Loading ...
Sorry, an error occurred while loading the content.

Worn Craftsman 10" lathe

Expand Messages
  • fester225
    I bought a well worn Craftsman 10 lathe. The lead screw I can deal with, but how do repair the ways? There is a section where they are worn down more than
    Message 1 of 7 , Mar 27, 2013
    • 0 Attachment
      I bought a well worn Craftsman 10" lathe. The lead screw I can deal with, but how do repair the ways? There is a section where they are worn down more than .015" from flat.

      How do I add metal to the ways and make them flat again?
    • James Irwin
      YIKES! That¹s a lot of wear!! I don¹t think there¹s any reasonable way (pun?) to fix this. Grinding is pretty darned expensive. Look around for a
      Message 2 of 7 , Mar 27, 2013
      • 0 Attachment
        Re: [atlas_craftsman] Worn Craftsman 10" lathe YIKES!  That’s a lot of wear!!
        I don’t think there’s any reasonable way (pun?) to fix this.
        Grinding is pretty darned expensive.
        Look around for a replacement bed.
        Used to be available fairly often.

        Jim Irwin




        On 3/27/13 12:05 PM, "fester225" wrote:
        I bought a well worn Craftsman 10" lathe. The lead screw I can deal with, but how do repair the ways? There is a section where they are worn down more than .015" from flat.

        How do I add metal to the ways and make them flat again?
      • Guenther Paul
        I have a bed how long a bed is needed  GP ________________________________ From: James Irwin To: Atlas
        Message 3 of 7 , Mar 27, 2013
        • 0 Attachment
          I have a bed how long a bed is needed
           
          GP



          From: James Irwin <jirwin1@...>
          To: Atlas <atlas_craftsman@yahoogroups.com>
          Sent: Wed, March 27, 2013 1:33:08 PM
          Subject: Re: [atlas_craftsman] Worn Craftsman 10" lathe

           

          YIKES!  That’s a lot of wear!!
          I don’t think there’s any reasonable way (pun?) to fix this.
          Grinding is pretty darned expensive.
          Look around for a replacement bed.
          Used to be available fairly often.

          Jim Irwin




          On 3/27/13 12:05 PM, "fester225" wrote:
          I bought a well worn Craftsman 10" lathe. The lead screw I can deal with, but how do repair the ways? There is a section where they are worn down more than .015" from flat.

          How do I add metal to the ways and make them flat again?

        • Guenther Paul
          If interested in the bed contact me of forum  GP ________________________________ From: Guenther Paul To:
          Message 4 of 7 , Mar 27, 2013
          • 0 Attachment
            If interested in the bed contact me of forum
             
            GP



            From: Guenther Paul <paulguenter@...>
            To: atlas_craftsman@yahoogroups.com
            Sent: Wed, March 27, 2013 1:35:22 PM
            Subject: Re: [atlas_craftsman] Worn Craftsman 10" lathe

             

            I have a bed how long a bed is needed
             
            GP



            From: James Irwin <jirwin1@...>
            To: Atlas <atlas_craftsman@yahoogroups.com>
            Sent: Wed, March 27, 2013 1:33:08 PM
            Subject: Re: [atlas_craftsman] Worn Craftsman 10" lathe

             

            YIKES!  That’s a lot of wear!!
            I don’t think there’s any reasonable way (pun?) to fix this.
            Grinding is pretty darned expensive.
            Look around for a replacement bed.
            Used to be available fairly often.

            Jim Irwin




            On 3/27/13 12:05 PM, "fester225" wrote:
            I bought a well worn Craftsman 10" lathe. The lead screw I can deal with, but how do repair the ways? There is a section where they are worn down more than .015" from flat.

            How do I add metal to the ways and make them flat again?

          • Eggleston Lance
            Look into Moglice. It s a material used to repair machine ways. lance ++++
            Message 5 of 7 , Mar 27, 2013
            • 0 Attachment
              Look into Moglice.
              It's a material used to repair
              machine ways.

              lance
              ++++


              On Mar 27, 2013, at 1:05 PM, fester225 wrote:

              I bought a well worn Craftsman 10" lathe. The lead screw I can deal with, but how do repair the ways? There is a section where they are worn down more than .015" from flat.

              How do I add metal to the ways and make them flat again?

            • Doc
              fwiw ..chuck up & .take a light( few thou only or it chatters _ cut on at one inch + bar 6-8 in long W/OUT the tailstock center .( unless you have
              Message 6 of 7 , Mar 27, 2013
              • 0 Attachment
                fwiw ..chuck  up & .take a light( few thou  only or it  chatters _  cut on at one inch + bar 6-8 in  long  W/OUT the  tailstock center .( unless you have indicated i the  t/stock dead on ) & SEE how much variation there  is ,,,,easier to  do  on  aluminum  or  brass.....,it wud be much less than a  thou , closer  to 1/2 thou.....for  most HSM  work , that is more than  adequate ....for  tight  dimensions ,you will probably be finishing  w/ abrasive to hit it dead  on anyway  ..in  industry ,they finish  tight  dim. at  the  cyllindrical  grinder  to get a  good  accurate  finish ..........if  the  worn  area. is of  any  length , work done in that  area  may  only  show variation of 1 tenth  or  two ....of  course  the  smaller  the  bar , the more variation .....if your  trig  is  up to  snuff , trig  out  how much less of a  cut  is  taken  on a  one inch bar w/ the   tool dropping  15 thou......you will be  surprised ....one more  thing , if you use a follower  rest  &  set  up at  a  highpoint , as the  carriage drops into the  worn  area  , the  rest  will pull the  work down allowing  th e bit to continue cutting full  doc ...near all variation  can be  taken ou  this  way when  cutting  a  long  bar ......its a  "work  around" , &  we  all wud like a lathe  w/out  heavy  wear .... Amen!
                    now that  said , take  your time  looking  for  another  bed , or a  lathe  in  better  condition..unless your lifelong  best  friend  has a  large  surface  frinder  & the  experience  to use it , forget  abt  repairing  the  bed ....a  seriously flawed choice for a well worn  atlas /crftsmn, or any  light 9,10,12 HSM type  lathe in "near plumb  wore  out "  condition .....
                   FWIW #2 ...i have  a  24 in  bed you can  have  for  pick up , 60 mi north  of  nashville ...IIRC ,hardly  any  bed wear in  front of  chuck , BUT wear where the tailstock rides near  end of  the  bed .....came out  of  a starter  generator  shop ...lots  of t/stock movement but not  much use of  carriage .....vertical tailstock off center  is  nowhere as  damaging to  accuracy  as is  horizontal off center .....
                 best  wishes
                doc
                     ....
                -----Original Message-----
                From: fester225 <fester225@...>
                To: atlas_craftsman <atlas_craftsman@yahoogroups.com>
                Sent: Wed, Mar 27, 2013 12:05 pm
                Subject: [atlas_craftsman] Worn Craftsman 10" lathe

                 
                I bought a well worn Craftsman 10" lathe. The lead screw I can deal with, but how do repair the ways? There is a section where they are worn down more than .015" from flat.

                How do I add metal to the ways and make them flat again?

              • anthrhodes
                Lance, Moglice is inappropriate for this problem. It s relatively soft and used on the bottom of the carriage where it s not directly exposed to chips and
                Message 7 of 7 , Mar 27, 2013
                • 0 Attachment
                  Lance,
                   
                  Moglice is inappropriate for this problem. It's relatively soft and used on the bottom of the carriage where it's not directly exposed to chips and abrasives, the way wipers are supposed to remove any such materials. On top of the bed ways it will have the abrasive materials lying on top of the Moglice and they will be driven into the soft material by the motion of the carriage.
                   
                  It's not my lathe so the owner can do what he wishes, just a note to the wise.
                   
                  Anthony
                  Berkeley, Calif.
                  *************************************************
                  In a message dated Wed Mar 27, 2013 10:53 am (PDT), Eggleston Lance writes:
                  Look into Moglice.
                  It's a material used to repair
                  machine ways.
                Your message has been successfully submitted and would be delivered to recipients shortly.