probably not at a price
      Message 58 of 58 , Aug 18, 2013
        D. Hair,
         
        You could also ask them if they can do an extrusion the full form of the section of the bushing. It's likely they can but probably not at a price which is acceptable to you. The question of price for the 5/8" OD x 3/8" ID section, if they don't already have the tooling, may also be a killer.
         
        (You might also consider the same methods for gear bushings for the 9", 10", and 12" lathes. I have no idea what the market is for bushings for any of the Atlas-built and similar lathes.)
         
        Anthony
        Berkeley, Calif.
        ***************************************************
        In a message dated Fri Aug 16, 2013 4:55 pm (PDT), dhlh1984 writes:
        I have a request into that company to see if they make the extrusion in an 1/8 inch larger size. That would be great and I would order 20 or so feet.
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