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Re: Dissimilar metal issues? (Slightly off topic)

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  • Lotus 14
    I don t know what the plug design is like, and what the oil pan is like,on your car, but one thing you could do is make a plug that is similar to the straight
    Message 1 of 15 , Jun 14, 2013
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      I don't know what the plug design is like, and what the oil pan is like,on your car, but one thing you could do is make a plug that is similar to the straight threaded and shouldered plugs as used in some early British cars; particularly those with cast aluminium pans.
      The thread was probably a British "straight pipe" thread, but the plug had a fairly good size shoulder with a hard phenolic or similar gasket.
      It also had a smaller hex than you would normally have with the thread size, which didn't allow the mechanic to crank down as hard on the plug.
      The advantage was the plug came to a stop at the shoulder, and you could only torque it so much. If you made it from brass, you would most likely round off the hex before you destroyed the threads.
      I'm not sure where you could get a good picture of the plug, but it was common enough that someone out there may have a photo you could use as a guide.
      I have an old Lotus with this type of plug. Take a look at this site: http://www.magneticoildrainplugs.co.uk/Dimple_Magnetic_Oil_Drain_Plugs.html#.UbvIyucqbfU
    • wa5cab
      Land Rover used similar sump drain plugs on engines, gearboxes and differentials. Mostly in brass. The sealing washers were soft copper, and not intended to
      Message 2 of 15 , Jun 14, 2013
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        Land Rover used similar sump drain plugs on engines, gearboxes and differentials.  Mostly in brass.  The sealing washers were soft copper, and not intended to be reused.

        In a message dated 06/14/2013 20:53:48 PM Central Daylight Time, lotus_14us@... writes:
        I don't know what the plug design is like, and what the oil pan is like,on your car, but one thing you could do is make a plug that is similar to the straight threaded and shouldered plugs as used in some early British cars; particularly those with cast aluminium pans.
        The thread was probably a British "straight pipe" thread, but the plug had a fairly good size shoulder with a hard phenolic or similar gasket.
        It also had a smaller hex than you would normally have with the thread size, which didn't allow the mechanic to crank down as hard on the plug.
        The advantage was the plug came to a stop at the shoulder, and you could only torque it so much. If you made it from brass, you would most likely round off the hex before you destroyed the threads.
        I'm not sure where you could get a good picture of the plug, but it was common enough that someone out there may have a photo you could use as a guide.
        I have an old Lotus with this type of plug. Take a look at this site:  http://www.magneticoildrainplugs.co.uk/Dimple_Magnetic_Oil_Drain_Plugs.html#.UbvIyucqbfU


        Robert & Susan Downs - Houston
        wa5cab dot com (Web Store)
        MVPA 9480
      • Carl Hollopeter
        Definitely was a different Walmart than cracked the pan on my Grand-daughter’s car. They did pay to have it repaired but refused to pay for a rental vehicle
        Message 3 of 15 , Jun 15, 2013
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          Definitely was a different Walmart than cracked the pan on my Grand-daughter’s car. They did pay to have it repaired but refused to pay for a rental vehicle for the three days it took to order and install the pan.
          Carl H
           
          Sent: Friday, June 14, 2013 2:24 PM
          Subject: [atlas_craftsman] Re: Dissimilar metal issues? (Slightly off topic)
           
           

          When I was doing tire & lube for Walmart a few years back, they refused to work on cars with damaged or non-standard replacement plugs. That included all the fancy "keep 'em from stripping out" types. Torque wrench only, no impact wrenches allowed except on the tire changes...

          Bill in OKC

          --- In mailto:atlas_craftsman%40yahoogroups.com, Curt Wuollet <wideopen1@...> wrote:

          >
          > There are rubber
          expansion plugs that don't use the threads and it would
          > drive their
          techs crazy figuring out how to wreck them.
          >
          > Regards
          >
          > cww
          >
          > On 06/12/2013 04:49 PM, rogers92026 wrote:
          > > I have been contemplating using my Atlas 12x36 lathe to turn and
          single-point thread a special oil plug for a new car. I am interested in considering the issue of dissimilar metals before I go too far. I apologize if this post is off topic. But it does involve the Atlas lathe and dissimilar metals which may be of general interest to a few.
          > >
          > > The
          problem that I'm trying to solve is to keep from stripping the oil pan on a new car. No matter where I go it seems like the oil change tech like to over-tighten the plug. SNIP!

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