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Oiling My "New" Timken Headstock

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  • shuckersfan
    So I ve got my newt ome Timken headstock on my lathe and the transformation is amazing. The finish is beeautiful and I can actually take a of cut more than a
    Message 1 of 7 , Apr 4, 2013
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      So I've got my newt ome Timken headstock on my lathe and the transformation is amazing. The finish is beeautiful and I can actually take a of cut more than a few few thou. I put a couple of plugs of 1/4" thick wool felt down the oil cups andI'm wondering if I need more. If I fill the cups to the top, how long should it take for the oil to drain into the bearings? It only takes about 5 minutes or so now so I think I'm a little light on the felt.

      Thanks,

      Todd
    • Eggleston Lance
      I agree. The bearings need only a thin layer of oil, that would be a few drops per minute. Try a denser felt or a hole restrictor plate. lance ++++
      Message 2 of 7 , Apr 4, 2013
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        I agree. 
        The bearings need only a thin layer of oil,
        that would be a few drops per minute.

        Try a denser felt or a hole restrictor plate.

        lance
        ++++

        On Apr 4, 2013, at 12:05 PM, shuckersfan wrote:

        So I've got my newt ome Timken headstock on my lathe and the transformation is amazing. The finish is beeautiful and I can actually take a of cut more than a few few thou. I put a couple of plugs of 1/4" thick wool felt down the oil cups andI'm wondering if I need more. If I fill the cups to the top, how long should it take for the oil to drain into the bearings? It only takes about 5 minutes or so now so I think I'm a little light on the felt. 

        Thanks,

        Todd

      • Glenn N
        That sounds about right to me. The bearing shields retain a bit of oil down in the bearings and as long as you give it a squirt every day you use it the oil
        Message 3 of 7 , Apr 4, 2013
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          That sounds about right to me.  The bearing shields retain a bit of oil down in the bearings and as long as you give it a squirt every day you use it the oil will do it's thing.  The main reason for the felt is to filter the oil. 
           
          Glenn
          ----- Original Message -----
          Sent: Thursday, April 04, 2013 9:30 AM
          Subject: Re: [atlas_craftsman] Oiling My "New" Timken Headstock

          I agree. 
          The bearings need only a thin layer of oil,
          that would be a few drops per minute.

          Try a denser felt or a hole restrictor plate.

          lance
          ++++

          On Apr 4, 2013, at 12:05 PM, shuckersfan wrote:

          So I've got my newt ome Timken headstock on my lathe and the transformation is amazing. The finish is beeautiful and I can actually take a of cut more than a few few thou. I put a couple of plugs of 1/4" thick wool felt down the oil cups andI'm wondering if I need more. If I fill the cups to the top, how long should it take for the oil to drain into the bearings? It only takes about 5 minutes or so now so I think I'm a little light on the felt. 

          Thanks,

          Todd
        • wa5cab
          Overnight more or less. Order new felts from Clausing. While you re at it (unless you already bought them) order new way felts and wipers, too. In a message
          Message 4 of 7 , Apr 4, 2013
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            Overnight more or less.  Order new felts from Clausing.  While you're at it (unless you already bought them) order new way felts and wipers, too.

            In a message dated 4/4/2013 11:05:18 AM Central Daylight Time, shuckersfan@... writes:
            So I've got my newt ome Timken headstock on my lathe and the transformation is amazing.  The finish is beeautiful and I can actually take a of cut more than a few few thou.  I put a couple of plugs of 1/4" thick wool felt down the oil cups andI'm wondering if I need more.  If I fill the cups to the top, how long should it take for the oil to drain into the bearings?  It only takes about 5 minutes or so now so I think I'm a little light on the felt. 

            Thanks,

            Todd


            Robert Downs - Houston
            wa5cab dot com (Web Store)
            MVPA 9480
          • Jon Elson
            ... This is fine! Unlike the Babbit bearings that need a continuous flow of oil, the spacer and rollers of the Timken bearing hold a LOT of oil and whirl it
            Message 5 of 7 , Apr 4, 2013
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              shuckersfan wrote:
              > So I've got my newt ome Timken headstock on my lathe and the transformation is amazing. The finish is beeautiful and I can actually take a of cut more than a few few thou. I put a couple of plugs of 1/4" thick wool felt down the oil cups andI'm wondering if I need more. If I fill the cups to the top, how long should it take for the oil to drain into the bearings? It only takes about 5 minutes or so now so I think I'm a little light on the felt.
              >
              This is fine! Unlike the Babbit bearings that need a continuous flow of
              oil,
              the spacer and rollers of the Timken bearing hold a LOT of oil and whirl
              it around when running. So, a rush of oil when you start for the day is
              fine to flush out any contaminants that may have crept into the bearing,
              and then the rollers will stay wet all day.

              Jon
            • James Irwin
              While the felt might filter the oil somewhat, its main purpose is to very slowly feed oil to the bearings. Flooding them does little good and leaves them dry
              Message 6 of 7 , Apr 4, 2013
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                Re: [atlas_craftsman] Oiling My "New" Timken Headstock While the felt might filter the oil somewhat, its main purpose is to very slowly feed oil to the bearings.
                Flooding them does little good and leaves them dry pretty quickly. No matter how much oil is present, only the tiniest bit of it does the work. Still that tiny bit is critical to bearing life and smooth operation.

                Consider the ball bearings in a 2 cycle engine, lubricated by a mist of 50:1 dilution in gasoline.
                It don’t take much.

                Jim Irwin



                On 4/4/13 11:51 AM, "Glenn N" wrote:

                That sounds about right to me.  The bearing shields retain a bit of oil down in the bearings and as long as you give it a squirt every day you use it the oil will do it's thing.  The main reason for the felt is to filter the oil.  
              • jtiers
                You are both right..... The felt DOES filter the oil. While it obviously does not keep out micron-sized crud, it keeps any of the usual swarf and dust out of
                Message 7 of 7 , Apr 5, 2013
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                  You are both right.....
                   
                  The felt DOES filter the oil.  While it obviously does not keep out micron-sized crud, it keeps any of the usual swarf and dust out of the bearing, which is an essential function.  You need that.
                   
                  And, yes, too much oil is bad, in some cases (but not with the lathe bearings) it can destroy the bearing.   The entire design of the Atlas bearing lube system is unsuited to a steady stream of oil..... but it should let "enough" through, and a squirt every few hours should be able to keep "enough" lube in place.   The bearings only really need enough to keep the cages from wearing down the rollers. That amount is plenty for the rollers against the races, where only a trace is really required.
                   
                  You can refer to bearing books for confirmation, the "New Departure bearing handbook" is pretty good, and was widely distributed... I see copies of the two volume set fairly regularly.
                   
                  JT
                  ----- Original Message -----
                  To: Atlas
                  Sent: Thursday, April 04, 2013 10:35 PM
                  Subject: Re: [atlas_craftsman] Oiling My "New" Timken Headstock

                  While the felt might filter the oil somewhat, its main purpose is to very slowly feed oil to the bearings.
                  Flooding them does little good and leaves them dry pretty quickly. No matter how much oil is present, only the tiniest bit of it does the work. Still that tiny bit is critical to bearing life and smooth operation.

                  Consider the ball bearings in a 2 cycle engine, lubricated by a mist of 50:1 dilution in gasoline.
                  It don’t take much.

                  Jim Irwin



                  On 4/4/13 11:51 AM, "Glenn N" wrote:

                  That sounds about right to me.  The bearing shields retain a bit of oil down in the bearings and as long as you give it a squirt every day you use it the oil will do it's thing.  The main reason for the felt is to filter the oil.  
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