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Re: Atlas tailstock mods.

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  • dolphin_79605
    Robert, I was thinking of making something out of what the OEM made for cross/compound feeds, but you have caught my interest. I d buy coffee for the chance to
    Message 1 of 6 , Jun 2, 2013
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      Robert, I was thinking of making something out of what the OEM made for cross/compound feeds, but you have caught my interest.

      I'd buy coffee for the chance to see photos; or perhaps some are already listed in the Photos heading here?

      Thanks, Mick

      --- In atlas_craftsman@yahoogroups.com, wa5cab@... wrote:
      >
      > Mick,
      >
      > OK. A very light spring probably wouldn't hurt anything.
      >
      > The micrometer dial on my 3996 tailstock came from an eBay seller. It is
      > made like a short cylinder with one end closed. The cylindrical part extends
      > toward the headstock and fits around (over) the tailstock ram screw
      > bearing. The flat closed end fits over the screw and against the adjusting nut.
      > Last time that I looked for the seller he still had items listed but none of
      > the dials. I don't know whether he sold out and decided not to restock or
      > what. I didn't write and ask. However, the dial works and looks just fine.
      >
      > Robert D.
      >
      > In a message dated 6/2/2013 11:48:11 AM Central Daylight Time,
      > dolphin_79605@... writes:
      > > I went through my tailstock recently due to binding. I found culprit to
      > > be disorientation of the lock (M6-44) flat to the ram. Evidently it had
      > > rotated a number of times causing minor flats to be worn, none of which
      > > allowed the release tension when called for hand lever loosened.
      > >
      > > I cleaned up the original factory flat on the lock the best I could and
      > > noted not to loosen hand lever more than necessary to move the ram in the
      > > future.
      > >
      > > At the same time I took notice that a (unauthorized) light weight spring
      > > under the lock would keep it from falling when the handle was unlocked. In
      > > my mind the purpose would be the keeping of the lock flat oriented to the
      > > ram with minimal pressure.
      > >
      > > I was not thinking any spring tension near heavy enough to cause enough
      > > drag to wear a flat, but enough to automatically keep the lock flat in proper
      > > alignment when moving ram back and fourth via handwheel operation.
      > >
      > > This is about the same time I got to thinking a nice dial between the
      > > handwheel and tailstock could be a very useful tool for certain operations too.
      > >
      > > Happy Sunday, Mick
      > >
      >
    • Sam Rod
      Mick, I will add If you look at one of the photos I uploaded the old lock assembly. Back when I first visited my lock I myself added a small spring in
      Message 2 of 6 , Jun 2, 2013
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        Mick,
        I will add If you look at one of the photos I uploaded  the  old lock assembly.
        Back when I first visited my lock I myself added a small spring in between the cylindrical locks.
        Thinking it would act kind of like the TS lower lock spring. keeping the ability to lock/unlock down to a minimal turn.
        In my first attempt I underestimated how sloppy and mal formed my factory Ram lock was and the spring did nothing in fact I think it hurt my 
        particular scenario. While I was really reefing on the lock what also was happening was the spring was coil binding. so keep this in mind.
        Im actually considering making a second set with a small relief cut in to factor in a spring. Only if I conclude that while my new setup works extremely well
        compared to my earlier setup. Im hoping I can maintain a 1/4 turn absolute lock down. if it goes well beyond that any time soon. Ill incorporate the spring.

        Perhaps another way to look at ones setup. is if a spring helps your setup... its  a good chance you have a sloppy setup. and we all know how that story ends...

        Sam





        On Jun 2, 2013, at 1:14 PM, wa5cab@... wrote:



        Mick,

        OK.  A very light spring probably wouldn't hurt anything.

        The micrometer dial on my 3996 tailstock came from an eBay seller.  It is made like a short cylinder with one end closed.  The cylindrical part extends toward the headstock and fits around (over) the tailstock ram screw bearing.  The flat closed end fits over the screw and against the adjusting nut.  Last time that I looked for the seller he still had items listed but none of the dials.  I don't know whether he sold out and decided not to restock or what.  I didn't write and ask.  However, the dial works and looks just fine.

        Robert D.

        In a message dated 6/2/2013 11:48:11 AM Central Daylight Time, dolphin_79605@... writes: 
        I went through my tailstock recently due to binding.   I found culprit to be disorientation of the lock (M6-44) flat to the ram.  Evidently it had rotated a number of times causing minor flats to be worn, none of which allowed the release tension when called for hand lever loosened.  

        I cleaned up the original factory flat on the lock the best I could and noted not to loosen hand lever more than necessary to move the ram in the future.  

        At the same time I took notice that a (unauthorized) light weight spring under the lock would keep it from falling when the handle was unlocked.  In my mind the purpose would be the keeping of the lock flat oriented to the ram with minimal pressure.  

        I was not thinking any spring tension near heavy enough to cause enough drag to wear a flat, but enough to automatically keep the lock flat in proper alignment when moving ram back and fourth via handwheel operation.

        This is about the same time I got to thinking a nice dial between the handwheel and tailstock could be a very useful tool for certain operations too.

        Happy Sunday,  Mick





      • wa5cab
        Mick, We are up against an 08:00 Monday deadline to move out of my father-in-law s (deceased) apartment. And it will be much easier to dig up the info when I
        Message 3 of 6 , Jun 2, 2013
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          Mick,

          We are up against an 08:00 Monday deadline to move out of my father-in-law's (deceased) apartment.  And it will be much easier to dig up the info when I am back in Houston with the big machine instead of on this laptop.  If there are any photos on Yahoo, I don't know about them and didn't put them there.  In about a week I should be caught up enough after returning to Houston to make some of my machine.  It is definitely already too late to find the ones that were originally on eBay as I bought the thing sometime last year.  Drop me a reminder note in a few days.;

          Robert D.

          In a message dated 6/2/2013 12:23:20 PM Central Daylight Time, dolphin_79605@... writes:
          Robert, I was thinking of making something out of what the OEM made for cross/compound feeds, but you have caught my interest. 

          I'd buy coffee for the chance to see photos; or perhaps some are already listed in the Photos heading here? 

          Thanks,  Mick

          --- In atlas_craftsman@yahoogroups.com, wa5cab@... wrote:
          >
          >Mick,
          >
          >OK.  A very light spring probably wouldn't hurt anything.
          >
          >The micrometer dial on my 3996 tailstock came from an eBay seller.  It is
          >made like a short cylinder with one end closed.  The cylindrical part extends
          >toward the headstock and fits around (over) the tailstock ram screw
          >bearing.  The flat closed end fits over the screw and against the adjusting nut. 
          >Last time that I looked for the seller he still had items listed but none of
          >the dials.  I don't know whether he sold out and decided not to restock or
          >what.  I didn't write and ask.  However, the dial works and looks just fine.
          >
          >Robert D.
          >
          >In a message dated 6/2/2013 11:48:11 AM Central Daylight Time,
          >dolphin_79605@... writes:
          >>I went through my tailstock recently due to binding.   I found culprit to
          >>be disorientation of the lock (M6-44) flat to the ram.  Evidently it had
          >>rotated a number of times causing minor flats to be worn, none of which
          >>allowed the release tension when called for hand lever loosened. 
          >>
          >>I cleaned up the original factory flat on the lock the best I could and
          >>noted not to loosen hand lever more than necessary to move the ram in the
          >>future. 
          >>
          >>At the same time I took notice that a (unauthorized) light weight spring
          >>under the lock would keep it from falling when the handle was unlocked.  In
          >>my mind the purpose would be the keeping of the lock flat oriented to the
          >>ram with minimal pressure. 
          >>
          >>I was not thinking any spring tension near heavy enough to cause enough
          >>drag to wear a flat, but enough to automatically keep the lock flat in proper
          >>alignment when moving ram back and fourth via handwheel operation.
          >>
          >>This is about the same time I got to thinking a nice dial between the
          >>handwheel and tailstock could be a very useful tool for certain operations too.
          >>
          >>Happy Sunday,  Mick
          >>
          >


          Robert & Susan Downs - Houston
          wa5cab dot com (Web Store)
          MVPA 9480
        • Doc
          on my later crftsmn 12x36, a mag base indicator grips right on the front side of t/stock casting & a split clamp piece of aluminum clamped on the
          Message 4 of 6 , Jun 2, 2013
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                on my   later  crftsmn 12x36, a  mag base indicator grips right on  the  front  side  of  t/stock  casting  & a split clamp piece of  aluminum clamped on the t/stock barrel is  used  to  bear  against   the  point ...quick &  easy ..i used it quite a  bit  for  accurate  rifle  barrel  chambering  to  under  a  thou ..BUT  that  is  th e only  use  i have  found  for  that  kind  of  accuracy  from  the   t/stock
               i wud think a dial on the  rear to be an  asset &  certainly cant  see a negative .........
             
            and FWIW ,if  anyone  is  doing  chambering  now , put on a mag  base   indicator ( Shars  $18 ) bearing  on  the front of the TAILSTOCK  also , so you can  return it to zero   before  advancing the  reamer ..!!!!!!.,,,,,,.cant believe how  long it took me  to start  doing  THAT  !!!!..

            The micrometer dial on my 3996 tailstock came from an eBay seller.  It is made like a short cylinder with one end closed.  The cylindrical part extends toward the headstock and fits around (over) the tailstock ram screw bearing.  The flat closed end fits over the screw and against the adjusting nut.  Last time that I looked for the seller he still had items listed but none of the dials.  I don't know whether he sold out and decided not to restock or what.  I didn't write and ask.  However, the dial works and looks just
            -----Original Message-----
            From: wa5cab <wa5cab@...>
            To: atlas_craftsman <atlas_craftsman@yahoogroups.com>
            Sent: Sun, Jun 2, 2013 12:14 pm
            Subject: Re: [atlas_craftsman] Re: Atlas tailstock mods.

             
            Mick,

            OK.  A very light spring probably wouldn't hurt anything.

            The micrometer dial on my 3996 tailstock came from an eBay seller.  It is made like a short cylinder with one end closed.  The cylindrical part extends toward the headstock and fits around (over) the tailstock ram screw bearing.  The flat closed end fits over the screw and against the adjusting nut.  Last time that I looked for the seller he still had items listed but none of the dials.  I don't know whether he sold out and decided not to restock or what.  I didn't write and ask.  However, the dial works and looks just fine.

            Robert D.

            In a message dated 6/2/2013 11:48:11 AM Central Daylight Time, dolphin_79605@... writes:
            I went through my tailstock recently due to binding.   I found culprit to be disorientation of the lock (M6-44) flat to the ram.  Evidently it had rotated a number of times causing minor flats to be worn, none of which allowed the release tension when called for hand lever loosened. 

            I cleaned up the original factory flat on the lock the best I could and noted not to loosen hand lever more than necessary to move the ram in the future. 

            At the same time I took notice that a (unauthorized) light weight spring under the lock would keep it from falling when the handle was unlocked.  In my mind the purpose would be the keeping of the lock flat oriented to the ram with minimal pressure. 

            I was not thinking any spring tension near heavy enough to cause enough drag to wear a flat, but enough to automatically keep the lock flat in proper alignment when moving ram back and fourth via handwheel operation.

            This is about the same time I got to thinking a nice dial between the handwheel and tailstock could be a very useful tool for certain operations too.

            Happy Sunday,  Mick


          • dolphin_79605
            Sam, I didn t put a mic to the lock parts and lock bore recess when I had it disassembled. Rightfully I should have as I may be assuming myself down a path I
            Message 5 of 6 , Jun 2, 2013
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              Sam, I didn't put a mic to the lock parts and lock bore recess when I had it disassembled. Rightfully I should have as I may be assuming myself down a path I don't need to be taking.

              It looked like during the lathe's previous life the lock hand lever was released much farther than only what it needed to be to move the ram.

              It looked like the lock then allowed itself to be lowered enough during this period to clear the ram and then rotate slightly. Upon retightened, the lock was drawn up to bind with the ram while the lock flat was rotated out of axial position.

              There were lots of dimples or many mini-flats on the top side circumference of the lock leading me to this theory. I took this as indication the above scenario happened repeatedly; enough times the lock began to swell at the top with all the excess dimpling.

              Binding of the ram during handwheel operation was the initial cause of my investigation. I noticed it the first time I was checking for proper operation and lubricating various systems of the lathe.

              It works well now, but I don't loosen the hand lever any more than 1/4 turn or what is required. Next time I have it down, I will do a more in depth visual with better lighting and a bit of metrological study.

              I am not interested in unnecessary repairs, but am very curious of the original clearance spec between the lock and lock bore. Best regards, Mick


              --- In atlas_craftsman@yahoogroups.com, Sam Rod <mail4sam@...> wrote:
              >
              > Mick,
              > I will add If you look at one of the photos I uploaded the old lock assembly.
              > Back when I first visited my lock I myself added a small spring in between the cylindrical locks.
              > Thinking it would act kind of like the TS lower lock spring. keeping the ability to lock/unlock down to a minimal turn.
              > In my first attempt I underestimated how sloppy and mal formed my factory Ram lock was and the spring did nothing in fact I think it hurt my
              > particular scenario. While I was really reefing on the lock what also was happening was the spring was coil binding. so keep this in mind.
              > Im actually considering making a second set with a small relief cut in to factor in a spring. Only if I conclude that while my new setup works extremely well
              > compared to my earlier setup. Im hoping I can maintain a 1/4 turn absolute lock down. if it goes well beyond that any time soon. Ill incorporate the spring.
              >
              > Perhaps another way to look at ones setup. is if a spring helps your setup... its a good chance you have a sloppy setup. and we all know how that story ends...
              >
              > Sam
              >
              >
              >
              >
              >
              > On Jun 2, 2013, at 1:14 PM, wa5cab@... wrote:
              >
              > >
              > >
              > > Mick,
              > >
              > > OK. A very light spring probably wouldn't hurt anything.
              > >
              > > The micrometer dial on my 3996 tailstock came from an eBay seller. It is made like a short cylinder with one end closed. The cylindrical part extends toward the headstock and fits around (over) the tailstock ram screw bearing. The flat closed end fits over the screw and against the adjusting nut. Last time that I looked for the seller he still had items listed but none of the dials. I don't know whether he sold out and decided not to restock or what. I didn't write and ask. However, the dial works and looks just fine.
              > >
              > > Robert D.
              > >
              > > In a message dated 6/2/2013 11:48:11 AM Central Daylight Time, dolphin_79605@... writes:
              > >> I went through my tailstock recently due to binding. I found culprit to be disorientation of the lock (M6-44) flat to the ram. Evidently it had rotated a number of times causing minor flats to be worn, none of which allowed the release tension when called for hand lever loosened.
              > >>
              > >> I cleaned up the original factory flat on the lock the best I could and noted not to loosen hand lever more than necessary to move the ram in the future.
              > >>
              > >> At the same time I took notice that a (unauthorized) light weight spring under the lock would keep it from falling when the handle was unlocked. In my mind the purpose would be the keeping of the lock flat oriented to the ram with minimal pressure.
              > >>
              > >> I was not thinking any spring tension near heavy enough to cause enough drag to wear a flat, but enough to automatically keep the lock flat in proper alignment when moving ram back and fourth via handwheel operation.
              > >>
              > >> This is about the same time I got to thinking a nice dial between the handwheel and tailstock could be a very useful tool for certain operations too.
              > >>
              > >> Happy Sunday, Mick
              > >
              > >
              > >
              > >
              > >
              >
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