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Re: [atlas_craftsman] Curiosity killed the cat.

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  • wa5cab
    Tom, In the owner s manual, what is the information at top right of page 1 (which is the 5th page (counting front and back as 2) into the manual in three
    Message 1 of 34 , Apr 28, 2013
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      Tom,

      In the owner's manual, what is the information at top right of page 1 (which is the 5th page (counting front and back as 2) into the manual in three different model manuals that I have)?

      FWIW, the one multiple-model manual that I have doesn't show a serial number range start.  And the start serial numbers of the 3965, 3986 and 3996 are different, whereas the print dates are close to the same (1975 or 76).  Which would seem to indicate that Atlas assigned serial number blocks to the various models before they were built.

      Also, does anyone have Atlas single-model manuals for models or dates other than the following?

      3965   December 1975
      3986   October 1975
      3996   December 1974
      3996   December 1975

      None of the Sears manuals that I have copies of show an applicable serial number range.

      Robert D.

      In a message dated 04/28/2013 09:42:48 AM Central Daylight Time, tmgsr@... writes:
      On Sat, 27 Apr 2013 03:00:19 -0000, "dolphin_79605"
      <dolphin_79605@...>:

      >My lathe is a 3996. An on line article indicated they were introduced in 1959.  I haven't found any casting dates on the way foundation yet, but am still looking.

      I too have a 3996, I have the original manual with it, that the owner
      when he bought new, had put his name in the back and the date in the
      back, I can only assume that was the date he bought it new as the son
      in law said he had bought new some 35 years ago

      he dated it  4-12-68 serial number is 101789


      my atlas manual of lathe operations and machinist table still had the
      original box it came with inside under list of reprints
      23rd edition
      reprinted from 38 through misc years till 1967  being the last year
      noted inside my book

      next page or so, it had a list of wall charts you could buy for 1.00
      each, for some reason I think it would had been nice to have those and
      I bet a dollar he had them but they were bought before I got to the
      estate sale, the guy had all kinds of stuff

      Tom
      >
      >The "Operating Instructions and Parts List" that I received with it indicates, on page 1,  "December 1974 File No. 12AC with Serial No. 100200 to ______ (unfilled in)".  My lathe's S/N is 104XXX.  That info is as close as I know so far.  I would be interested in seeing what that info changed to on later publications on the same page.
      >
      >The central question, is there is a date of manufacture chart, link or other form of definitive dating, by M/N, S/N (or other identifiable information)?  I am just curious.
      >
      >Thanks,  Mick


      Robert & Susan Downs - Houston
      wa5cab dot com (Web Store)
      MVPA 9480
    • none
      Hello, If you have access to a milling machine it is possible to carve a new compound-top slide from a block of steel. There was a neet magezine article about
      Message 34 of 34 , Apr 30, 2013
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        Hello,
        If you have access to a milling machine it is possible to carve a new compound-top slide from a block of steel. There was a neet magezine article about doing this work for a smaller Atlas 618 lathe in the July-August 2012 issue of "The Home Shop Machinist" by James Hornicek. He improved the strength of the slide greatly with his better design.

        Gary in AZ

        --- In atlas_craftsman@yahoogroups.com, Jon Elson <elson@...> wrote:
        >
        > Carvel Webb wrote:
        > >
        > >
        > > Another thing I forgot to mention is that when one is parting off it
        > > is a good idea to clamp the carriage and snug up the gib adjustments
        > > on the cross and top slides to minimise any slack in the whole assembly ,
        > >
        > Another thing is to back up the compound slide so that the toolpost is as
        > close to centered over the swivel as possible. The worst is to have the
        > compound extended so that the toolpost is not over the swivel at all,
        > this greatly increases the chances of breaking the top slide as well
        > as making the lack of rigidity problem worse.
        >
        > Jon
        >
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